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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 257,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 257,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Scientists present new observations to understand the phase transition in quantum chromodynamics

The building blocks of matter in our universe were formed in the first 10 microseconds of its existence, according to the currently accepted scientific picture. After the Big Bang about 13.7 billion years ago, matter consisted mainly of quarks and gluons, two types of elementary particles whose interactions are governed by quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the theory of strong interaction. In the early universe, these particles moved (nearly) freely in a quark-gluon plasma.

This is a joint press release of University Muenster and Heidelberg as well as the GSI Helmholtzzentrum für Schwerionenforschung in Darmstadt.

Then, in a phase transition, they combined and formed hadrons, among them the building blocks of atomic nuclei, protons and neutrons. In the current issue of...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
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Astrophysicists measure precise rotation pattern of sun-like stars for the first time

Equators of Sun-like stars rotate up to two and a half times as fast as higher latitudes, NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have discovered

Sun-like stars rotate up to two and a half times faster at the equator than at higher latitudes, a finding by researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi that challenges...

21.09.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Brought to light – chromobodies reveal changes in endogenous protein concentration in living cells

Scientists at the Natural and Medical Sciences Institute (NMI) in Reutlingen and the Eberhard Karls University of Tuebingen have developed new molecular probes to monitor and quantify changes in the concentration of endogenous proteins by live-cell fluorescence microscopy.

In a study now published in Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, Keller et al. describe how fluorescently labeled intrabodies (so-called chromobodies) are...

21.09.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fraunhofer ISE with over 60 Contributions at the European PV Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition

Photovoltaics is booming worldwide. If one considers PV installations in 2017, Europe has lost its pioneering role and now holds fourth place behind China, the USA and India. On the other hand, Europe is leading worldwide in PV research and development as demonstrated by the 35th European PV Solar Energy Conference and Exhibition EU PVSEC, held this year in Brussels from 24-28 September 2018. Fraunhofer ISE, Europe’s largest solar research institute, is represented at the conference with over 60 contributions in the form of talks, posters, session chairs and two plenary speeches as well as a booth at the exhibition.

The topics presented by Fraunhofer ISE at the conference cover the entire spectrum of the institute’s photovoltaic research. Silicon photovoltaics makes up the...

21.09.2018 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

558 million-year-old fat reveals earliest known animal

An international team of scientists has discovered molecules of fat in an ancient fossil to reveal the earliest confirmed animal in the geological record that lived on Earth 558 million years ago. The team was led by The Australian National University and included scientists from the German Max Planck Institute for Biogeochemistry and University of Bremen as well as the Russian Academy of Science. Their recent results are published in the journal Science.

The strange creature called Dickinsonia, which grew up to 1.4 metres in length and was oval shaped with rib-like segments running along its body, was part of...

21.09.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Neutrons produce first direct 3D maps of water during cell membrane fusion

Research could provide new insights into diseases in which normal cell fusion is disrupted

New 3D maps of water distribution during cellular membrane fusion are accelerating scientific understanding of cell development, which could lead to new...

21.09.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

To improve auto coatings, new tests do more than scratch the surface

Know that sickening feeling when you exit the grocery store and find your car has been banged up by a runaway shopping cart? It may one day be just a bad memory if auto body manufacturers make use of a new suite of tests developed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and three industry partners. Data from these tests could eventually help your vehicle's exterior better defend itself against dings, dents, scratches and things that go bump on the highway.

In a new paper in the journal Progress in Organic Coatings, researchers at four organizations--NIST and industry partners Eastman Chemical Co., the Hyundai...

21.09.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

A one-way street for salt

Barely heard of a couple of years ago, quinoa today is common on European supermarket shelves. The hardy plant thrives even in saline soils. Researchers from the University of Würzburg have now determined how the plant gets rid of the excess salt.

A growing world population means that more food is needed which in turn may require more land to grow food crops. More agriculture, however, results in...

21.09.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Nerve cells in the human brain can “count”

How do we know if we're looking at three apples or four? Researchers at the Universities of Bonn and Tübingen are now one step closer to answering this question. They were able to demonstrate that some brain cells fire mainly for quantities of three, others for quantities of four and others for other quantities. A similar effect can be observed for digits: In humans, the neurons activated in response to a “2” are for instance not the same as the neurons activated for a “5”. The results also demonstrate how we learn to handle number symbols in comparison to quantities. The study is published online in the journal “Neuron”.

We are born with the ability to count: Shortly after birth, babies can estimate the number of events and even perform simple calculations. But what exactly...

21.09.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

CT45 – A key to long-term survival in ovarian cancer

The diagnosis of ovarian cancer is still comparable to a death sentence. Only one in six patients survives more than 10 years after diagnosis. In a new study, an international research team from Germany, the USA, and Denmark, identified a molecular mechanism that is linked to patient long-term survival for those roughly 20% of the patients. By proteomic analysis, the protein CT45 was identified as a novel prognostic cancer cell marker. The authors further showed that the protein itself increases cancer cell death after platinum chemotherapy and activates the patient’s immune system. This work will be published in the renowned scientific journal Cell.

Ovarian Cancer

21.09.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Using viruses to fight resistant bacteria

Dr. Li Deng of Helmholtz Zentrum München has been awarded a Starting Grant of the European Research Council (ERC). The scientist intends to tackle antimicrobial resistance by fighting bacteria with their natural enemies – the viruses. The grant is endowed with nearly 1.5 million euros for five years.

Emergence of antimicrobial resistance is a major threat to global health. Worldwide, more than 700,000 people died due to impaired action of antibiotic agents,...

21.09.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Glacial engineering could limit sea-level rise, if we get our emissions under control

Targeted engineering projects to hold off glacier melting could slow down the collapse of ice sheets and limit sea-level rise, according to a new study published in the European Geosciences Union journal The Cryosphere. While an intervention similar in size to existing large civil engineering projects could only have a 30% chance of success, a larger project would have better odds of holding off ice-sheet collapse. But study authors Michael Wolovick and John Moore caution that reducing emissions still remains key to stopping climate change and its dramatic effects.

“Doing geoengineering means often considering the unthinkable,” says Moore, a scientist at Beijing Normal University, China, and a professor of climate change...

20.09.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Warning against hubris in CO2 removal

To be able to meet the temperature targets agreed upon in Paris, society needs to remove large quantities of CO2 from the atmosphere in future. However, the technologies required for this, frequently referred to as “negative emissions technologies” (NETs), come with certain risks. Their corresponding ethical implications should therefore be taken into consideration both in ethics and in climate science, recommend researchers led by Dominic Lenzi of the Mercator Research Institute on Global Commons and Climate Change (MCC).

They also warn of hubris in regard to the expansion of NETs, since the technologies’ large-scale applicability may be overestimated in the climate models. The...

20.09.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Halfway mark for NOEMA, the super-telescope under construction

The completion of NOEMA phase 1, the first phase of the NOEMA project was officially celebrated on Wednesday, September 19th. The Max Planck Society and its partner institute IRAM have completed the first, decisive step towards one of the most important German-French-Spanish initiatives in astronomy: upgrading the NOEMA observatory in the French Alps and developing the most powerful and most sensitive telescope at millimetre wavelengths in the Northern hemisphere. Four years after the inauguration of the first NOEMA antenna, ten 15-meter dishes currently constitute the observatory and have provided ground-breaking scientific results.

NOEMA (NOrthern Extended Millimeter Array) is part of a completely new generation of radio telescopes: it consists of an array of several movable telescopes...

20.09.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

One Step Ahead: Adaptive Radar Systems for Smart Driver Assistance

Constantly changing environments represent an enormous challenge for modern driver assistance systems. To meet these, software-controlled automotive radars offer entirely new opportunities: They are compact, low-cost, and also versatile and highly reconfigurable. By applying cognitive methods, they can be used to develop radars that intelligently and automatically adapt their parameters to the individual situations during operation. Fraunhofer FHR will present such an adaptive radar at the European Microwave Week at booth 33 in Madrid from 25 – 27.09.2018. The demonstrator accurately measures changing distances and positions quickly and intelligently while optimizing the use of resources.

Driver assistance systems have to ensure reliable operation in the whole range of different traffic conditions: In city traffic, for instance, they have to...

20.09.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

In depression the brain region for stress control is larger

Although depression is one of the leading psychiatric disorders in Germany, its cause remains unclear. A recent study at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences (MPI CBS) in Leipzig, Germany, and the Department of Psychiatry and Psychotherapy of the University Clinic in Leipzig found that those affected by depressive disorder have a larger hypothalamus compared to their healthy counterparts. This could explain why many sufferers show increased levels of the stress hormone cortisol and are very often afflicted with periods of tension.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) 322 million people worldwide were affected by depression in 2015—4.4 percent of the world’s population. In the...

20.09.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Narcolepsy, scientists unmask the culprit of an enigmatic disease

Patients with a rare disease, called narcolepsy, suffer of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy (brief episodes of loss of muscle tone triggered by emotions). A study published in the renowned scientific journal Nature reports, for the first time, the existence in patients with narcolepsy of autoreactive T lymphocytes (cells of the immune system) that recognize hypocretin and can mediate an immune response leading to loss of hypocretin-producing neurons. This study identifies the culprit of this enigmatic disease and has major implications for its diagnosis and therapy.

Patients with a rare disease, called narcolepsy, suffer of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy (brief episodes of loss of muscle tone triggered by...

20.09.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

What even Einstein didn't know

It provides the basis for solar energy and global communications: the photoelectric effect. Albert Einstein described it over a century ago. For the first time, scientists from the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Max-Planck Institute of Quantum Optics (MPQ), and the TU Wien have now measured the absolute duration of the light absorption and of the resulting photoelectron which is released from a solid body.

When a solid body is irradiated with X-rays, electrons separate from it and move towards the surface. But how long does this take? This question was...

20.09.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Making better use of enzymes: a new research project at Jacobs University

In biocatalysis, enzymes are used to accelerate chemical reactions. This plays a role in many areas, such as the production of beer, wine and cheese or the pharmaceutical industry. A research project at the English-medium Jacobs University led by Marcelo Fernandez-Lahore, Professor of Biochemical Engineering, aims to create a novel platform for facilitating the further processing of a wide range of biological products. “Our Nanofacil project will drastically simplify the application and implementation of biocatalytic processes in industrial practice,” says Fernandez-Lahore.

Enzymes enable important (industrial) chemical transformations under very mild conditions. Companies need fewer organic solvents and hazardous chemicals, and...

19.09.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Light provides spin

Physicists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have proven that incoming light causes the electrons in warm perovskites to rotate thus influencing the direction of the flow of electrical current. They have thus found the key to an important characteristic of these crystals, which could play an important role in the development of new solar cells.

Efficiency from spinning electrons

19.09.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Enjoying virtual-reality-entertainment without headache or motion sickness

Scientists from Fraunhofer FEP developped a large-area high-resolution low-power OLED microdisplay with high framerates. The use of these microdisplays in VR glasses can help to avoid motion sickness. The new displays can be seen at awe europe in Munich/ Germany from October 18 to 19, 2018 at booth no. 322.

VR glasses are increasingly popular. Not only are computer fans enthusiastic about them, virtual tours through museums or exhibitions are possible, and...

19.09.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Interfacial engineering core@shell nanoparticles for active and selective direct H2O2 generation

Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a versatile chemical in modern industry, widely applied in many different fields. To date, H2O2 is industrially manufactured by an indirect process that involves the sequential hydrogenation and oxidation of alkyl anthraquinone, which is however a multi-step process with high-cost and energy-intensive. On the sharp contrary, the direct synthesis of H2O2 from H2 and O2 is expected to be the most efficient way to produce H2O2 due to the remarkable advantages of atom economy, low energy consumption and only by-product of H2O.

Hitherto, the direct synthetic route is mainly achieved by the supported Pd-based catalysts. The major problem associated with that is related to the low...

19.09.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Is the Baltic Sea acidifying?

IOW researcher adapt optical pH measurement method for brackish waters

Great advancement for pH-monitoring in the Baltic Sea: For a better observation of possible acidification trends in brackish waters, Jens Müller, marine...

19.09.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Supported by software, Kaiserslautern architects assemble wooden dome like a puzzle

Wood is becoming increasingly popular as a sustainable building material. At the Technische Universität Kaiserslautern (TUK), the team led by Assistant Professor Dr Christopher Robeller has developed software that calculates how, for example, complex wooden building parts can best be assembled from individual parts, similar to a puzzle. A milling machine manufactures the parts according to these specifications. They only have to be assembled afterwards. What is special: Only wood is used, also connecting elements are made of natural material. This is how the researchers recently built a dome. Construction companies could use the technology by means of apps to build quickly and sustainably.

People have been using wood for constructing buildings material for thousands of years. While the material has tended to fall behind in recent years, demand...

19.09.2018 | Architecture and Construction | nachricht Read more

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"Boston calling": TU Berlin and the Weizenbaum Institute organize a conference in USA

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Latest News

Astrophysicists measure precise rotation pattern of sun-like stars for the first time

21.09.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Brought to light – chromobodies reveal changes in endogenous protein concentration in living cells

21.09.2018 | Life Sciences

"Boston calling": TU Berlin and the Weizenbaum Institute organize a conference in USA

21.09.2018 | Event News

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