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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 260,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 260,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

A stellar flare 10 times more powerful than anything seen on our sun has burst from an ultracool star almost the same size as Jupiter

  • Coolest and smallest star to produce a superflare found
  • Star is a tenth of the radius of our Sun
  • Researchers led by University of Warwick could only see...
All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

A 100% Québec discovery made at Polytechnique Montréal in partnership with McGill University

FROM CONVENTIONAL MICROFLUIDICS TO OPEN-SPACE MICROFLUIDICS

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs

Scientists at the University of Hawai`i at Mānoa Department of Biology have developed a technique for measuring the amount of living coral on a reef by analyzing DNA in small samples of seawater. The new research by Patrick Nichols, a graduate student in the marine biology graduate program, and Peter Marko, an associate professor in the Department of Biology, was published in Environmental DNA.

Underwater visual surveys are used widely in coral reef ecology and are an important part of any coral reef monitoring program. However, visual surveys are...

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Sanitized siphons – fewer hospital germs

As a partner in the newly launched "Siphon" project, the Fraunhofer FEP will be presenting the Institute's current research focused on the field of hygiene and sanitation at the MedTecLIVE trade fair in Nuremberg (Hall 10, Booth 10.0 - 621) May 21-23, 2019.

About 800,000 - 900,000 people every year in Germany alone[1] suffer from nosocomial infections, i.e. infections that occur in connection with...

18.04.2019 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

In vivo super-resolution photoacoustic computed tomography by localization of single dyed droplets

Photoacoustic computed tomography (PACT) is a non-invasive hybrid imaging technique that excites biological tissues with light and detects the subsequently generated ultrasound to form images. PACT combines the advantages of both optical imaging--high optical contrast, and ultrasonic imaging--high resolution and deep penetration in biological tissues. PACT has been widely used for vascular network mapping, functional brain imaging, and tumor detection in deep tissues.

However, by detecting ultrasonic waves, PACT cannot escape the doom that is faced by all wave-based imaging techniques: the diffraction of waves presents a...

18.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Contact lenses with medicine and sugar

Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Polymer Research IAP are working with Israeli and German partners to develop long-wearing contact lenses that can release medicine. The active ingredient is encapsulated in liposomes and bound to the inside of the contact lenses. This enables it to remain in the eye for longer. Sugars are added to make the contact lens particularly comfortable to wear.

When eye diseases are treated topically often only about five percent of the drug has an effect on the eye tissue. The German-Israeli research team would...

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

First astrophysical detection of the helium hydride ion

HeH+ was the first molecule that formed when, 13 billion years ago, falling temperatures in the young Universe allowed recombination of the light elements produced in the Big Bang. At that time, ionized hydrogen and neutral helium atoms reacted to form HeH+.

Despite its importance in the history of the early Universe, HeH+ has so far escaped detection in astrophysical nebulae. Operating the GREAT far-infrared...

18.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

CubeSats prove their worth for scientific missions

They may be small, but CubeSats are mighty when it comes to affordably obtaining scientific data in space

Only a few years ago, the astronomy and heliophysics communities were skeptical about whether CubeSats could reliably obtain scientific data. But these...

17.04.2019 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Neuron and synapse-mimetic spintronics devices developed

A research group from Tohoku University has developed spintronics devices which are promising for future energy-efficient and adoptive computing systems, as they behave like neurons and synapses in the human brain.

Today's information society is built on digital computers that have evolved drastically for half a century and are capable of executing complicated tasks...

17.04.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Better healing for eardrum injuries? - new adhesive structures for medical applications

In cooperation with the Saarland University Hospital, the INM has developed bioinspired adhesive structures for the treatment of eardrum injuries. The adhesive structures are now to be transferred into a biomedical product.

More than 30 million people worldwide suffer from eardrum injuries every year. If inadequately treated, the resulting hearing loss can severely restrict the...

17.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New study shows people used natural dyes to colour their clothing thousands of years ago

Even thousands of years ago people wore clothing with colourful patterns made from plant and animal-based dyes. Chemists from Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) have created new analytical methods to examine textiles from China and Peru that are several thousand years old. In the scientific journal "Scientific Reports" they describe their new method that is able to reconstruct the spatial distribution of dyes, and hence the patterns, in textile samples.

Chemists Dr Annemarie Kramell and Professor René Csuk from MLU examined two ancient textile samples. One comes from the ancient Chinese city of Niya and was...

17.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Printing nanoparticle shapes for medical applications

Personal drug delivery or nano-robotic systems could be a key concept for future medical applications. In this context, scientists around David Ng (Department of Prof. Tanja Weil) of the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have recently developed a technology to customize the shapes of polymers and polymeric nanoparticles using DNA. In both 2D and 3D, precise patterns of structures composed of biocompatible polymer materials can be easily designed and constructed on a template.

In the range of a millionth of a millimeter, the size range of a virus, synthetic nanomaterials are anticipated to be the next milestone in medical technology....

17.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

SLAC's high-speed 'electron camera' films molecular movie in HD

First direct look at how atoms move when a ring-shaped molecule breaks apart could boost our understanding of fundamental processes of life

With an extremely fast "electron camera" at the Department of Energy's SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, researchers have made the first high-definition...

17.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New compound allows bacterial communication to be controlled by light

Scientists from the University of Groningen have succeeded in incorporating a light-controlled switch into a molecule used by bacteria for quorum sensing - a process by which bacteria communicate and subsequently control different cellular processes. With the molecule described, it is possible to either inhibit or stimulate communication. This makes it a very useful tool for further research into bacterial communication and its influence on different genetic pathways. The results were published on 15 April in the journal Chem.

In order to respond to their environment, bacteria 'talk' to each other through a form of chemical communication called quorum sensing. The cells secrete a...

17.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Princeton scientists discover an interaction that helps cancers spread to bone

A Princeton-led team of researchers have discovered a factor that promotes the spread of cancers to bone, opening the way toward treatments that could mitigate cancer's ability to colonize bone. The study by Mark Esposito, Yibin Kang and colleagues appears in the April 15 issue of Nature Cell Biology.

"A large majority of human cancers are carcinomas derived from epithelial cells," says Kang, a professor of molecular biology and the corresponding author of...

17.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A breakthrough in acidic water electrolysis via ruthenium-based catalysts

Hydrogen fuel, with the advantages of clean, renewable and of high fuel efficiency, is seen as the "ultimate fuel" and getting more attention around the world. Water electrolysis is an ideal way to produce hydrogen, yet it requires active and stable catalysts which make this process more efficient and cheaper. Without suitable catalysts, turning water into fuel only seems too good to be true.

Fortunately, a recent study is bringing this dream closer. Professor WU Yuen's team from the University of Science and Technology of China (USTC) successfully...

17.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Light from exotic particle states

A new type of light-emitting diode has been developed at TU Wien. Light is produced from the radiative decay of exciton complexes in layers of just a few atoms thickness.

When particles bond in free space, they normally create atoms or molecules. However, much more exotic bonding states can be produced inside solid objects.

16.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

What happens in the bodies of ALS patients?

Scientists from TU Dresden find ways to reduce the number of dying neurons and search for therapeutic approaches to treat ALS

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is an incurable disease of the central nervous system. In most cases, ALS is fatal within a short period following...

16.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scanning for cancer treatment

Researchers combine CRISPR gene-editing technology with drug discovery to understand why treatment works (or doesn't)

11,000 people are predicted to die from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in 2019, according to the American Cancer Society. The cancer starts in the bone marrow....

16.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NRL develops laser processing method to increase efficiency of optoelectronic devices

Scientists at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) discovered a new method to passivate defects in next generation optical materials to improve optical quality and enable the miniaturization of light emitting diodes and other optical elements.

"From a chemistry standpoint, we have discovered a new photocatalytic reaction using laser light and water molecules, which is new and exciting," said Saujan...

16.04.2019 | Process Engineering | nachricht Read more

Microscopy in the body

Biotechnologists, physicists, and medical researchers at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed technology for microscopic imaging in living organisms. A miniaturised multi-photon microscope, which could be used in an endoscope in future, excites the body’s own molecules to illuminate and enables cells and tissue structures to be imaged without the use of synthetic contrast agents. The findings have now been published in the renowned journal ‘Advanced Science’.

Laser used to illuminate molecules

16.04.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

TESS finds its first Earth-sized planet

A nearby system hosts the first Earth-sized planet discovered by NASA's Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite, as well as a warm sub-Neptune-sized world

A nearby system hosts the first Earth-sized planet discovered by NASA's Transiting Exoplanets Survey Satellite, as well as a warm sub-Neptune-sized world,...

16.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Graphene gives a tremendous boost to future terahertz cameras

A study in Nano Letters reports on the development of a graphene-enabled detector for terahertz light that is faster and more sensitive than existing room-temperature technologies

Detecting terahertz (THz) light is extremely useful for two main reasons:

16.04.2019 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Astronomers take first, high-resolution look at huge star-forming region of Milky Way

Astronomers from the United States and South Korea have made the first high-resolution, radio telescope observations of the molecular clouds within a massive star-forming region of the outer Milky Way.

"This region is behind a nearby cloud of dust and gas," said Charles Kerton, an associate professor of physics and astronomy at Iowa State University and a...

16.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

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Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

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Fraunhofer FHR at the IEEE Radar Conference 2019 in Boston, USA

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Latest News

New automated biological-sample analysis systems to accelerate disease detection

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

Explosion on Jupiter-sized star 10 times more powerful than ever seen on our sun

18.04.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New eDNA technology used to quickly assess coral reefs

18.04.2019 | Life Sciences

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