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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 255,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 255,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Subaru Telescope helps pinpoint origin of ultra-high energy neutrino

Today, an international team announced that for the first time in the world they had identified the source object of an ultra-high energy neutrino.

On September 22, 2017 the IceCube experiment at Amundsen Scott station in Antarctica detected an ultra-high energy neutrino coming from outer space and was...

16.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Barium ruthenate: A high-yield, easy-to-handle perovskite catalyst for the oxidation of sulfides

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology have developed a ruthenium-based perovskite catalyst[1] that shows strong activity even at low temperatures (down to 313 K). The reusable catalyst does not require additives, meaning that it can prevent the formation of toxic by-products. The oxidation of sulfides is a commercially important process with broad applications ranging from chemicals production to environmental management.

A research group led by Keigo Kamata and Michikazu Hara of Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) has succeeded in developing a barium ruthenate (BaRuO3)...

16.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New research calculates capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon

Gains of only 22 percent over the next six decades represent best-case scenario

Researchers have calculated the capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon in a detailed analysis that for the first time integrates the effects of...

16.07.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Nano-kirigami: 'Paper-cut' provides model for 3D intelligent nanofabrication

Kirigami (also called "paper-cuts" or "jianzhi") is one of the most traditional Chinese folk arts. It is widely used in window decorations, gift cards, festivals, and ceremonies, etc. Kirigami involves cutting and folding flat objects into 3D shapes. Recently, the techniques of this ancient art have been used in various scientific and technological fields, including designs for solar arrays, biomedical devices and micro-/nano- electromechanical systems (MEMS/NEMS).

Dr. LI Jiafang, from the Institute of Physics (IOP), Chinese Academy of Sciences, has recently formed an international team to apply kirigami techniques to...

16.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New players, standardization and digitalization for more rail freight transport

Transporting more freight by rail is a critical factor in protecting the climate, but the volume of freight transported by rail is actually declining in the majority of EU countries. Fraunhofer ISI examined the political and economic changes needed to shift more freight onto rails.

In the LowCarb-RFC project, the Fraunhofer Institute for Systems and Innovation Research ISI and its project partners are exploring how European rail freight...

16.07.2018 | Transportation and Logistics | nachricht Read more

Researchers discover natural product that could lead to new class of commercial herbicide

Bioinformatics approach used to uncover the weed killer could also be used to find new drugs for medications

A garden can be a competitive environment. Plants and unseen microorganisms in the soil all need precious space to grow. And to gain that space, a microbe...

16.07.2018 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Colorectal cancer risk factors decrypted

Cologne researchers find the connection between obesity and tumor growth

According to the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer, colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer type in men and the...

16.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

The secret sulfate code that lets the bad Tau in

Vampires can turn humans into vampires, but to enter a human's house, they must be invited in. Researchers at the UT Southwestern Medical Center, writing in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, have uncovered details of how cells invite inside corrupted proteins that can turn normal proteins corrupt, leading to neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Understanding the molecular details of how these proteins spread from cell to cell could lead to therapies to halt disease progression.

Alzheimer's and Parkinson's are associated with particular proteins in the brain misfolding, aggregating, and inducing normal proteins to misfold and...

16.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Theorists publish highest-precision prediction of muon magnetic anomaly

Latest calculation based on how subatomic muons interact with all known particles comes out just in time for comparison with precision measurements at new 'Muon g-2' experiment

Theoretical physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Brookhaven National Laboratory and their collaborators have just released the most precise...

16.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

Brown University researchers and collaborators from Tsinghua University in China have shown that nanoclusters made from boron and lanthanide elements form highly stable and symmetric structures with interesting magnetic properties.

The findings, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences on Monday, July 9, suggest that these nanoclusters may be useful as molecular...

13.07.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Algae Have Land Genes

The genome of the algae species Chara braunii has been decoded. It already contains the first genetic characteristics that enabled the water plants' evolutionary transition to land.

500 million years ago, the first plants living in water took to land. The genetic adaptations associated with this transition can already be recognized in the...

13.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

First machine learning method capable of accurate extrapolation

Scientists develop new machine learning method that can make robots safer.
New method provides simpler and more intuitive models of physical situations.

Understanding how a robot will react under different conditions is essential to guaranteeing its safe operation. But how do you know what will break a robot...

13.07.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Can ultrashort electron flashes help harvest nuclear energy?

The lab of Fabrizio Carbone at EPFL and their international colleagues have used ultrafast Transmission Electron Microscopy to take attosecond energy-momentum resolved snapshots (1 attosecond = 10-18 or quintillionths of a second) of a free-electron wave function. Though unprecedented in itself, the scientists also used their experimental success to develop a theory of how to create electron flashes within zeptosecond (10-21 of a second) timeframes, using already existing technology. This breakthrough could allow physicists to increase the energy yield of nuclear reactions using coherent control methods, which relies on the manipulation of quantum interference effects with lasers and which has already helped advance fields like spectroscopy, quantum information processing, and laser cooling.

In fact, one of the most elusive phenomena in physics is the excitation of an atom's nucleus by absorption of an electron. The process, known as "nuclear...

13.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

A step closer to single-atom data storage

Despite the rise of solid-state drives, magnetic storage devices such as conventional hard drives and magnetic tapes are still very common. But as our data-storage needs are increasing at a rate of almost 15 million gigabytes per day, scientists are turning to alternative storage devices.

One of these are single-atom magnets: storage devices consisting of individual atoms stuck ("adsorbed") on a surface, each atom able to store a single bit of...

13.07.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

MSU researchers lead team that discovers heaviest known calcium atom

Eight new rare isotopes discovered in total

Researchers from Michigan State University and the RIKEN Nishina Center in Japan discovered eight new rare isotopes of the elements phosphorus, sulfur,...

12.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Simpler interferometer can fine tune even the quickest pulses of light

If you want to get the greatest benefit from a beam of light - whether to detect a distant planet or remedy an aberration in the human eye - you need to be able to measure its beam front information.

Now a University of Rochester research team has devised a much simpler way to measure beams of light-- even powerful, superfast pulsed laser beams that require...

12.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Scientists discover Earth's youngest banded iron formation in western China

Discovery provides evidence of iron-rich seawater much later than previously thought

The banded iron formation, located in western China, has been conclusively dated as Cambrian in age. Approximately 527 million years old, this formation is...

12.07.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Enzyme discovery could help in fight against TB

An enzyme structure discovery made by scientists at the University of Warwick could help to eradicate tuberculosis

Research by a team led by Dr Elizabeth Fullam, has revealed new findings about an enzyme found in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) the bacterium that causes TB.

12.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New computational method for drug discovery

HITS researchers developed tauRAMD, a tool to predict drug-target residence times from short simulations. The method is illustrated on the cover page of July 2018 issue of the Journal of Chemical Theory and Computation, software is freely available.

The design of a drug with a desired duration of action, whether long or short, is usually a complicated and expensive trial-and-error process guided only by a...

12.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Advance warning system via cell phone app: Avoiding extreme weather damage in agriculture

Long droughts, heavy rainfall, hailstorms, cold and late frost – extreme weather events cause substantial damage in the agricultural sector. Researchers at the Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF) are investigating in a new project to what extent such extreme weather events can be better predicted and damage prevented or limited.

The aim of the project funded by the Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture (BMEL) is to develop an extreme weather monitoring and risk assessment system...

12.07.2018 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

12.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

New Control of Cell Division Discovered

When a cell divides, its constituents are usually evenly distributed among the daughter cells. UZH researchers have now identified an enzyme that guarantees that cell constituents that are concentrated in organelles without a membrane are properly distributed. Their discovery opens up new opportunities for the treatment of cancer, neurodegenerative diseases, aging processes and viral infections.

As every cook has experienced: When balsamic vinegar and olive oil are mixed, both liquids separate. Round vinegar drops form, which then float on the surface...

12.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Electrical contact to molecules in semiconductor structures established for the first time

Electrical circuits are constantly being scaled down and extended with specific functions. A new method now allows electrical contact to be established with simple molecules on a conventional silicon chip. The technique promises to bring advances in sensor technology and medicine, as reported in the journal Nature by chemists from the University of Basel and researchers from IBM Research – Zurich in Rüschlikon.

To further develop semiconductor technology, the field of molecular electronics is seeking to manufacture circuit components from individual molecules instead...

12.07.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Subaru Telescope helps pinpoint origin of ultra-high energy neutrino

16.07.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Barium ruthenate: A high-yield, easy-to-handle perovskite catalyst for the oxidation of sulfides

16.07.2018 | Life Sciences

New research calculates capacity of North American forests to sequester carbon

16.07.2018 | Earth Sciences

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