Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Nuclear and coal in the UK energy mix

22.01.2008
Renewable energy must be developed in parallel with nuclear power and a clean-up of coal-fired power station technology, if the UK is to meet increasing demand without relying on enormous and potentially debilitating natural gas imports. That is the conclusion drawn from a report to be published in Inderscience's International Journal of Nuclear Governance, Economy and Ecology.

Muhammad Asif of the School of Built and Natural Environment, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow and colleagues John Currie and T. Muneer at the School of Engineering and Built Environment, Napier University, Edinburgh, explain that the provision of sufficient, affordable and secure energy is crucial for any modern economy.

However, across the globe, those same economies are facing challenges such as climate change, limited resources and rising costs. The team has analysed the situation facing the UK and offers a solution based on energy security and diversity in the supply mix that could be the most sustainable option for the country.

Asif and his colleagues explain how currently the UK is self sufficient in natural gas, exporting approximately the same quantities as it imports. The major energy contributors are coal, oil, gas and nuclear power. This is set to change quickly, however, the UK's oil and gas reserves dwindle and coal and nuclear power stations, which today produce almost 54% of the UK total electricity needs will reach the end of their working life.

"It is estimated that the 'business as usual' scenario, over the next two decades, could result in the loss of almost one third of the UK's electricity production capacity," the researchers say. That equates to a loss of 25 Gigawatts of electricity production by the year 2023. The UK will soon have to face the challenge of bridging the widening gap between energy supply and demand.

Others have suggested that the energy mix should shift more towards, gas-fired power stations. However, this could be devastating to the UK economy, Asif and colleagues emphasis. It would increase immensely our reliance on natural gas imports, as well as reducing diversity and so security in the energy mix.

Asif and his colleagues conclude from their energy analysis that the most secure approach to energy supply after 2023 will involve nuclear expansion, the development of clean coal-fired power stations and a dramatic increase in renewable energy sources.

Jim Corlett | alfa
Further information:
http://www.inderscience.com

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer
19.02.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Polymerforschung

nachricht System draws power from daily temperature swings
16.02.2018 | Massachusetts Institute of Technology

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>