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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 255,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 255,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Future electronic components to be printed like newspapers

A new manufacturing technique uses a process similar to newspaper printing to form smoother and more flexible metals for making ultrafast electronic devices.

The low-cost process, developed by Purdue University researchers, combines tools already used in industry for manufacturing metals on a large scale, but uses...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

A smart safe rechargeable zinc ion battery based on sol-gel transition electrolytes

The thermal runaway issue has been a long-standing obstacle impeding the development of high energy density and high power delivery batteries. These batteries would generate a lot of heat in ultrafast charge/discharge process or hazardous conditions, such as overcharging and short-circuit. To dissipate the heat accumulated in the batteries, physical safety designs such as fused disconnect switches, extinguishing agents, and shutdown current collectors have been employed. However, these approaches only provide a one-time protection. There is no provision for these strategies to spontaneously restore the original working condition of batteries once the temperature is cooled down. Therefore, intelligent and active internal safety strategies need to be designed for fabricating smart batteries with dynamic electrochemical performance and self-adaptive response to temperature.

Reversible sol-gel transition hydrogels have received abundant research interests owing to their smart responsibility to ambient temperature. They are normally...

20.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

Modelling data in reverse offers hints for how the arrow of time emerges

Watch a movie backwards and you'll likely get confused - but a quantum computer wouldn't. That's the conclusion of researcher Mile Gu at the Centre for Quantum...

20.07.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

An international team of scientists has discovered a new, exotic form of insulating material with a metallic surface that could enable more efficient electronics or even quantum computing. The researchers developed a new method for analyzing existing chemical compounds that relies on the mathematical properties like symmetry that govern the repeating patterns seen in everyday wallpaper.

"The beauty of topology is that one can apply symmetry principles to find and categorize materials," said B. Andrei Bernevig, a professor of physics at...

20.07.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Computer model predicts how fracturing metallic glass releases energy at the atomic level

Researchers developed a new computer model that shows how metallic glass behaves under stress to one day build better materials.

Metallic glasses -- alloys lacking the crystalline structure normally found in metals -- are an exciting research target for tantalizing applications,...

20.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Relax, just break it

The properties of a solid depend on the arrangement of its atoms, which form a periodic crystal structure. At the nanoscale, arrangements that break this periodic structure can drastically alter the behavior of the material, but this is difficult to measure. Recent advances by scientists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory are starting to unravel this mystery.

Using state-of-the art neutron and synchrotron X-ray scattering, Argonne scientists and their collaborators are helping to answer long-held questions about a...

20.07.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

The genes are not to blame

Individualized dietary recommendations based on genetic information are currently a popular trend. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has systematically analyzed scientific articles and reached the following conclusion: There is no clear evidence for the effect of genetic factors on the consumption of total calories, carbohydrates, and fat. According to the current state of knowledge, the expedience of gene-based dietary recommendations has yet to be proven.

Overweight and obesity have become a global health problem. According to the World Health Organization, 39 percent of adults in EU countries have overweight....

20.07.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Targeting headaches and tumors with nano-submarines

Scientists at the Mainz University Medical Center and the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have developed a new method to enable miniature drug-filled nanocarriers to dock on to immune cells, which in turn attack tumors. In the future, this may lead to targeted treatment that can largely eliminate damage to healthy tissue. The scientists have recently published their findings in the renowned scientific journal Nature Nanotechnology. Please watch https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZFVnBBWhCro for further information on the way nanocarriers work and function.

In modern medicine, patients receiving medication to treat tumors or for pain therapy are often given drugs that disperse throughout the entire body, even...

20.07.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Global study of world's beaches shows threat to protected areas

A first-of-its-kind survey of the world's sandy shorelines with satellite data found that they have increased slightly on a global scale over the past three decades but decreased in protected marine areas, where many beaches are eroding.

Erosion in protected marine areas could threaten plant and animal species and cultural heritage sites. Worldwide, the study found that 24 percent of Earth's...

19.07.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

New creepy, crawly search and rescue robot developed at Ben-Gurion U

RSTAR can navigate large obstacles and carry payloads necessary for search and rescue operations

A new highly maneuverable search and rescue robot that can creep, crawl and climb over rough terrain and through tight spaces has been developed by Ben-Gurion...

19.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Metal too 'gummy' to cut? Draw on it with a Sharpie or glue stick, science says

Your everyday permanent markers, glue sticks and packing tape may offer a surprisingly low-tech solution to a long-standing nuisance in the manufacturing industry: Making soft and ductile, or so-called "gummy" metals easier to cut.

What makes inks and adhesives effective isn't their chemical content, but their stickiness to the surface of any gummy metal such as nickel, aluminum,...

19.07.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

NSF-supported researchers to present new results on hurricanes and other extreme events

Ecosystem resilience and human well-being topic of ecological sciences conference

The availability of water from underground aquifers is vital to the basic needs of more than 1.5 billion people worldwide.

19.07.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists uncover the role of a protein in production & survival of myelin-forming cells

The discovery is a major step toward understanding the mechanisms of myelin production and the potential for treating certain central nervous system diseases

The nervous system is a complex organ that relies on a variety of biological players to ensure daily function of the human body. Myelin--a membrane produced by...

19.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

In the ocean's twilight zone, tiny organisms may have giant effect on Earth's carbon cycle

Deep in the ocean's twilight zone, swarms of ravenous single-celled organisms may be altering Earth's carbon cycle in ways scientists never expected, according to a new study from Florida State University researchers.

In the area 100 to 1,000 meters below the ocean's surface -- dubbed the twilight zone because of its largely impenetrable darkness -- scientists found that...

19.07.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Lying in a foreign language is easier

It is not easy to tell when someone is lying. This is even more difficult when potential liars speak in a language other than their native tongue. Psychologists of the University of Würzburg investigated why that is so.

Most people don't find it more difficult to lie in a foreign language than in their native tongue. However, things are different when telling the truth: This...

19.07.2018 | Social Sciences | nachricht Read more

NYSCF researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts

Scientists optimize a procedure toward regenerative medicine for bone defects

Scientists from the New York Stem Cell Foundation (NYSCF) Research Institute have developed a new bone engineering technique called Segmental Additive Tissue...

18.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Machine-learning predicted a superhard and high-energy-density tungsten nitride

Although machine learning technique gained amazing success in many aspects, its application in crystal structure predictions and materials design is still under developing. Recently, Prof. Jian Sun's group at the Department of Physics, Nanjing University implemented a machine-learning algorithm into the crystal structure search method. They use a machine learning algorithm to fit a model to describe the potential energy surface and use it to filter the crystal structures initially. This can effectively enhance the search efficiency of crystal structure prediction.

On the other hand, hybrid compounds of transition metals and light elements, especially transition metal nitrides have been widely studied for their high...

18.07.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Why might reading make myopic?

About half of the students finishing high school in Germany are myopic. In myopia, the eye grows too long, and the focus of the image is in front of the retina. The visual scene is out of focus when people are looking at a distance. Myopia is the prize to pay for good education - statistically, one year of education makes about a quarter diopter more myopic. Myopia is increasing worldwide, since a solid education becomes more and more important.

It is known that myopia develops later when children are more outside before school and are exposed to bright illumination. What exactly makes them myopic when...

18.07.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Pollen taxi for bacteria

A wide range of airborne substances can cause respiratory problems for asthma sufferers. These include bacteria and their components, which can trigger inflammations. How they become airborne has not been fully explained up to now. A science team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Helmholtz Zentrum München (HMGU) has shown that pollen from the mugwort plant is the main vector for bacteria and that this combination renders the pollen more aggressive. This, however, is not the case in certain Alpine regions such as Davos.

Over a period of five years, the TUM team along with colleagues from CK-CARE (Christine Kühne – Center for Allergy Research and Education, Davos) took daily...

18.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Biological signalling processes in intelligent materials

Researchers are developing innovative biohybrid systems with information processing functionality

Scientists from the University of Freiburg have developed materials systems that are composed of biological components and polymer materials and are capable of...

18.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Study suggests buried Internet infrastructure at risk as sea levels rise

Thousands of miles of buried fiber optic cable in densely populated coastal regions of the United States may soon be inundated by rising seas, according to a new study by researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Oregon.

The study, presented here today (July 16, 2018) at a meeting of internet network researchers, portrays critical communications infrastructure that could be...

18.07.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

What happens when we heat the atomic lattice of a magnet all of a sudden?

Magnets have fascinated humans for several thousand years and enabled the age of digital data storage. They occur in various flavors. Ferrimagnets form the largest class of magnets and consist of two types of atoms. Similar to a compass needle, each atom exhibits a little magnetic moment, also called spin, which arises from the rotation of the atom's electrons about their own axes. In a ferrimagnet, the magnetic moments point in opposite directions for the two types of atoms (see panel A). Thus, the total magnetization is the sum of all magnetic moments of type 1 (M1), blue arrows) and type 2 (M2), green arrows). Due to the opposite direction, the magnitude of the total magnetization is M1-M2.

When an insulating ferrimagnet is heated, the heat is first deposited in the atomic lattice which causes the atoms to move randomly around their cold...

18.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Lateral gene transfer enables chemical protection of beetles against antagonistic fungi

Jumping genes in symbionts explain how a beetle and a marine tunicate are protected by highly similar compounds

Like all other living organisms, animals face the challenge of fending off enemies. Using chemical weaponry can be an effective strategy to stay alive. Instead...

18.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Microscopic trampoline may help create networks of quantum computers

A microscopic trampoline could help engineers to overcome a major hurdle for quantum computers, researchers from the University of Colorado Boulder and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) report in a new study.

Scientists at JILA, a joint institute of CU Boulder and NIST, have developed a device that uses a small plate to absorb microwave energy and bounce it into...

17.07.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

A smart safe rechargeable zinc ion battery based on sol-gel transition electrolytes

20.07.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Reversing cause and effect is no trouble for quantum computers

20.07.2018 | Information Technology

Princeton-UPenn research team finds physics treasure hidden in a wallpaper pattern

20.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

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