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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 259,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 259,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Self-healing coating made of corn starch makes small scratches disappear through heat

Due to the special arrangement of its molecules, a new coating made of corn starch is able to repair small scratches by itself through heat: The cross-linking via ring-shaped molecules makes the material mobile, so that it compensates for the scratches and these disappear again.

Superficial micro-scratches on the car body or on other high-gloss surfaces are harmless, but annoying. Especially in the luxury segment such surfaces are...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Inselspital: Fewer CT scans needed after cerebral bleeding

A computed tomography (CT) scan of the head is routinely performed as a check after operating a subdural haematoma. However, this may prompt additional, unnecessary surgeries and result in higher costs as well as an increased rate of complications, without recognizable benefits for the patients. This is shown by a study recently published in the renowned “New England Journal of Medicine” by the University Neurocenter Bern at Inselspital.

Chronic subdural haematoma is bleeding between the brain and the skull, the intracranial space, usually following a head injury. It occurs predominately among...

20.03.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Intelligent material improves aerodynamics in cars and aircraft

In order to save energy, aerodynamics is important for cars and aircraft. However, technologies controlling saving of energy are only designed for one speed range. Researchers at Technische Universität Kaiserslautern have developed a more flexible method: Thanks to a so-called shape memory wire, the "intelligent material" can automatically adapt its shape to changing conditions. It can also be tailored to customer requirements and integrated into existing components. The researchers market their material in their start-up “CompActive.” They will present this material at the Hannover Messe from 1 to 5 April at the Rhineland-Palatinate research stand (Hall 2, Stand B40).

In search of prey, eagles circle slowly in the air. Their fan-shaped spread feathers at their wing ends ensure that they are travelling as efficiently as...

20.03.2019 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Levitating objects with light

Nanoscale patterning could enable precise manipulation of objects on many scales

Researchers at Caltech have designed a way to levitate and propel objects using only light, by creating specific nanoscale patterning on the objects' surfaces.

19.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New technique for in-cell distance determination

Researchers from the University of Konstanz, Bielefeld University and ETH Zurich demonstrate for the first time that the pulsed EPR technique RIDME (relaxation-induced dipolar modulation enhancement) can be used for in-cell distance determination in biomacromolecules. Applied within the cell, RIDME improves significantly on conventional double electron–electron resonance (DEER) measurements.

In a joint paper which has just been published in The Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, researchers from the University of Konstanz, Bielefeld University...

19.03.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Stellar cartography

The Potsdam Echelle Polarimetric and Spectroscopic Instrument (PEPSI) at the Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) in Arizona released its first image of the surface magnetic field of another star. In a paper in the European journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, the PEPSI team presents a Zeeman- Doppler-Image of the surface of the magnetically active star II Pegasi.

A special technique allows astronomers to resolve the surfaces of faraway stars. Those are otherwise only seen as point sources, even in the largest telescopes...

19.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Deep Brain Stimulation Provides Sustained Relief for Severe Depression

World’s largest study of deep brain stimulation in the brain’s reward system / Study with 16 participants with previously treatment-resistant depression shows excellent results over one year / Results published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology

Patients suffering from severe, treatment-resistant depression can benefit not only acutely but also the long-term from deep brain stimulation, as researchers...

19.03.2019 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Smart glove for Industry 4.0: Connecting the physical hand to the virtual world

Researchers at Saarland University have created an ultrathin flexible film that can act as a sensor for innovative technologies. Integrated within a glove, the new sensory film can communicate the current position of the wearer’s hand and fingers. By establishing a direct connection between the virtual and real working worlds, man and machine can, quite literally, work hand in hand. The research team led by Professor Stefan Seelecke has achieved this through the use of smart silicone films. Another goal of the research work is to assist the wearer of the glove by transmitting tactile signals, such as pulses or vibrations, that are produced by the polymer film.

The team of engineers will be at Hannover Messe from the 1st to the 5th of April at the Saarland Research and Innovation Stand (Hall 2, Stand B46), where they...

19.03.2019 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Heading towards a tsunami of light

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology and the University of Gothenburg, Sweden, have proposed a way to create a completely new source of radiation. Ultra-intense light pulses consist of the motion of a single wave and can be described as a tsunami of light. The strong wave can be used to study interactions between matter and light in a unique way. Their research is now published in the scientific journal Physical Review Letters.

"This source of radiation lets us look at reality through a new angle - it is like twisting a mirror and discovering something completely different," says...

19.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Dalian Coherent Light Source reveals hydroxyl super rotors from water photochemistry

Scientists at the Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics of the Chinese Academy of Sciences recently revealed hydroxyl super rotors from water photochemistry by using the Dalian Coherent Light Source (DCLS). The researchers, under the direction of Prof. YUAN Kaijun and Prof. YANG Xueming, published their findings in Nature Communications.

Hydroxyl (OH) is a key radical in interstellar oxygen chemistry due to its capacity to react with most gases in the interstellar medium. OH radicals with...

19.03.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

From foam to bone: Plant cellulose can pave the way for healthy bone implants

Researchers from the University of British Columbia and McMaster University have developed what could be the bone implant material of the future: an airy, foamlike substance that can be injected into the body and provide scaffolding for the growth of new bone.

It's made by treating nanocrystals derived from plant cellulose so that they link up and form a strong but lightweight sponge - technically speaking, an...

19.03.2019 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Radar Sensors Increase Efficiency of Production and Automation

Sensors allow the automation of production and logistic processes and are consequently the foundation for effective added value. Yet, their advantages are evident: Compared to optical sensors, radar systems are unaffected by challenging visual conditions and, opposed to X-rays, they pose no threat to health. The Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF develops compact and high-resolution radar systems, which can significantly increase the efficiency of different industrial processes. The newest technologies will be shown at Hannover Fair 2019 (Hall 2, Booth C22), from April 1-5.

The radar systems developed at Fraunhofer IAF work in the millimeter-wave range and are able to penetrate most non-metallic materials such as plastic,...

19.03.2019 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Additive printing processes for flexible touchscreens: increased materials and cost efficiency

The INM - Leibniz Institute for New Materials has developed new processes with photochemical metallization and printing (gravure printing, inkjet printing) of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), which are significantly more time- and cost-saving. These will be presented by the scientists at this year's Hannover Messe from 1 to 5 April at Stand C54 in Hall 5.

In addition to foldable smartphones, the industry's big players are also working on flexible displays. Until now, touchscreens have been rigid and do not yield...

19.03.2019 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Building blocks for new medications: the University of Graz is seeking a technology partner

Painkillers and cancer medications, psychotherapeutic drugs, allergy medications – many substances used in the medical sciences are manufactured with the help of piperidin-4-ones. These are intermediates created by reactions with derivatives of ammonia. Werner Seebacher from the Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences at the University of Graz has discovered an alternative reaction pathway to synthesise new kinds of piperidin-4-ones that have the potential to significantly increase the range of therapeutic options they offer. The University of Graz is currently looking for a partner from the pharmaceutical industry to realise the potential of this technology.

The opiod fentanyl, which is used in anaesthesia and in the treatment of acute and chronic pain, is one of the most important drugs made with piperidin-4-ones....

19.03.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Researchers measure near-perfect performance in low-cost semiconductors

Tiny, easy-to-produce particles, called quantum dots, may soon take the place of more expensive single crystal semiconductors in advanced electronics found in solar panels, camera sensors and medical imaging tools. Although quantum dots have begun to break into the consumer market - in the form of quantum dot TVs - they have been hampered by long-standing uncertainties about their quality. Now, a new measurement technique developed by researchers at Stanford University may finally dissolve those doubts.

"Traditional semiconductors are single crystals, grown in vacuum under special conditions. These we can make in large numbers, in flask, in a lab and we've...

18.03.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Nanocrystal 'factory' could revolutionize quantum dot manufacturing

North Carolina State University researchers have developed a microfluidic system for synthesizing perovskite quantum dots across the entire spectrum of visible light. The system drastically reduces manufacturing costs, can be tuned on demand to any color and allows for real-time process monitoring to ensure quality control.

Over the last two decades, colloidal semiconductor nanocrystals, known as quantum dots (QDs), have emerged as novel materials for applications ranging from...

18.03.2019 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Long-distance quantum information exchange -- success at the nanoscale

At the Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, researchers have realized the swap of electron spins between distant quantum dots. The discovery brings us a step closer to future applications of quantum information, as the tiny dots have to leave enough room on the microchip for delicate control electrodes.

The distance between the dots has now become big enough for integration with traditional microelectronics and perhaps, a future quantum computer. The result is...

18.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

How heavy elements come about in the universe

An experiment at GSI simulates how heavy elements capture protons.

Heavy elements are produced during stellar explosion or on the surfaces of neutron stars through the capture of hydrogen nuclei (protons).

18.03.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Robot arms with the flexibility of an elephant’s trunk

Unlike conventional robot arms with their hinged and swivel joints, the flexible arms being developed by Professor Stefan Seelecke and his research group at Saarland University are constructed using muscles made from shape-memory wires that have the ability to bend in almost any direction and to wind themselves around corners. The flexible arms are powered electrically and so can do without the usual pneumatic equipment or other bulky accessories. As the shape-memory alloy itself has sensor properties, the arms can be controlled without the need for additional sensors.

The new technology can be used to build large robotic arms with the flexibility of an elephant’s trunk or ultrafine tentacles for use in endoscopic operations.

18.03.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Microbes can grow on nitric oxide (NO)

Nitric oxide (NO) is a central molecule of the global nitrogen cycle. A study by Boran Kartal from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, Germany, and colleagues reveals that microorganisms can grow on NO. Their results, which are now published in Nature Communications, change our view of the earth’s nitrogen cycle and how microorganisms regulate the release of greenhouse gases from natural and man-made environments.

Nitric oxide is a fascinating and versatile molecule, important for all living things as well as our environment: It is highly reactive and toxic, it is used...

18.03.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

HMI 2019: Conductive metal-polymer inks for inkjet printing: flexible electronics without sintering

The INM – Leibniz Institute for New Materials presents hybrid inks for inkjet printing that contain metal nanoparticles coated with conductive polymers. The inks can be formulated in water and in other polar solvents and are suitable to print conductive structures on a range of substrates without any subsequent thermal or UV treatment. Standard metal inks require annealing after inkjet printing to become conductive. INM’s new inks obviate this step, making them compatible with many substrates including thin polymer foils and paper.

The developers will demonstrate their hybrid inks at stand C54 in hall 5 at this year's Hannover Messe, which takes place from April 1 to 5.

18.03.2019 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Faster detection of atrial fibrillation thanks to smartwatch

Atrial fibrillation can be correctly detected using commercially available smartwatches. This is the conclusion of a study by researchers of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK) at the University Medicine Greifswald and researchers from the Basel University Hospital. In the future, electronic watches could be used to comfortably and regularly monitor the heart rhythm of patients with an increased risk. This tool has the potential to detect atrial fibrillation earlier and thus reduce the risk for a stroke significantly.

Atrial fibrillation is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Experts expect that it will occur even twice as often in the over 55's in the next 40 years. If the...

18.03.2019 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

A peek into lymph nodes

A new method to diagnose cancer cells inside lymph nodes could allow doctors to treat cancers before they spread around the body

The vast majority of cancer deaths occur due to the spread of cancer from one organ to another, which can happen either through the blood or the lymphatic...

15.03.2019 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Novel methods for analyzing neural circuits for innate behaviors in insects

Insects show a variety of species-specific innate behaviors (instinctive behaviors). For example, a worker honeybee that has found flower nectar exhibits 8-shape waggle-dances upon returning to its beehive. A male moth that has detected a sex pheromone flies around to look for a female counterpart. There remain a number of questions about how a variety of innate behaviors are generated by functions of neural circuits in the insect brain.

In order to obtain full pictures of neural circuits and their functions responsible for innate behaviors, it is necessary to reveal neural circuits that are...

15.03.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Inselspital: Fewer CT scans needed after cerebral bleeding

20.03.2019 | Health and Medicine

Intelligent material improves aerodynamics in cars and aircraft

20.03.2019 | Trade Fair News

Self-healing coating made of corn starch makes small scratches disappear through heat

20.03.2019 | Trade Fair News

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