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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 262,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 262,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: 'Nanochains' could increase battery capacity, cut charging time

How long the battery of your phone or computer lasts depends on how many lithium ions can be stored in the battery's negative electrode material. If the battery runs out of these ions, it can't generate an electrical current to run a device and ultimately fails.

Materials with a higher lithium ion storage capacity are either too heavy or the wrong shape to replace graphite, the electrode material currently used in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Quality control in immune communication: Chaperones detect immature signaling molecules in the immune system

The cells of our immune system constantly communicate with one another by exchanging complex protein molecules. A team led by researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now revealed how dedicated cellular control proteins, referred to as chaperones, detect immature immune signaling proteins and prevent them from leaving the cell.

The body's defenses systems have to react quickly whenever pathogens enter the organism. Intruders are identified by white blood cells which pass on the...

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Moderately Common Plants Show Highest Relative Losses

Species that used to be abundant show the highest relative losses and have decreased on average to half their previous abundance levels. Researchers from the University of Rostock and the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) have shown this decline using data from Mecklenburg-Vorpommern. The team led by Professor Florian Jansen has now published its findings in the journal Conservation Letters.

Two-thirds of the 355 plant species studied are less common today than they used to be. "The species showing the steepest decline are not the endangered...

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

The Fluid Fingerprint of Hurricanes

HU researcher investigates ‘El Niño’

The climatic phenomenon ‘El Niño/Southern Oscillation’ leads repeatedly in the Mesoamerican and Caribbean regions to natural catastrophes – extreme droughts...

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New structural data on talin explain self-inhibitory mechanism

  • Defective cellular adhesion plays a central role in cancer and immune reactions
  • Talin is one of the key proteins involved in the machinery of cellular adhesion
  • The entire structure of talin has been determined with the help of cryo-electron microscopy
  • Now the protein’s regulation mechanism can be explained

All complex organisms are made up of cells that are in contact with each other or with structures in intercellular spaces. Cells have contact points on their...

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Appreciating the classical elegance of time crystals

Physicists at ETH Zurich have developed a versatile framework for studying periodically driven systems, providing a unifying platform to explore so-called 'time crystals' in both the classical and the quantum regime

In a crystal, atoms are highly ordered, occupying well-defined locations that form spatial patterns. Seven years ago, the 2004 Physics Nobel laureate Frank...

20.09.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Highly sensitive sensors to measure the heart and brain activity

Kiel research team develops energy-efficient sensors for extremely low frequencies

Electrical signals measurements such as the ECG (electrocardiogram) can show how the human brain or heart works. Next to electrical signals magnetic signals...

20.09.2019 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Motion pictures from living cells: Research team from Jena and Bielefeld improves superresolution microscopy

In order to observe cells at work, researchers have to bypass a physical law. One of the fastest techniques to overcome the resolution limit of classical light microscopy is high-resolution structured illumination microscopy. It makes visible details that are about a hundred nanometres in size. However, translating the data back into images has taken a long time so far. A research team from the University of Bielefeld, the Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology and the Friedrich Schiller University in Jena has now developed a technique to observe processes in the cell. The results were published in "Nature Communications" on September 20, 2019.

This graphics card normally helps computer gamers to have a great gaming experience. The researchers, however, use it to observe the smallest cell components...

20.09.2019 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

DGIST achieves the highest efficiency of flexible CZTSSe thin-film solar cell

DGIST announced on Tuesday, September 10 that Dr. Jin-Kyu Kang's research team in Division of Energy Technology achieved 11.4% for the photoelectric conversion1 efficiency of flexible CZTSSe thin-film solar cell, the highest in the world. This research is expected to contribute to the development of future solar power technology and the thin-film solar cell industry of next generation.

Flexible thin-film solar cell can be applied in various fields such as wearable, building, and automobiles based on the flexible substrate technology.

19.09.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

NTU Singapore scientists develop technique to observe radiation damage over femtoseconds

Scientists at Nanyang Technological University, Singapore (NTU Singapore) have developed a technique to observe how radiation damages molecules over time-frames of just one quadrillionth of a second - or a femtosecond.

The technique involves dissolving organic molecules in water to simulate the state molecules are found in biological tissue. This allows the research team to...

19.09.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

How to construct a protein factory

The complexity of molecular structures in the cell is amazing. Having achieved great success in elucidating these structures in recent years, biologists are now taking on the next challenge: to find out more about how they are constructed. A joint research project between two groups from the University of Bern and ETH Zurich now provides insight into a very unusual construction process in the unicellular parasite Trypanosoma brucei.

Cells consist of a multitude of molecular structures, some of them exhibiting a staggering complexity. Ribosomes, the protein factories of the cell, belong to...

19.09.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Quality Control in Cells

Heidelberg researchers investigate key component in bacteria

A protective protein that can detect newly-made incomplete and hence potentially toxic protein chains in higher cells is found to have a relative in bacteria....

19.09.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

UMD-led study captures six galaxies undergoing sudden, dramatic transitions

Zwicky Transient Facility observations reveal surprising transformations from sleepy LINER galaxies to blazing quasars within months

Galaxies come in a wide variety of shapes, sizes and brightnesses, ranging from humdrum ordinary galaxies to luminous active galaxies. While an ordinary galaxy...

19.09.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Study points to new drug target in fight against cancer

Research shows how a cancer-linked protein blocks key mitochondrial gateway

Researchers have identified a potential new drug target in the fight against cancer.

19.09.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

New tool improves beekeepers' overwintering odds and bottom line

A new tool from the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) can predict the odds that honey bee colonies overwintered in cold storage will be large enough to rent for almond pollination in February. Identifying which colonies will not be worth spending dollars to overwinter can improve beekeepers' bottom line.

Beekeepers have been losing an average of 30 percent of overwintered colonies for nearly 15 years. It is expensive to overwinter colonies in areas where winter...

19.09.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stevens team closes in on 'holy grail' of room temperature quantum computing chips

Photons interact on chip-based system with unprecedented efficiency

To process information, photons must interact. However, these tiny packets of light want nothing to do with each other, each passing by without altering the...

19.09.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Advanced AI boosts clinical analysis of eye images

A fast and reliable machine learning tool, developed by the ARTORG Center, University of Bern and the Department of Ophthalmology, Inselspital brings Artificial Intelligence (AI) closer to clinical use in Ophthalmology. The novel method published in Nature Scientific Reports on September 19, 2019 presents a tool that reliably extracts meaning from extensive image data. Based on a convolutional neural network (CNN) the tool is able to provide results within seconds, thus supporting the doctor with comprehensive image analysis during a consultation with the patient.

Modern medical imaging devices allow ophthalmologists to monitor chronic eye conditions in detail. Ophthalmologists mostly choose Optical Coherence Tomography...

19.09.2019 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Researchers develop tumour growth roadmap

Researchers at Leipzig University and Leipzig University Hospital (UKL) have discovered that tumour growth and tissue invasion by cancer cells can be predicted based on the ontogenetic distance between tissues. Simulations of tumour spread patterns and analysis of pathological data yielded results that contradicted the prevailing assumption that tumours spread randomly and equally in all directions. They have now published their findings in the renowned journal "Scientific Reports".

“Our approach equips surgeons with a roadmap for the surgical removal of tumours, giving patients a much better chance of survival, reducing the likelihood of...

19.09.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Stroke patients relearning how to walk with peculiar shoe

A therapeutic shoe engineered to improve stroke recovery is proving successful and expected to hit the market by the end of the year. Clinical trials have been completed on the U.S. patented and licensed iStride Device, formerly the Gait Enhancing Mobile Shoe (GEMS), with results just published in the Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation.

Stroke sufferers experience muscle weakness or partial paralysis on one side of the body, which greatly impacts how they walk, known as gait. Gait asymmetry is...

18.09.2019 | Innovative Products | nachricht Read more

Statistical inference to mimic the operating manner of highly-experienced crystallographer

Prior evaluation of crystal structure analysis using a small data set

A research team from Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), RIKEN, and the University of Tokyo developed a novel data analysis method for prior evaluation...

18.09.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Scientists' design discovery doubles conductivity of indium oxide transparent coatings

Researchers at the University of Liverpool, University College London (UCL), NSG Group (Pilkington) and Diamond Light Source have made an important design discovery that could dramatically improve the performance of a key material used to coat touch screens and other devices.

Tin doped indium oxide -ITO - is the leading material used in the coating applied to the glass or clear plastic of touch screens, solar cells and light...

18.09.2019 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stevens researchers to develop handheld device to diagnose skin cancer

The proven technology will be designed into a handheld device that could reduce need for painful biopsies by 50 percent -- and disrupt the $5.3 billion diagnostics market

Even the best dermatologists can't diagnose skin cancer by eye, relying on magnifying glasses to examine suspicious blemishes and scalpels to cut tissue for...

18.09.2019 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Elusive compounds of greenhouse gas isolated by Warwick chemists

  • Nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas and ozone depleting substance.
  • The ability to exploit this gas as a chemical reagent is an attractive prospect, both as an abundant feedstock and means to remediate the detrimental impact it has on the environment.
  • Researchers at the University of Warwick have prepared transition metal compounds of nitrous oxide that provide a conceptional foundation for its application in new value-added chemical processes.

Nitrous oxide (N2O) is a potent atmospheric pollutant. Although naturally occurring, anthropogenic N2O emissions from intensive agricultural fertilisation,...

18.09.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists create fully electronic 2-dimensional spin transistors

Physicists from the University of Groningen constructed a two-dimensional spin transistor, in which spin currents were generated by an electric current through graphene. A monolayer of a transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD) was placed on top of graphene to induce charge-to-spin conversion in the graphene. This experimental observation was described in the issue of the journal Nano Letters published on 11 September 2019.

Spintronics is an attractive alternative way of creating low-power electronic devices. It is not based on a charge current but on a current of electron spins....

18.09.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Quality control in immune communication: Chaperones detect immature signaling molecules in the immune system

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences

Moderately Common Plants Show Highest Relative Losses

20.09.2019 | Life Sciences

The Fluid Fingerprint of Hurricanes

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