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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 258,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 258,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Bifacial Stem Cells Produce Wood and Bast

Heidelberg researchers study one of the most important growth processes on Earth

So-called bifacial stem cells are responsible for one of the most critical growth processes on Earth – the formation of wood.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

A New Home for Optical Solitons

Laser physicists based at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics run by the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics and the Ludwig-Maximilian University have, for the first time, generated dissipative solitons in passive, free-space resonators.

Solitons are the most stable of all waves. Under conditions that result in the dispersion of all other waveforms, a soliton will continue undisturbed on its...

23.01.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Graphene and related materials safety: human health and the environment

As the drive to commercialise graphene continues, it is important that all safety aspects are thoroughly researched and understood. The Graphene Flagship project has a dedicated Work Package studying the impact of graphene and related materials on our health, as well as their environmental impact. This enables safety by design to become a core part of innovation.

Researches and companies are currently using a range of materials such as few layered graphene, graphene oxide and heterostructures. The first step to assess...

23.01.2019 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Blood test shows promise for early detection of severe lung-transplant rejection

New tool that uses DNA sequencing could improve transplant outcomes and save lives

Researchers have developed a simple blood test that can detect when a newly transplanted lung is being rejected by a patient, even when no outward signs of the...

23.01.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Evolution of signaling molecules opens door to new sepsis therapy approaches

Small infections can be fatal: Millions of people die each year from sepsis, an overreaction of the immune system. A new immune signaling molecule, designed by a research team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), now provides the basis for potential new approaches in sepsis therapy.

The numbers are alarming: According to estimates by the World Health Organization (WHO), around six million people die every year from sepsis. The disease,...

23.01.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Did you know that skis and snowboards benefit from Infrared heat?

Not only should skis and snowboards look appealing, they also need to be built to withstand the rigors of snow and ice. Almost all popular skis and snowboards contain composite materials, which are manufactured by Isosport in Austria.

For the modern, high-quality composite fabrics rovings and fabrics made of glass and carbon fiber are impregnated with high-quality epoxy resins.

23.01.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Collision of individual atoms leads to twofold change of angular momentum

Thanks to new technology, it is possible to retain individual atoms, move them in a targeted manner or change their condition. Kaiserslautern physicists also work with this system. In a recent study, they investigated the consequences of the collision of two atoms in a weak magnetic field at low temperature. For the first time they have discovered that atoms, carrying their angular momentum in individual packets (quanta), thereby exchange two packets. It was also shown that the interaction strength between the atoms can be controlled. This is of interest for investigating chemical reactions, for example. The paper was published in the journal Physical Review Letters.

Until a few decades ago it was unthinkable for physicists to carry out experiments with individual atomic particles. Erwin Schrödinger, one of the pioneers of...

23.01.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

The healing effect of radon

Natural thermal water that contains radon has been used for over 100 years to treat chronic degenerative, inflammatory and musculoskeletal conditions. Most patients experience a significant reduction in pain after treatment with radon, but the molecular mechanisms behind the treatment are largely unexplored. In the placebo-controlled RAD-ON02 study (EudraCT No. 2016-002085-31) in accordance with the German Medicinal Products Act (AMG), the immunological and pain-relieving effects of serial radon baths is now being investigated in patients with musculoskeletal conditions as part of a collaboration between Universitätsklinikum Erlangen and Kurort-Forschungsverein Bad Steben.

Arthritis, osteoarthritis and heel spurs are some of the most common chronic degenerative and musculoskeletal conditions that cause pain and inflammation and...

23.01.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Helping to memorize information more efficiently using Artificial Intelligence

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems and the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems develop algorithms which optimize the well known spaced repetition method used for memorizing educational material. By using optimal spacing time, the learning process becomes as efficient as possible. Their findings were published in the prestigious journal PNAS on Tuesday.

Flashback to the days when one tried learning a second language. Whether adult or child – a person’s ability to remember those nouns, verbs and adjectives...

23.01.2019 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

How our cellular antennas are formed

UNIGE researchers have succeeded in reconstructing in vitro the frame of a cell's cilium; an additional step to understand the pathologies associated with ciliary dysfunctions, from brain malformations to kidney or liver diseases

Most of our cells contain an immobile primary cilium, an antenna used to transfer information from the surrounding environment. Some cells also have many...

22.01.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Proposed engineering method could help make buildings and bridges safer

Researchers at Kanazawa University discover how to make pearlite stretch or contract more by changing the distance between irregularities in atomic arrangements along its nanolayer boundaries

Pearlitic steel, or pearlite, is one of the strongest materials in the world and can be made into thin and long wires. The strength of pearlite allows it to...

22.01.2019 | Architecture and Construction | nachricht Read more

Mechanical engineers develop process to 3D print piezoelectric materials

New printing technique and materials could be used to develop intelligent materials and self-adaptive infrastructures and transducers

The piezoelectric materials that inhabit everything from our cell phones to musical greeting cards may be getting an upgrade thanks to work discussed in the...

22.01.2019 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Energizing the immune system to eat cancer

Abramson Cancer Center study identifies method of priming macrophages to boost anti-tumor response

Immune cells called macrophages are supposed to serve and protect, but cancer has found ways to put them to sleep. Now researchers at the Abramson Cancer...

22.01.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Early Prediction of Alzheimer’s Progression in Blood

Years before symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease manifest, the brain starts changing and neurons are slowly degraded. Scientists at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), the Hertie Institute for Clinical Brain Research (HIH) and the University Hospital Tübingen now show that a protein found in the blood can be used to precisely monitor disease progression long before first clinical signs appear. This blood marker offers new possibilities for testing therapies. The study was carried out in cooperation with an international research team and published in the journal “Nature Medicine”.

“The fact that there is still no effective treatment for Alzheimer’s is partly because current therapies start much too late,” says Mathias Jucker, a senior...

22.01.2019 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Münster University researchers develop new synthesis method for producing fluorinated piperidines

A team of chemists at the University of Münster led by Prof. Frank Glorius have developed a new, simple synthetic method for producing fluorinated piperidines –which had previously been very difficult. These compounds play a major role in the development of new active ingredients. The results have just been published in the online edition of the journal “Nature Chemistry”.

Synthetic molecules are essential for many products in our lives: medicines, crop protection agents or special materials such as Teflon. These molecules have...

22.01.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New blood vessel system discovered in bones

A previously unknown network of fine capillaries directly connecting the bone marrow with the circulation of the periosteum has been discovered by a team of scientists led by Prof. Matthias Gunzer and Dr. Anja Hasenberg from the Institute for Experimental Immunology and Imaging at the University Hospital of the University Duisburg-Essen (UDE) in Germany. The group was further supported by research institutes in Erlangen, Jena, Berlin, Dresden and Berne (Switzerland). Their results have now been published in the prestigious international journal “Nature Metabolism”.

Bones are very hard organs. Still they do possess a tight meshwork of blood vessels in their inner cavity, where the bone marrow is located, as well as on the...

22.01.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Discovery of bacterial signature of intestinal disease

Researchers from the Department of Biomedical Research of the University of Bern and the University Clinic of Visceral Surgery and Medicine of the Inselspital Bern, Switzerland, have discovered that changes in the composition of the intestinal bacteria in patients with chronic inflammatory bowel disease affect the severity of the disease and the success of therapy. The advance provides an important basis to improve treatment of these diseases.

Enormous numbers of bacteria live in our intestines: they normally cause no disease and they are essential if we are to remain healthy.

22.01.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists discover new 'architecture' in corn

LSU scientists' findings may improve biofuel production

New research on the U.S.'s most economically important agricultural plant - corn - has revealed a different internal structure of the plant than previously...

21.01.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Broadband achromatic metalens focuses light regardless of polarization

New design doubles the efficiency of the metalens

We live in a polarized world. No, we aren't talking about politics -- we're talking about light. Much of the light we see and use is partially polarized,...

21.01.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Nuclear actin filaments determine T helper cell function

Novel mechanism that enables CD4 T cells to selectively induce expression of cytokines. Study by the Fackler laboratory at University Hospital Heidelberg, Germany.

The success of immune reactions in response to pathogen infection critically depends on the generation of high affinity antibodies that can neutralize the...

21.01.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists turn carbon emissions into usable energy

A recent study, affiliated with UNIST has developed a system that produces electricity and hydrogen (H2) while eliminating carbon dioxide (CO2), which is the main contributor of global warming.

Published This breakthrough has been led by Professor Guntae Kim in the School of Energy and Chemical Engineering at UNIST in collaboration with Professor...

21.01.2019 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Lifting the veil on the black hole at the heart of our Galaxy

Including the powerful ALMA into an array of telescopes for the first time, astronomers have found that the emission from the supermassive black hole Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*) at the center of our Galaxy comes from a smaller region than previously thought. This may indicate that a radio jet from Sgr A* is pointed almost directly towards the Earth.

So far, a foggy cloud of hot gas has prevented astronomers from making sharp images of the supermassive black hole Sgr A* and causing doubt on its true nature....

21.01.2019 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

How staying in shape is vital for reproductive success

New research reveals that cells must keep their shape and proportions to successfully reproduce through cell division

Cells must keep their shape and proportions to successfully reproduce through cell division, finds new research from the Francis Crick Institute and King's...

21.01.2019 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New Material to Push the Boundaries of Silicon-Based Electronics

The electronics market is growing constantly and so is the demand for increasingly compact and efficient power electronic systems. The predominant electronic components based on silicon will in foreseeable future no longer be able to meet the increasing industrial requirements.This is why scientists from the university of Freiburg, the Sustainability Center Freiburg and the Fraunhofer-Gesellschaft have joined forces in order to explore a new material structure that may be better suited for future power electronics.

The recently launched project »Research of Functional Semiconductor Structures for Energy Efficient Power Electronics« (in short »Power Electronics 2020+«)...

21.01.2019 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

A New Home for Optical Solitons

23.01.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Graphene and related materials safety: human health and the environment

23.01.2019 | Materials Sciences

Blood test shows promise for early detection of severe lung-transplant rejection

23.01.2019 | Life Sciences

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