Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Home

Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 266,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 266,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Anzeige

Im Focus: Biotechnology: Triggered by light, a novel way to switch on an enzyme

In living cells, enzymes drive biochemical metabolic processes enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very ability which allows them to be used as catalysts in biotechnology, for example to create chemical products such as pharmaceutics. Researchers now identified an enzyme that, when illuminated with blue light, becomes catalytically active and initiates a reaction that was previously unknown in enzymatics. The study was published in "Nature Communications".

Enzymes: they are the central drivers for biochemical metabolic processes in every living cell, enabling reactions to take place efficiently. It is this very...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Upwards with the “bubble shuttle”: How sea floor microbes get involved with methane reduction in the water column

For the first time, a research team from the Leibniz Institute for Baltic Sea Research Warnemünde (IOW) has been able to determine the efficiency with which methane-oxidising bacteria from the seafloor can travel with gas bubbles from submarine methane seeps into the open water column and influence biogeochemical processes there. This transport process can be of importance for the reduction of the greenhouse gas methane in the marine environment and thus for global climate developments.

Methane is one of the most potent greenhouse gases. How and where it reaches the atmosphere and which processes can prevent this, are therefore important...

27.05.2020 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Human skin is an important source of ammonia emissions

Human skin emits much more ammonia than the breath. The sticky molecule can spread on all surfaces and change the chemistry of our house.

In many regions of the world, people now spend over 90 percent of their life in indoor environments. In our homes and offices, we are exposed to many...

27.05.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Algorithms, gold and holographic references boost biomolecule diffraction

X-ray single particle imaging (SPI) is a technique where the very bright pulses produced by X-ray Free Electron Lasers are used to image single particles like biomolecules. Now research group leader Dr. Kartik Ayyer from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has conceived a new method to image much smaller biomolecules at a finer resolution than has been possible until now. His work has been published in Optica.

When a laser beam is ‘shot’ at a particle (a molecule or a crystal) during SPI, each object produces a diffraction pattern, which helps scientists to...

27.05.2020 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Diabetes mellitus: A risk factor for early colorectal cancer

Scientists have analyzed data of about 13 million people in order to determine the risk of colorectal cancer in diabetic patients. Researchers of the German Cancer Research Center DKFZ) and National Center for Tumor Diseases (NCT) in Heidelberg were able to show that diabetic patients are at increased risk of developing colorectal cancer, especially before age 50 years. Diabetic patients have a similar risk of developing colorectal cancer to people with a family history of colorectal cancer.

Scientists have analyzed data of about 13 million people in order to determine the risk of colorectal cancer in diabetic patients. Researchers of the German...

27.05.2020 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Ultra-thin fibres designed to protect nerves after brain surgery

The drug nimodipine could prevent nerve cells from dying after brain surgery. Pharmacists at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), in cooperation with neurosurgeons at University Hospital Halle (Saale) (UKH), have developed a new method that enables the drug to be administered directly in the brain with fewer side effects. Their findings were published in the “European Journal of Pharmaceutics and Biopharmaceutics”.

Brain surgery poses a major threat to nerve cells. Even slight injuries can kill the sensitive cells. The drug nimodipine could help prevent this. It is...

27.05.2020 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

High-resolution 3D view inside breast tumors with opto-acoustic mesoscopy

Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. But individual tumors can vary significantly, presenting different spatial patterns within their mass. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München have now succeeded in visualizing spatial changes within tumors by means of optoacoustics. This method may be helpful for the future development of new drugs.

Malignant tumors consume nutrients and oxygen faster than healthy cells. To do so, they recruit blood vessels in their environment. Depending on tumor type and...

27.05.2020 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

NIST researchers boost microwave signal stability a hundredfold

Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have used state-of-the-art atomic clocks, advanced light detectors, and a measurement tool called a frequency comb to boost the stability of microwave signals 100-fold. This marks a giant step toward better electronics to enable more accurate time dissemination, improved navigation, more reliable communications and higher-resolution imaging for radar and astronomy. Improving the microwave signal's consistency over a specific time period helps ensure reliable operation of a device or system.

The work transfers the already superb stability of the cutting-edge laboratory atomic clocks operating at optical frequencies to microwave frequencies, which...

26.05.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Complex genetic regulation of flowering time

Plant researchers from Kiel analyse the influence of genetic information on the onset of plant flowering using the example of thale cress

All flowering plants pass through a flowering period at the transition from the growth to the reproductive phase. Its beginning is determined by complex plant...

26.05.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

'One-way' electronic devices enter the mainstream

Columbia engineers first to build high-performance non-reciprocal devices on a compact chip, paving the way for applications from two-way wireless to quantum computing

Waves, whether they are light waves, sound waves, or any other kind, travel in the same manner in forward and reverse directions--this is known as the...

26.05.2020 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Bristol scientists see through glass frogs' translucent camouflage

Glass frogs are well known for their see-through skin but, until now, the reason for this curious feature has received no experimental attention.

A team of scientists from the University of Bristol, McMaster University, and Universidad de Las Américas Quito, sought to establish the ecological importance...

26.05.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Honeybees: pesticides disrupt nursing behaviour and larval development

Unique long-term videos show the bee nursery in the hive

A newly developed video technique has allowed scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt at the Bee Research Institute of the Polytechnical Society to record...

26.05.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Clear vision – project for safer laser treatment of floaters started

Vitreous opacities, so-called mouches volantes or floaters, disturb many people in their vision. Up to now, the treatment of this age-related change in the eye is often not recommended. In a new research project, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) wants to lay the foundation for a safer laser-based treatment method.

Conventional therapies for vitreous opacities in the eye are very risky and can make the situation of those affected even worse. An already existing treatment...

26.05.2020 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

New double-contrast technique picks up small tumors on MRI

Early detection of tumors is extremely important in treating cancer. A new technique developed by researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from normal tissue. The work is published May 25 in the journal Nature Nanotechnology.

researchers at the University of California, Davis offers a significant advance in using magnetic resonance imaging to pick out even very small tumors from...

26.05.2020 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Increased Usability and Precision in Vascular Imaging

Researchers at the University of Zurich have developed a new X-ray contrast agent. The contrast agent is easier to use and distributes into all blood vessels more reliably, increasing the precision of vascular imaging. This reduces the number of animals required in research experiments.

Various diseases in humans and animals – such as tumors, strokes or chronic kidney disease – damage the blood vessels. Capillaries, the smallest blood vessels...

26.05.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Sugar turns brown algae into good carbon sinks

Brown algae are important players in the global carbon cycle by fixing large amounts of carbon dioxide and thus extracting this greenhouse gas from the atmosphere. Moreover, because microbial decomposition of dead brown algae is slower than that of other marine plants, carbon dioxide fixed by brown algae remains much longer in the sea. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology, the MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen and other institutes therefore explored why brown algae degrade so slowly. They found that only highly specialized bacteria can carry out the degradation with the help of more than hundred enzymes.

You may like them or not, but almost everyone knows them: brown algae such as Fucus vesiculosus, commonly known as bladderwrack, grow along the entire German...

26.05.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Max Planck researchers develop the "ultimate cell sorter"

By combining imaging of deformed cells and artificial intelligence, researchers at the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Light and the Max-Planck-Zentrum für Physik und Medizin in Erlangen have succeeded in developing a high-speed method for identifying and sorting cells that does not require external cell labeling.

In medicine and biology, there is great interest in efficient and inexpensive methods for identifying and separating different cell types, for example for...

26.05.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New system for widespread availability of green hydrogen

Hydrogen researchers at Graz University of Technology, together with the Graz-based start-up Rouge H2 Engineering, have developed a cost-effective process for the decentralised production of high-purity hydrogen.

As an alternative propulsion technology in the transport sector, hydrogen is playing an important role in the energy transition. However, it is not yet...

26.05.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

An international team including scientists from MARUM discovered ongoing and future tropical diversity decline

How can patterns in the marine biodiversity of the past help us to understand how it may change in the future? A study published today by an international team including Prof. Michal Kucera and Dr. Kerstin Kretschmer from MARUM – Center for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen finds that the tropical diversity decline now seen in the ocean is not purely human induced, but nonetheless will worsen considerably if we do not limit anthropogenic climate warming.

The research, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), used fossils to reconstruct global oceanic biodiversity patterns for the...

26.05.2020 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Inexpensive retinal diagnostics via smartphone

Retinal damage due to diabetes is now considered the most common cause of blindness in working-age adults. In low- and middle-income countries, an eye examination via smartphone could help to detect changes at an early stage. This is shown by a new study carried out by scientists from the University of Bonn together with colleagues from Sankara Eye Hospital Bangalore (India). The results are published in the journal "Ophthalmology".

One of the most dangerous long-term complications of diabetes is vascular damage. In the eye's photosensitive layer, the retina, this also impacts the...

25.05.2020 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Smart machine maintenance: New AI system also detects unknown faults

A new maintenance system is helping to make sensors smart. A research team led by Professor Andreas Schütze of Saarland University is combining artificial intelligence with sensors that gather status data on industrial machinery. The system is able to detect damage, wear and error states, and, uniquely, is also able to recognize when previously unknown machine states arise, learning from them and assigning them to their underlying root causes. This approach offers small and medium-sized companies a means of automating their machine maintenance and servicing operations, allowing them to plan more precisely and avoid unpleasant surprises.

Vast numbers of sensors are constantly collecting data from today’s industrial machinery. And there’s a lot that can be learned from these huge data sets. When...

25.05.2020 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Artificial Intelligence for optimized mobile communication

While many European states are currently setting up the 5th generation of mobile communication, scientists are already working on its optimization. Although 5G is far superior to its predecessors, even the latest mobile communication standard still has room for improvement: Especially in urban areas, where a direct line of sight between emitter and transceiver is difficult, the radio link does not yet function reliably. Within the recently launched EU project “ARIADNE”, eleven European partners are researching how an advanced system architecture “beyond 5G” can be developed by using high frequency bands and artificial intelligence.

A major advantage of 5G is its high frequencies and consequently its high transmission rate, which ensures an almost latency-free connection and fast data...

25.05.2020 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

New technology can detect anti-virus antibody in 20 minutes

Researchers have succeeded in detecting anti-avian influenza virus antibody in blood serum within 20 minutes, using a portable analyzer they have developed to conduct rapid on-site bio tests. If a suitable reagent is developed, this technology could be used to detect antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, the causative virus of COVID-19.

Avian influenza is a poultry disease caused by influenza A virus infection. Rapid initial response for a suspected infection and continuous surveillance are...

25.05.2020 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

ATLAS telescope discovers first-of-its-kind asteroid

We often think of asteroids and comets as distinct types of small bodies, but astronomers have discovered an increasing number of "crossovers." These objects initially appear to be asteroids, and later develop activity, such as tails, that are typical of comets.

Now, the University of Hawai'i Asteroid Terrestrial-impact Last Alert System (ATLAS) has discovered the first known Jupiter Trojan asteroid to have sprouted a...

25.05.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

Aachen Machine Tool Colloquium AWK'21 will take place on June 10 and 11, 2021

07.04.2020 | Event News

International Coral Reef Symposium in Bremen Postponed by a Year

06.04.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Upwards with the “bubble shuttle”: How sea floor microbes get involved with methane reduction in the water column

27.05.2020 | Earth Sciences

Human skin is an important source of ammonia emissions

27.05.2020 | Life Sciences

Algorithms, gold and holographic references boost biomolecule diffraction

27.05.2020 | Information Technology

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>