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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 258,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 258,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule

Team joins national network focused on neurodegenerative disorders

Scientists who recently identified the molecular start of Alzheimer's disease have used that finding to determine that it should be possible to forecast which...

12.12.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

CCNY-Yale researchers make shape shifting cell breakthrough

A new computational model developed by researchers from The City College of New York and Yale gives a clearer picture of the structure and mechanics of soft, shape-changing cells that could provide a better understanding of cancerous tumor growth, wound healing, and embryonic development.

Mark D. Shattuck, professor of physics at City College's Benjamin Levich Institute, and researchers at Yale developed the new efficient computational model. It...

12.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Pain: Perception and motor impulses arise in the brain independently of one another

Pain is a negative feeling that we want to get rid of as soon as possible. In order to protect our bodies, we react for example by withdrawing the hand. This action is usually understood as the consequence of the perception of pain. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now shown that perception, the impulse to act and provision of energy to do so take place in the brain simultaneously and not, as was expected, one after the other.

Led by Markus Ploner, Heisenberg Professor for Human Pain Research, scientists from the Department of Neurology of the university hospital TUM Klinikum rechts...

12.12.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

How skin cells protect themselves against stress

Cell biologists at the University of Münster have developed a new method for measuring how mechanical forces in cells are processed. The results have been published in the journal “Nature Communications”.

The skin is our largest organ, and, among other things, it provides protection against mechanical impacts. To ensure this protection, skin cells have to be...

12.12.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Copper compound as promising quantum computing unit

Chemists at Friedrich Schiller University Jena (Germany) synthesise molecule as possible component for quantum computers

Quantum computers could vastly increase the capabilities of IT systems, bringing major changes worldwide. However, there is still a long way to go before such...

12.12.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New approach towards an improved treatment of anxiety disorders

Traumatic experiences can become deeply entrenched in a person's memory. How can fears following a traumatic event be reduced in the long term and prevented from becoming a permanent stress-related disorder? Researchers at the Mainz University Medical Center have recently shed new light on these questions. The key to their approach lies in firmly anchoring new, positive experiences in the person's memory. As in classical treatment, traumatized patients would first have to be exposed to their fear-inducing stimuli to learn that these stimuli are often harmless. This experience would then be made durable using a safe and simple drug treatment.

The researchers have been analyzing more closely the mental processes that underlie the resulting positive memory formation processes. Their findings, now...

12.12.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Smelling the forest – not the trees

New study by the University of Konstanz: Animals are much better at smelling a complex “soup” of odorants rather than a single pure ingredient

As part of an international team, the University of Konstanz investigates how olfactory receptors and brain structures cope with mixtures and single odorants....

12.12.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Innovative Infrared heat reduces energy consumption in coating packaging for food

Retrofitting with modern emitters simplifies polymer coating

An infrared system from Heraeus Noblelight has dramatically reduced energy costs in the coating of board for food packaging at the Stroud factory of The...

12.12.2018 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

12.12.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Obtaining polyester from plant oil

University of Konstanz chemist Professor Stefan Mecking publishes a new catalysis concept for obtaining polyester from castor oil

The development of future technologies that are not based on mineral oil and can be used for producing chemicals and plastics is one of the major tasks in...

12.12.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Electronic evidence of non-Fermi liquid behaviors in an iron-based superconductor

It is a general consensus that understanding of the normal state is a pre-requisite for understanding the superconductivity mechanism.

In conventional superconductors, superconductivity emerges from the normal state where the low energy excitations can be well described by the Fermi liquid...

11.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

11.12.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

NIST's antenna evaluation method could help boost 5G network capacity and cut costs

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a method for evaluating and selecting optimal antenna designs for future fifth-generation (5G) cellphones, other wireless devices and base stations.

The new NIST method could boost 5G wireless network capacity and reduce costs.

11.12.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Some brain tumors may respond to immunotherapy, new study suggests

Immunotherapy has proved effective in treating a number of cancers, but brain tumors have remained stubbornly resistant. Now, a new study suggests that a slow-growing brain tumor arising in patients affected by neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) may be vulnerable to immunotherapy, which gives the immune system a boost in fighting cancer.

The findings, made by an international consortium led by researchers at Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons, were published online...

11.12.2018 | Studies and Analyses | nachricht Read more

Researchers image atomic structure of important immune regulator

Understanding structure of human TIM-3 provides new insights for cancer and autoimmune drug development

A new study by investigators from Brigham and Women's Hospital provides a biophysical and structural assessment of a critical immune regulating protein called...

11.12.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Physicists edge closer to controlling chemical reactions

A team of researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and Aarhus University in Denmark has developed an algorithm for predicting the effect of an external electromagnetic field on the state of complex molecules. The algorithm, which is based on a theory developed earlier by the same team, predicts tunneling ionization rates of molecules. This refers to the probability that an electron will bypass the potential barrier and escape from its parent molecule. The new algorithm, presented in a paper in the Journal of Chemical Physics, enables researchers to look inside large polyatomic molecules, observe and potentially control electron motion therein.

Physicists use powerful lasers to reveal the electron structure of molecules. To do this, they illuminate a molecule and analyze its re-emission spectra and...

11.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

UA-led OSIRIS-REx discovers water on asteroid, confirms Bennu as excellent mission target

Observations made by the spacecraft during its approach of Bennu reveal that that the asteroid interacted with water in its early history and is an excellent specimen for the mission, which is slated to return a sample of surface material to Earth in 2023

From August through early December, the OSIRIS-REx spacecraft aimed three of its science instruments toward Bennu and began making the mission's first...

11.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Bioenergy cropland expansion could be as bad for biodiversity as climate change

Nature is one of the beneficiaries of climate protection measures, among which bioenergy has long been touted as a potential savior. However, to reach the 1.5 degree goal, bioenergy crops will have to be cultivated on a large scale. New models show that this will lead to the destruction of more habitats of vertebrate species than would benefit from lessened climate change effects. The study by researchers from the Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre, the Technical University Munich and the Durham University is published this week in “PNAS.” The presumed advantages of such climate protection measures would thus be of no benefit to biodiversity.

To prevent global temperatures from rising by more than 1.5 degrees compared to the pre-industrial era, the amount of carbon released into the atmosphere...

11.12.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How glial cells develop in the brain from neural precursor cells

Two types of cells are active in the brain: nerve cells and glial cells. The latter have long been regarded primarily as supportive cells, but it is increasingly recognized that they play an active role in the communication between neurons in the brain. What is more, according to current research, glial cells are also involved in the development of neurodegenerative diseases. A research team led by Prof. Benedikt Berninger of the Institute of Physiological Chemistry at the Mainz University Medical Center has now produced new findings that may also help identifying what goes awry with glia in neurodegeneration. They studied how glial cells develop in the brain from neural precursor cells.

The researchers discovered that differentiation involves three stages and that three proteins in the cell nucleus, so-called transcription factors, play a key...

11.12.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Small but ver­sat­ile; key play­ers in the mar­ine ni­tro­gen cycle can util­ize cy­anate and urea

The ammonia oxidizing archaea, or Thaumarchaeota, are amongst the most abundant marine microorganisms. Yet, we are still discovering which factors allow them to thrive in the ocean. A research team from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen and the University of Vienna was now able to show that marine Thaumarchaeota have a broader metabolism than previously thought. The results are published in the journal Nature Microbiology.

The Thaumarchaeota play a key role in the marine nitrogen cycle. They gain energy for growth by converting ammonia, which is the most reduced form of inorganic...

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

Mirrored slides now allow significantly sharper images / 20x better resolution than an ordinary light microscope - Scientists at the University of Würzburg have been able to boost current super-resolution microscopy by a novel tweak. They coated the glass cover slip as part of the sample carrier with tailor-made biocompatible nanosheets that create a "mirror effect". This method shows that localizing single emitters in front of a metal-dielectric coating leads to higher precision, brightness and contrast in Single Molecule Localization Microscopy (SMLM). The study was published in the Nature journal "Light: Science and Applications".

The sharpness of a light microscope is limited by physical conditions: structures that are closer together than 0.2 thousandths of a millimeter blur into each...

10.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

Researchers at Carnegie Mellon University have used nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy to probe the hydrogen bonds that modulate the chemical reactivity of enzymes, catalysts and biomimetic complexes. The technique could lead to the development of better catalysts for use in a wide range of fields. The findings were published as a "Very Important Paper" in the Dec. 3 issue of Angewandte Chemie and featured on the journal's back cover.

Hydrogen bonds are among the most fundamental interactions found in biology and chemistry. They are responsible for many of the chemically important properties...

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

ETRI exchanged quantum information on daylight in a free-space quantum key distribution

ETRI successfully exchanged quantum information on daylight in a free-space quantum key distribution

The Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) has reported a successful free-space quantum key distribution (QKD) in daylight with the...

10.12.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

New discoveries predict ability to forecast dementia from single molecule

12.12.2018 | Health and Medicine

CCNY-Yale researchers make shape shifting cell breakthrough

12.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Pain: Perception and motor impulses arise in the brain independently of one another

12.12.2018 | Health and Medicine

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