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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 261,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 261,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Fraunhofer IDMT demonstrates its method for acoustic quality inspection at »Sensor+Test 2019« in Nürnberg

From June 25th to 27th 2019, the Fraunhofer Institute for Digital Media Technology IDMT in Ilmenau (Germany) will be presenting a new solution for acoustic quality inspection allowing contact-free, non-destructive testing of manufactured parts and components. The method which has reached Technology Readiness Level 6 already, is currently being successfully tested in practical use together with a number of industrial partners.

Reducing machine downtime, manufacturing defects, and excessive scrap

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Shell increases versatility of nanowires

Nanowires promise to make LEDs more colorful and solar cells more efficient, in addition to speeding up computers. That is, provided that the tiny semiconductors convert electric energy into light, and vice versa, at the right wavelengths. Researchers at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have managed to produce nanowires with operating wavelengths that can be freely selected over a wide range – simply by altering the shell structure. Fine-tuned nanowires could take on several roles in an optoelectronic component. That would make the components more powerful, more cost-effective, and easier to integrate, as the team reports in Nature Communications.

Nanowires are extremely versatile. The tiny elements can be used for miniaturized photonic and electronic components in nanotechnology. Applications include...

26.06.2019 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Hubble finds tiny 'electric soccer balls' in space, helps solve interstellar mystery

Scientists using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have confirmed the presence of electrically-charged molecules in space shaped like soccer balls, shedding light on the mysterious contents of the interstellar medium (ISM) - the gas and dust that fills interstellar space.

Since stars and planets form from collapsing clouds of gas and dust in space, "The diffuse ISM can be considered as the starting point for the chemical...

26.06.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New combination therapy established as safe and effective for prostate cancer

Targeted treatment offers potential options for men with progressive disease

A novel therapy using two targeted treatments for prostate cancer has been shown to maximize efficacy while reducing side effects according to research...

26.06.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Cyanide compounds discovered in meteorites may hold clues to the origin of life

Cyanide and carbon monoxide are both deadly poisons to humans, but compounds containing iron, cyanide, and carbon monoxide discovered in carbon-rich meteorites by a team of scientists at Boise State University and NASA may have helped power life on early Earth.

The extraterrestrial compounds found in meteorites resemble the active site of hydrogenases, which are enzymes that provide energy to bacteria and archaea by...

26.06.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New unprinting method can help recycle paper and curb environmental costs

Rutgers-led study shows the benefits of removing toner with pulses of intense xenon light

Imagine if your printer had an "unprint" button that used pulses of light to remove toner, curbing environmental impacts compared with conventional paper...

26.06.2019 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Looking for freshwater in all the snowy places

Snowflakes that cover mountains or linger under tree canopies are a vital freshwater resource for over a billion people around the world. To help determine how much freshwater is stored in snow, a team of NASA-funded researchers is creating a computer-based tool that simulates the best way to detect snow and measure its water content from space.

Snow's water content, or snow water equivalent (SWE) is a "holy grail for many hydrologists," said Bart Forman, the project's principal investigator and a...

26.06.2019 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Novel model for studying intestinal parasite could advance vaccine development

University of Pennsylvania researchers showed that mice could be protected from the infection with a live attenuated vaccine

The intestinal parasite Cryptosporidium, which causes a diarrheal disease, is very good at infecting humans. It's the leading cause of waterborne disease from...

26.06.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Earthquake impact on submarine slopes: subtle erosion versus significant strengthening

Active margins, where an oceanic plate slides under a continental plate, may cause the largest earthquakes and tsunamis on earth. Besides their catastrophic impact on coastal communities, they are also known for shifting large amounts of sediments from the margin slopes into deep ocean trenches. Now a study led by geologists from the University of Innsbruck discovered for the very first time direct evidence of earthquake-triggered sediment erosion of surface sediments on a submarine slope close to the rupture area of the great 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake.

Whereas most previous research assumed that sediment transport by earthquakes only happened by sliding of sediment packages (i.e. submarine landslides), that...

26.06.2019 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

New contents: Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected

An international team of researchers involving members of the University of Basel’s Biozentrum challenges the conventional understanding of the cause of Parkinson’s disease. The researchers have shown that the inclusions in the brain’s neurons, characteristic of Parkinson‘s disease, are comprised of a membranous medley rather than protein fibrils. The recently published study in “Nature Neuroscience” raises new questions about the etiology of Parkinson’s disease.

Parkinson’s disease is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases worldwide. This disease is typically accompanied by motor defects such as the tremor...

26.06.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Earth observation network PollyNet gets new station in Asia

The Earth observation network PollyNet is strengthened: The sixth station of the worldwide atmosphere network starts operations on Wednesday in Dushanbe, the capital of Tajikistan. The new station is the first in Central Asia, within the global dust belt that stretches from Morocco to China.
PollyNet is a network of light radars (lidar) that use laser beams to explore the atmosphere from the ground. With its measurements it contributes to the European research infrastructure ACTRIS, which investigates aerosols, clouds and trace gases. It is coordinated by the Leibniz Institute for Tropospheric Research (TROPOS) in Leipzig.

PollyNet stations in Finland, Germany, Greece, Poland, Portugal and South Korea are already continuously measuring dust in the atmosphere by laser. Further...

26.06.2019 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

For a better climate in the cities: Start-up develops maintenance-free, evergreen moss façades

Air pollution is increasing in many cities. It is also getting warmer and warmer and flooding occurs during heavy rain because the surfaces are sealed. Therefore, new concepts are needed to ensure that cities remain livable for their inhabitants, including more green spaces that ensure a pleasant climate and keep the air clean. The greening of façades is also important. A start-up of Technische Universität Kaiserslautern has developed a system for green façades that is maintenance-free and, thanks to moss, self-greening. The founders market this system through their company "Artificial Ecosystems". For their idea, they were awarded 1st place in the Rhineland-Palatinate Ideas Prize 2019.

Around 400 million years ago, mosses formed on Earth. Unlike other plants, they do not have roots. "They filter their nutrients out of the air," says botanist...

25.06.2019 | Architecture and Construction | nachricht Read more

An ion channel with a doorkeeper: The pH of calcium ions controls ion channel opening

Biochemists identified the structure of a ring located at the opening of the TRPML2 ion channel that can be blocked by calcium ions

Ion channels are pores in the membrane of cells or cell organelles. They allow positively or negatively charged particles, so-called ions, to be transported...

25.06.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Cooling with the sun

Can you cool with waste heat? Sure. A Swiss research project involving Empa, which ended in November, demonstrated this in an impressive way. Now a large-scale EU project is starting: industrial cooling – thanks to the Spanish sun.

Every now and so often heating something up is unavoidable. Potato soup or risotto, tomato sauce or chocolate pudding – all unfeasible without heat. A small...

25.06.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Robocabs: The mobility of the future?

Study on user acceptance for autonomous mobility concepts

Even if the technology has as yet only been tested in prototypes on test routes, autonomous driving will apparently be possible in the near future. How exactly...

25.06.2019 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Skipping Meat on Occasion May Protect Against Type 2 Diabetes

People who eat less live longer and healthier lives – many studies point out the positive effect of (intermittent) fasting. However, besides calorie reduction, the quantitative relationship of the individual food components also plays an important role. Scientists at DIfE, a partner of the German Center for Diabetes Research, have now demonstrated in the animal model that the sole restriction of the amino acid methionine* prevents the onset of type 2 diabetes. Their results were published in the FASEB Journal.

In earlier studies, the research team of the Department of Experimental Diabetology at the German Institute of Human Nutrition (DIfE) had already discovered...

25.06.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Symbiotic upcycling: Turning “low value” compounds into biomass

Scientists discover the first known sulfur-oxidizing symbiont to be entirely heterotrophic.

Kentron, a bacterial symbiont of ciliates, turns cellular waste products into biomass. It is the first known sulfur-oxidizing symbiont to be entirely...

25.06.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New Therapy Promotes Vascular Repair Following Stroke

Following a stroke, antibodies that inhibit the signaling molecule Nogo-A can help repair blood vessels in the affected brain regions. This also promotes the regaining of motor functions, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown in a mouse model. The study opens up new avenues for treatment.

Each year, around 16,000 people in Switzerland and 15 million people worldwide suffer a stroke. Two thirds of those affected die or remain in permanent need of...

25.06.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Novel approach to self-assembling mobile micromachines

How the components come together depends on their design and shape and the resulting dielectrophoretic forces when exposed to an electric field.

Building a robot with many different components is a challenging task, even more so at the micro scale. Very convenient, if the parts self-assemble.

25.06.2019 | Machine Engineering | nachricht Read more

'Sneezing' plants contribute to disease proliferation

Virginia Tech researchers discovered that wheat plants "sneezing" off condensation can vastly impact the spread of spore-borne diseases, such as wheat leaf rust, which can cause crop yield losses of up to 20 percent or more in the United States and higher average losses in less developed agricultural nations.

The study, published June 19, and featured on the cover of the Journal of the Royal Society Interface, is part of a three-year grant obtained from the U.S....

24.06.2019 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Researchers find new mutation in the leptin gene

'Hunger hormone' imbalance can trigger obesity

The global obesity epidemic is so far-reaching it now has an overarching name: globesity. Texas Biomed Staff Scientist Raul Bastarrachea, M.D., is part of a...

24.06.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Non-invasive view into the heart

The non-invasive measurement of blood flow to the heart using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is on par with cardiac catheterization. This was the result of an international study published in the current issue of the New England Journal of Medicine and headed by researchers from Goethe University.

For patients with chest pain and presumably stable coronary heart disease (CHD), therapy depends primarily on how constricted the arteries that support the...

24.06.2019 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Fingerprint spectroscopy within a millisecond

To guarantee high quality pharmaceuticals, manufacturers need not only to control the purity and concentration of their own products, but also those of their suppliers. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Applied Solid State Physics IAF have developed a measuring system capable of identifying a wide variety of chemical and pharmaceutical substances remotely and in real time. It is perfect for the use in the pharmaceutical, chemical and food industry.

Especially for pharmaceutical and food productions a continuous control of ingredients is indispensable. Usually, this would be done by a sampling and a...

24.06.2019 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Straight to the heart

An international team of researchers are seeking to explore the heart at a depth that was previously impossible. They have now received a grant of nearly four million US dollars from the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative – as one of the 38 Seed Networks working on the Human Cell Atlas. MDC researcher Norbert Hübner is co-coordinator of the project.

At one time or another, everyone discovers that matters of the heart can be quite tricky. But on the other hand, most of us take our heartbeat for granted....

24.06.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Shell increases versatility of nanowires

26.06.2019 | Materials Sciences

Hubble finds tiny 'electric soccer balls' in space, helps solve interstellar mystery

26.06.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

New combination therapy established as safe and effective for prostate cancer

26.06.2019 | Health and Medicine

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