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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 255,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 255,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Temperature-controlled fiber-optic light source with liquid core

In a recent publication in the renowned journal Optica, scientists of Leibniz-Institute of Photonic Technology (Leibniz IPHT) in Jena showed that they can accurately control the optical properties of liquid-core fiber lasers and therefore their spectral band width by temperature and pressure tuning.

Already last year, the researchers provided experimental proof of a new dynamic of hybrid solitons– temporally and spectrally stationary light waves resulting...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Graphene assembled film shows higher thermal conductivity than graphite film

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, have developed a graphene assembled film that has over 60 percent higher thermal conductivity than graphite film - despite the fact that graphite simply consists of many layers of graphene. The graphene film shows great potential as a novel heat spreading material for form-factor driven electronics and other high power-driven systems.

Until now, scientists in the graphene research community have assumed that graphene assembled film cannot have higher thermal conductivity than graphite film....

22.06.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fast rising bedrock below West Antarctica reveals an extremely fluid Earth mantle

The bedrock below the West Antarctic ice sheet is rising much more rapidly than expected, revealing a very different Earth structure than previously believed. This discovery has important implications in understanding climate changes in Antarctica

An international team of researchers, with a new study published in Science with DTU Space as lead author, finds that the bedrock below the West Antarctic Ice...

22.06.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street View

Tiny freshwater fish have a view of the world that blows Google Street View out of the water - using different parts of their eyes to deliver optimum uses of colour, black-and-white and ultraviolet.

A zebrafish view of the world has been forensically analysed by researchers at the University of Sussex to reveal that how they see their surroundings changes...

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Beyond conventional solution-process for 2-D heterostructure

Solution-processed transitional metal chalcogenide (TMD) nanosheets exhibited limited light-absorption and low quantum efficiencies because of their atomic-scale thicknesses and large specific surface area accompanied with a high density of surface defects, which restricted their applications in optoelectronics.

Xiao Huang and co-workers, who were devoted to the development for the synthesis of 2D nanomaterial-based hybrids and their applications in sensing and...

22.06.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

New cellular pathway helps explain how inflammation leads to artery disease

Findings of Cedars-Sinai-led study suggest ways to improve therapies for heart attacks and stroke

Investigators have identified a new cellular pathway that may help explain how arterial inflammation develops into atherosclerosis--deposits of cholesterol,...

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

When fluid flows almost as fast as light -- with quantum rotation

Quark-gluon plasma is formed as a result of high energy collisions of heavy ions. After a collision, for a dozen or so yoctoseconds (that's 10-24 seconds!), this most perfect of all known fluids undergoes rapid hydrodynamic expansion with velocities close to the velocity of light. An international team of scientists, associated with the IFJ PAN and the GSI Centre, has presented a new model describing these extreme flows. Interestingly, for the first time effects resulting from the fact that the particles creating the plasma carry spin, that is, quantum rotation, are taken into account.

Each proton and each neutron is composed of several quarks bound by strong interactions carried by intermediary particles called gluons. When heavy ions built...

22.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater spurs fat cell development

Researchers saw increases in the size and number of fat cells in laboratory models following exposure, even at diluted concentrations.

Exposure to fracking chemicals and wastewater promotes fat cell development, or adipogenesis, in living cells in a laboratory, according to a new Duke...

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Finding the off-switch for side effects

Opioids are powerful painkillers that have a range of harmful side effects including addiction. Researchers from Germany, Austria and the USA have developed a tool that gives deeper insights into the brain’s response to opioids. Using mass spectrometry, they analyzed changes of proteins’ phosphorylation patterns in different regions of the brain and assigned them to the desired and the undesired effects of opioid treatment. Their results will lead the way for the identification of novel drug targets and the design of a new class of painkillers with fewer side effects. The study was published in the journal Science.

The signaling cascades that are used by cells to respond to external stimuli resemble the chain of command of a company. Activation of a receptor, which acts...

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Towards universal influenza vaccines – is Neuraminidase underrated?

Influenza vaccines contain the viral surface proteins hemagglutinin and neuraminidase. While up to now, the constantly changing hemagglutinin has been considered the main protective antigen, and thus influenza vaccines are adjusted for hemagglutinin content, the more strongly conserved neuraminidase has now aroused the interest of scientists. Researchers at the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut have shown that the potential of the neuraminidase to confer a broader protection against influenza strains of the same subtype is higher than previously thought. Journal of Virology reports on the results in its online version of 20 June 2018.

Influenza (the flu) is a serious infectious disease. Seasonal influenza epidemics cause 250,000 to 500,000 deaths world-wide each year, and the annual flu...

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Thermal Radiation from Tiny Particles

Researchers from Greifswald and Heidelberg have succeeded in performing time-resolved measurements of the internal energy distribution of stored clusters. The clusters investigated consisted of four cobalt atoms and an additional electron. Christian Breitenfeldt, a physicist at the University of Greifswald, presents, with his colleagues from the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, the direct observation of the radiative heat exchange of these nanoparticles with their environment in the journal Physical Review Letters.

You do not have to touch a hot stove to feel its heat. If it is hot enough, you can see it glow. But, even at lower temperature it still emits light – although...

22.06.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Polar ice may be softer than we thought

Tübingen and international researchers investigate ice flow speed in northern Greenland, correcting models predicting sea level change

Ice is a material that can flow like a very viscous liquid. In the polar ice sheets, it flows towards the oceans under its own weight. Knowing how fast the ice...

22.06.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Better model of water under extreme conditions could aid understanding of Earth's mantle

UChicago researchers use quantum simulations to more accurately predict water properties

Deep inside the Earth exist pockets of water, but the liquid there isn't like the water on the surface.

21.06.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

What are the effects of coral reef marine protected areas?

How can tropical coral reefs be protected effectively? An international team of 37 scientists from around the world studied nearly 1,800 coral reefs to determine the effectiveness of protective measures in areas with varying degrees of human influence. The study comprises data collected over a period of nine years and was published this week in the renowned journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

With his research on coral reefs off the Indonesian island of Sulawesi, reef ecologist Dr. Sebastian Ferse from the Leibniz Centre for Tropical Marine Research...

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

The Janus head of the South Asian monsoon

The world's largest weather phenomenon efficiently purifies the air of pollutants, but also distributes them across the globe

The same phenomenon recurs every year. During the dry season, in winter, burning fossil fuels and biomass in South Asia creates a huge pollution haze: the...

21.06.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

The world's tiniest first responders

'Walking molecules" haul away damaged DNA to the cell's emergency room

The cell has its own paramedic team and emergency room to aid and repair damaged DNA, a new USC Dornsife study reveals.

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

A new toxin in Cholera bacteria discovered by scientists in Umeå

Scientists affiliated with MIMS and UCMR describe their findings about a new toxin and its secretion mechanism from the major bacterial pathogen Vibrio cholerae in a recent publication in the journal Communications Biology (7 June 2018).

The bacterium Vibrio cholerae was discovered more than 150 years ago but remains as one of the main causes of bacterial infectious disease globally, especially...

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Using fragment-based approaches to discover new antibiotics

In the July 2018 issue of SLAS Discovery, a review article summarizes new methods of fragment-based lead discovery (FBLD) to identify new compounds as potential antibiotics.

Authors Bas Lamoree and Roderick E. Hubbard of the University of York (UK) explain how FBLD works and illustrate its advantages over conventional...

21.06.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

The secret of the soybean: Mainz researchers are investigating oil bodies in soybeans

Mainz researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) have used neutron scattering to study small oil bodies in soybeans. These serve the bean when budding and growing as an energy supplier. They are also used in the production of soybean oils. With their investigations, the scientists headed by Prof. Thomas Vilgis (MPI-P, Department of Prof. Kurt Kremer) studied the structure and thus the mechanical stability of these oil bodies. One possible application of their research results is the production of new and innovative foods on a natural basis.

Water and oil do not mix - this is an experience of everyday life. In order to mix water with oil, so-called "emulsifier agents" are needed. One of these is...

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Scientists print sensors on gummi candy: creating microelectrode arrays on soft materials

Microelectrodes can be used for direct measurement of electrical signals in the brain or heart. These applications require soft materials, however. With existing methods, attaching electrodes to such materials poses significant challenges. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now succeeded in printing electrodes directly onto several soft substrates.

Researchers from TUM and Forschungszentrum Jülich have successfully teamed up to perform inkjet printing onto a gummy bear. This might initially sound like...

21.06.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Proteins with different evolutionary histories now do the same job

University of Tübingen researchers discover convergent evolution in mitochondria in fungi and single-celled parasites

Mitochondria are essential organelles of cells with a nucleus – known as eukaryotic cells. These are the cells which make up fungi, plants, and animals...

21.06.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Creating a new composite fuel for new-generation fast reactors

Lobachevsky University scientists are also developing new materials for immobilizing radioactive waste

Joint research efforts of a team of scientists at Lobachevsky University of Nizhny Novgorod (UNN) comprising chemists, physicists and engineers are currently...

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Game-changing finding pushes 3D-printing to the molecular limit

The research, led by Dr Victor Sans Sangorrin from the Faculty of Engineering and Dr Graham Newton from the School of Chemistry, is published in the academic journal, Advanced Materials.

"This bottom-up approach to device fabrication will push the boundaries of additive manufacturing like never before. Using a unique integrated design approach,...

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Could this material enable autonomous vehicles to come to market sooner?

New material has optical properties that could enable better infrared detection for autonomous vehicles and assist firefighters

One of the leading challenges for autonomous vehicles is to ensure that they can detect and sense objects--even through dense fog. Compared to the current...

20.06.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Graphene assembled film shows higher thermal conductivity than graphite film

22.06.2018 | Materials Sciences

Fast rising bedrock below West Antarctica reveals an extremely fluid Earth mantle

22.06.2018 | Earth Sciences

Zebrafish's near 360 degree UV-vision knocks stripes off Google Street View

22.06.2018 | Life Sciences

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