Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Home

Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 257,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 257,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

Anzeige

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Controlling organ growth with light

EMBL researchers use optogenetics to drive structure changes in tissues

In optogenetics, researchers use light to control protein activity. This technique allows them to alter the shape of embryonic tissue and to inhibit the...

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease

Researchers have developed a new technique to analyse cell membrane proteins in situ which could revolutionise the way in which we study diseases, such as cancer, metabolic and heart diseases.

The discovery was made as part of an international research collaboration, led by Oxford University, alongside peers including Imperial College London. The...

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

How Humans and Machines Navigate Complex Situations

People intuitively find good solutions even in complex, unfamiliar situations. They learn quickly and are able to cope with an almost infinite number of options. A team of researchers have created a game to experimentally investigate how this is possible and found astonishing parallels to state-of-the-art machine algorithms. The results of the study have been published in Nature Human Behaviour.

Which career is right for me? Which pension scheme should I invest in? Which chess move should I make next? In many of the decisions we make, the number of...

19.11.2018 | Science Education | nachricht Read more

Finding plastic litter from afar

Researchers from Oldenburg support project Ocean Cleanup

Ghost nets and other plastic garbage drifting in the sea could soon be detected automatically by planes, drones or satellites. The basis for this has been laid...

19.11.2018 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

Channels for the Supply of Energy

Freiburg scientists elucidate the mechanism for the transport of water-insoluble protein molecules in mitochondria

Working in cooperation with international colleagues, researchers from the University of Freiburg have described how water-insoluble membrane proteins are...

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Vine Compound Starves Cancer Cells

Researchers from Würzburg and Toyama have discovered that a compound isolated from tropical rainforest vines inhibits the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in the lab.

Professor Gerhard Bringmann, an expert in natural product chemistry, and his team from the Institute of Organic Chemistry at the Julius-Maximilians-Universität...

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Why geckos can stick to walls

It enables geckos to adhere to walls and ceilings, is involved in the formation of membranes in cells as well as in the docking of drugs to enzymes in the human body. Dispersion, i.e. the "weak interaction", is omnipresent in chemistry. A team of scientists at Jacobs University Bremen headed by Dean and Chemistry Professor Dr. Werner Nau has now succeeded for the first time in experimentally quantifying the "London Dispersion", named after the German physicist Fritz London, in solution. The results of their fundamental research have now been published in the renowned journal "Nature Chemistry".

The scientific work on the project started more than three years ago and dates back to a priority program of the German Research Foundation (DFG) in which...

19.11.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Get rid of sweat at the push of a button

The Swiss sportswear manufacturer KJUS presented the world's first ski jacket with an integrated electronic user-controlled membrane on November 15. Thanks to the HYDRO_BOT technology developed together with Empa, the ski jacket actively pumps out sweat from inside the jacket to keep skiers dry and warm.

Efficient clothing is needed to keep the body warm and dry during winter sports. The demands placed on such textiles are high, as people sweat up to one liter...

19.11.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Zika virus vector vaccine protects the mother and the offspring in the mouse model

A vector vaccine against Zika virus based on the measles vaccine virus protects pregnant mice and their offspring against Zika virus infection and disease. At the same time this vaccine elicits an immune response against the measles virus comparable with that of the conventional measles vaccine. The Journal of Virology in its online version of 14 November 2018 reports on these research results of the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut (PEI) in co-operation with the Heinrich-Pette-Institute as well as The German Centre for Infection Research (Deutsches Zentrum für Infektionsforschung, DZIF) and the German Federal Ministry of Health who have funded the project.

Zika virus infections occur world-wide in more than 80 countries, in particular in the tropical and subtropical regions. From 2015 to 2017, the virus also...

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

Improved drug delivery method is aimed at making chemotherapy easier to help treat people with various tumors

Purdue University researchers have developed a technology aimed at making it easier to deliver cancer treatment to the right "address" in the body while also...

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Good preparation is half the digestion

The digestive system of our body is already activated before we take the first bite. Scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Metabolism Research in Cologne show how sensing food activates neurons in the brain which prime the liver for digestion.

In order to process ingested food efficiently, the body begins digestion as soon as it perceives the food. In the so-called cephalic phase, the production of...

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Microscope measures muscle weakness

Biotechnologists at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg (FAU) have developed a system to accurately measure muscle weakness caused by structural changes in muscle tissue. The new method allows muscle function to be assessed using imaging without the need for sophisticated biomechanical recordings, and could in future even make taking tissue samples for diagnosing myopathy superfluous.

The muscle is a highly ordered and hierarchically structured organ. This is reflected not only in the parallel bundling of muscle fibres, but also in the...

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

NASA keeps watch over space explosions

High above our heads, in near-Earth space, at times everything appears calm. But it's not always so. Sometimes the sparse particles and energy there provide a formidable show: a single mighty explosion, just a fraction of a second long, can lead to millions of electrons flying away at supersonic speeds.

Some fly out into space, while others are funneled along magnetic field lines into Earth's upper atmosphere where they create auroras, or wreak havoc on power...

16.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

How the gut ‘talks’ to brown fat

Gut hormone secretin can do more than previously believed

The long known gut hormone secretin has a newly discovered, additional function: It activates thermogenesis in brown fat, which triggers saturation.

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Massive impact crater from a kilometer-wide iron meteorite discovered in Greenland

The crater measures more than 31 km in diameter, corresponding to an area bigger than Paris, and placing it among the 25 largest impact craters on Earth

15.11.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

When electric fields make spins swirl

First example of ferroelectrically tunable skyrmions brings new hope for next-generation magnetic memory devices

We are reaching the limits of silicon capabilities in terms of data storage density and speed of memory devices. One of the potential next-generation data...

15.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Discovery of a cool super-Earth

Our stellar neighbourhood expands

Astronomers from the Observatory of the University of Hamburg were involved in the discovery of a new planet. As part of an international research team led by...

15.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Nanotubes built from protein crystals: Breakthrough in biomolecular engineering

Researchers at Tokyo Institute of Technology (Tokyo Tech) have succeeded in constructing protein nanotubes from tiny scaffolds made by cross-linking of engineered protein crystals. The achievement could accelerate the development of artificial enzymes, nano-sized carriers and delivery systems for a host of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

An innovative way for assembly of proteins into well-ordered nanotubes has been developed by a group led by Takafumi Ueno at Tokyo Tech's Department of...

15.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Gravitational waves from a merged hyper-massive neutron star

For the first time astronomers have detected gravitational waves from a merged, hyper-massive neutron star. The scientists, Maurice van Putten of Sejong University in South Korea, and Massimo della Valle of the Osservatorio Astronomico de Capodimonte in Italy, publish their results in Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society: Letters.

Gravitational waves were predicted by Albert Einstein in his General Theory of Relativity in 1915. The waves are disturbances in space time generated by...

15.11.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

A 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in newborns

A 15-minute scan could help diagnose brain damage in babies up to two years earlier than current methods.

In a study of over 200 babies at seven hospitals across the UK and the USA, researchers found the brain scan, called magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy,...

15.11.2018 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Putting food-safety detection in the hands of consumers

Simple, scalable wireless system uses the RFID tags on billions of products to sense contamination

MIT Media Lab researchers have developed a wireless system that leverages the cheap RFID tags already on hundreds of billions of products to sense potential...

15.11.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Insect Antibiotic Provides New Way to Eliminate Bacteria

An antibiotic called thanatin attacks the way the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria is built. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now found out that this happens through a previously unknown mechanism. Thanatin, produced naturally by the spined soldier bug, can therefore be used to develop new classes of antibiotics.

The global emergence of multi-drug resistant bacteria is posing a growing threat to human health and medicine. “Despite huge efforts from academic researchers...

15.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

New findings help to better calculate the oceans’ contribution to climate regulation

Carbon dioxide (CO2) is a major cause of global warming. Researchers use complex computer models to calculate the global circulation of this greenhouse gas. The oceans have a major influence on climate regulation. New research now helps to calculate this influence more precisely. These new findings are the result of a research project by scientists from Jacobs University and the Max Planck Institute for Marine Microbiology in Bremen in collaboration with colleagues from the Alfred Wegener Institute Helmholtz Center for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, the Marum Centre for Marine Environmental Sciences at the University of Bremen and the University of Gothenburg.

Oceans contain about 50 times more carbon than the atmosphere, and about 20 times more carbon than land. Algae and organic particles in the upper, sunlit water...

15.11.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Controlling organ growth with light

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences

New way to look at cell membranes could change the way we study disease

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>