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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 264,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 264,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Miniature double glazing: Material developed which is heat-insulating and heat-conducting at the same time

Styrofoam or copper - both materials have very different properties with regard to their ability to conduct heat. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz and the University of Bayreuth have now jointly developed and characterized a novel, extremely thin and transparent material that has different thermal conduction properties depending on the direction. While it can conduct heat extremely well in one direction, it shows good thermal insulation in the other direction.

Thermal insulation and thermal conduction play a crucial role in our everyday lives - from computer processors, where it is important to dissipate heat as...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

A new 'cool' blue

Throughout history, people have sought vibrant blue pigments. The Egyptians and Babylonians used lapis lazuli 6,000 years ago. In 1802, a French chemist synthesized cobalt blue. More recently, in 2009 scientists discovered YInMn Blue, otherwise known as "Oregon Blue." But most of these pigments have limitations in terms of cost, stability, color or toxicity. Now, researchers in ACS Omega report a new class of 'cool' blue colorants that are inexpensive, durable and more environmentally friendly.

For the last 200 years, cobalt blue (CoAl2O4) has been a dominant commercial blue pigment because of its color intensity, ease of synthesis and versatility.

17.01.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

EU-project SONAR: Better batteries for electricity from renewable energy sources

Electricity from renewable energy sources contributes to combat climate change. One of the challenges is to develop technologies for storing excesses in energy supplies quickly and without loss. Organic redox flow batteries (RFBs) promise a viable route to this end: operated where needed, they rely on matter-bound storage – just in analogy to nature's example.

The benefits of an RFB system depend on many aspects: The perfect, redox-active material should smoothly accept or release electrons, while being soluble,...

17.01.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Neuromuscular organoid: It’s contracting!

MDC researchers established a new model to study neuromuscular development and disorders. For the first time two distinct human tissues co-developed in the lab from one progenitor cell type and self-organized into a complex, functional neuromuscular organoid.

The Gouti lab from the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) has developed functional neuromuscular organoids (NMOs)...

17.01.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Mutations in donors' stem cells may cause problems for cancer patients

Heart problems, graft-versus-host disease are concerns

A stem cell transplant -- also called a bone marrow transplant -- is a common treatment for blood cancers, such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

17.01.2020 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

How decisions unfold in a zebrafish brain

Researchers at the Rockefeller University and the Research Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna, alongside collaborators, were able to track the activity of individual neurons in the entire brain of zebrafish larvae, thus opening an opportunity to observe decision-making processes in unprecedented temporal and spatial resolution.

Some things we do appear almost automatic, such as opening the fridge when feeling hungry. Although such decisions do not seem to take much thought, they are...

17.01.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Overactive brain waves trigger essential tremor

The source of essential tremor--a movement disorder that causes involuntary trembling of the hands, arms, and head--has been enigmatic, impeding the development of effective treatments for a condition that affects 4% of people over 40.

Now a new study from Columbia University Irving Medical Center and NewYork-Presbyterian suggests the tremors are caused by overactive brain waves at the base...

17.01.2020 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

ZMT-Expert supports the implementation of the ambitious marine reserve in Palau

On 1 January 2020, the island state of Palau implemented one of the world's largest and most ambitious marine protected areas in its territorial waters. The international advisory team of experts also included an ecologist from the Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research (ZMT).

On 1 January 2020, the island state of Palau implemented an unparalleled marine sanctuary in its territorial waters: the Palau National Marine Sanctuary. It is...

17.01.2020 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Decontaminating pesticide-polluted water using engineered nanomaterial and sunlight

Two INRS teams join forces and develop a new ecological process to degrade atrazine

Atrazine is one of the most widely used pesticides in North America. Researchers at the Institut National de la Recherche Scientifique (INRS) have developed a...

16.01.2020 | Process Engineering | nachricht Read more

MOSHEMT—innovative transistor technology reaches record frequencies

Scientists at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF have succeeded in developing a novel type of transistor with extremely high cut-off frequencies: metal oxide semiconductor HEMTs, in short MOSHEMTs. To achieve this, they have replaced the Schottky barrier of a conventional HEMT with an oxide. The result is a transistor that enables even smaller and more powerful devices. It has already reached record frequencies of 640 GHz. This technology is expected to advance next generation electronics.

The high frequency characteristics of high eElectron mobility transistors (HEMTs) have been steadily improved in the past years. The transistors have become...

16.01.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

NASA, NOAA analyses reveal 2019 second warmest year on record

According to independent analyses by NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Earth's global surface temperatures in 2019 were the second warmest since modern recordkeeping began in 1880.

Globally, 2019 temperatures were second only to those of 2016 and continued the planet's long-term warming trend: the past five years have been the warmest of...

16.01.2020 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

New assessment of gas locked in ice in European waters

A study led by the University of Southampton has mapped several sites in Europe containing gas hydrate - a relatively clean fuel which could help bridge the gap between fossil fuels and renewables.

Vast amounts of natural gas are stored in an ice-like form beneath the seabed, under the deep seafloor, close to edge of the landmasses that form our...

16.01.2020 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Climate factor clouds — the field campaign “EUREC4A” intends to answer one of climate sciences great mysteries

On 20 January 2020, the almost six-week field study EUREC4A (Elucidating the role of clouds-circulation coupling in climate) will start. It aims at validating theories on the role of clouds and convection for climate change through extensive measurements in the atmosphere and ocean. In addition, EUREC4A will study how fine-scale features in the ocean – eddies and fronts – interact with the atmosphere. The scale and coverage of the measurements will provide opportunities to evaluate a new generation of climate models and satellite data products.

The French-German initiated field study involves more than 40 partner institutions and the deployment of five research aircrafts, four research vessels, ground...

16.01.2020 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fraunhofer IAF establishes an application laboratory for quantum sensors

In order to advance the transfer of research developments from the field of quantum sensor technology into industrial applications, an application laboratory is being established at Fraunhofer IAF. This will enable interested companies and especially regional SMEs and start-ups to evaluate the innovation potential of quantum sensors for their specific requirements. Both the state of Baden-Württemberg and the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft are supporting the four-year project with one million euros each.

The application laboratory is being set up as part of the Fraunhofer lighthouse project »QMag«, short for quantum magnetometry. In this project, researchers...

16.01.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Visualising Molecular Patterns of Membrane TNF Receptors

Single-molecule microscopy visualises the dance of receptors

Whether a sick cell dies, divides, or travels through the body is regulated by a sophisticated interplay of signal molecules and receptors on the cell...

16.01.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Complex, porous, chiral nano-patterns arise from a simple linear building blocks: Pretty with a twist

Nanoscience can arrange minute molecular entities into nanometric patterns in an orderly manner using self-assembly protocols. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have functionalized a simple rod-like building block with hydroxamic acids at both ends. They form molecular networks that not only display the complexity and beauty of mono-component self-assembly on surfaces; they also exhibit exceptional properties.

Designing components for molecular self-assembly calls for functionalities that ‘interlock’. For example, our genetic information is encoded in two DNA...

16.01.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists pioneer new generation of semiconductor neutron detector

Whether you are trying to detect a possible radiation signature from a suspicious package or vehicle, or you are measuring power output in a nuclear reactor, being able to detect neutrons efficiently and precisely represents a significant challenge.

Most neutron detectors work based on one of two different technologies. Some, like those based on helium, are gas-filled. Others, like those based on lithium...

16.01.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Researchers identify gene with functional role in aging of eye

In mouse studies, a 'methylation clock' on the ELOVL2 gene ticks toward impaired vision, but when gene expression was boosted, age-related visual function improved

A lengthy-named gene called Elongation of Very Long Chain Fatty Acids Protein 2 or ELOVL2 is an established biomarker of age. In a new paper, published online...

16.01.2020 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Scientists at TU Freiberg develop process for removing microplastics from wastewater

Together with partners from industry, the TU Bergakademie Freiberg will develop an innovative solution over the next two years to purify industrial wastewater and remove environmentally harmful microplastics. The process is also to be applied in the municipal sector at a later date.

Microplastics are becoming more and more widespread, especially in water. The term "microplastics" refers to plastic particles ranging in size from a few...

16.01.2020 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

How Cells Assemble Their Skeleton

Researchers study the formation of microtubules

Microtubules, filamentous structures within the cell, are required for many important processes, including cell division and intracellular transport. A...

16.01.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

3D Printing: New high-Tech Device for Bremen Material Scientists

The scientific location Bremen is happy to work together for outstanding innovation – as is the case in material research. The MAPEX Center for Material and Processes at the University of Bremen has established a strong network. This consortium has now been granted 2.2 million euros by the German Research Foundation (DFG) to build a device for 3D laser metal deposition for high throughput development of new alloys and composite materials.

Laser metal deposition (LMD) is an additive, powder-based production process for metals. This type of 3D printings allows for large construction parts and very...

16.01.2020 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

The mysterious movement of water molecules

Water is ubiquitous and essential for life. Nevertheless, experimental information about its behaviour on the atomic level – above all how it interacts with surfaces – is scarce. Thanks to a new experimental method, TU Graz researchers have now delivered insights into the atomic-level movement of water molecules, which they outline in a paper in Nature Communications.

Water is a mysterious substance. Understanding its behaviour on an atomic scale remains a challenge for experimentalists as the light hydrogen and oxygen atoms...

15.01.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Washing machine bacteria: the smell comes from the rubber seal

Almost every household in Germany has a washing machine. But what many owners don't realise is that washing machines, which are supposed to clean textiles, can actually be full of germs. Dampness, heat and a large variety of nutrients create ideal living conditions for the growth of bacteria. Current trends such as washing at low temperatures, water saving programmes and the use of bleach-free liquid detergents, support the growth of germs even further.

"Which bacteria are found in which part of the machine? And what are the factors involved? Those were our initial questions," explains the project leader,...

15.01.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

University of Ottawa tool to democratize nanopore research

A nanopore is a tiny hole in a thin membrane with a diameter of around a billionth of a meter, or about the width of a single DNA molecule. The potential applications of these nanopores are so diverse - from medicine to information technology (IT) - that they could have a major impact on our daily lives. Now a team of researchers at the University of Ottawa is democratizing entry into the field of nanopore research by offering up a unique tool to accelerate the development of new applications and discoveries.

The innovative T.-Cossa Lab, which studies applied single-molecule biophysics, came up with the idea to provide the research community with the protocols,...

15.01.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

A new 'cool' blue

17.01.2020 | Life Sciences

EU-project SONAR: Better batteries for electricity from renewable energy sources

17.01.2020 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Neuromuscular organoid: It’s contracting!

17.01.2020 | Life Sciences

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