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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 257,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 257,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: Goodbye, silicon? On the way to new electronic materials with metal-organic networks

Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz (Germany) together with scientists from Dresden, Leipzig, Sofia (Bulgaria) and Madrid (Spain) have now developed and characterized a novel, metal-organic material which displays electrical properties mimicking those of highly crystalline silicon. The material which can easily be fabricated at room temperature could serve as a replacement for expensive conventional inorganic materials used in optoelectronics.

Silicon, a so called semiconductor, is currently widely employed for the development of components such as solar cells, LEDs or computer chips. High purity...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

RUDN chemist tested a new nanocatalyst for obtaining hydrogen

A chemist from RUDN was the first to use catalysts with ruthenium nanoparticles to obtain hydrogen under the influence of visible light and UV radiation. In the future, such catalysts may be used for large-scale production of hydrogen fuel under the influence of sunlight. The results of the study were published in Applied Catalysis B: Environmental.

Photochemical reactions are one of the most eco-friendly ways of producing "green fuel". They don't consume a lot of energy for heating the raw materials or...

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Massive organism is crashing on our watch

First comprehensive assessment of Pando reveals critical threats

Utah State University researchers Paul Rogers and Darren McAvoy have conducted the first complete assessment of the Pando aspen clone and the results show...

18.10.2018 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Electrical enhancement: Engineers speed up electrons in semiconductors

Researchers from Graduate School of Bio-Applications and Systems Engineering at Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology (TUAT) have sped up the movement of electrons in organic semiconductor films by two to three orders of magnitude. The speedier electronics could lead to improved solar power and transistor use across the world, according to the scientists.

They published their results in the September issue of Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics, where the paper is featured on the cover.

Led by Kenji Ogino, a professor at Graduate School of Bio-Applications and Systems Engineering at TUAT, Japan, the team found that adding polystyrene, commonly...

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Dandelion seeds reveal newly discovered form of natural flight

Study explains why the plant is among the best fliers in the natural world

The extraordinary flying ability of dandelion seeds is possible thanks to a form of flight that has not been seen before in nature, research has revealed.

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Bursting the clouds for better communication

UNIGE researchers have developed a new technology that can bore a hole in the clouds to pave the way for laser-transmitted data from a satellite

We live in an age of long-range information, transmitted either by underground optical fibre or by radio frequency from satellites. But the throughput today is...

18.10.2018 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Outbreak of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis undetected by standard tests

On 26 September, the United Nations announced a plan to raise $13 billion annually for the fight to eradicate tuberculosis by 2030. With 10 million new cases and 1.6 million deaths in 2017, it is the most common infectious disease in the world, ahead of HIV.

In over 450,000 new cases of antibiotic-resistant tuberculosis that likely appeared, only 25% were detected. A study by an international research team*...

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Plants Emit Greenhouse Gas Nitrous Oxide at Substantial Amounts

Current study shows: Impact on natural climate processes greater than previously thought

Nitrous oxide, or N2O, is a greenhouse gas that affects the ozone layer and the earth‘s climate. Until now, experts believed that microbes in the soil were...

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

3D-printed lithium-ion batteries

Electric vehicles and most electronic devices, such as cell phones and laptop computers, are powered by lithium-ion batteries. Until now, manufacturers have had to design their devices around the size and shape of commercially available batteries. But researchers have developed a new method to 3D print lithium-ion batteries in virtually any shape. They report their results in ACS Applied Energy Materials.

Most lithium-ion batteries on the market come in cylindrical or rectangular shapes. Therefore, when a manufacturer is designing a product -- such as a cell...

18.10.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Carbon fiber can store energy in the body of a vehicle

A study led by Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, has shown that carbon fibres can work as battery electrodes, storing energy directly. This opens up new opportunities for structural batteries, where the carbon fibre becomes part of the energy system. The use of this type of multifunctional material can contribute to a significant weight-reduction in the aircraft and vehicles of the future - a key challenge for electrification.

Passenger aircraft need to be much lighter than they are today in order to be powered by electricity. A reduction in weight is also very important for vehicles...

18.10.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Test predicts outcome of hay fever therapies

Allergen-specific immunotherapy can make everyday life much more pleasant for allergy sufferers and provide long-term protection against asthma. It is unclear, however, what exactly happens during this treatment. A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Helmholtz Zentrum München investigated the processes taking place in the body over the course of a three-year allergen-specific immunotherapy. The researchers found clues as to why the allergy immunization takes so long and how the chances of success can be determined at a very early stage.

In allergen-specific immunotherapy – once known as hyposensitization – doctors inject patients with the substances that cause allergic reactions, mostly pollen...

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Biodiversity Can Also Destabilize Ecosystems

According to the prevailing opinion, species-rich ecosystems are more stable against environmental disruptions such as drought, hot spells or pesticides. The situation is not as simple as it seems, however, as ecologists at the University of Zurich and the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (Eawag) have now discovered. Under certain environmental conditions, increased biodiversity can also lead to an ecosystem becoming more unstable.

Ecosystems have a variety of benefits: They provide us with food, water and other resources, as well as recreational space. It is therefore even more important...

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Elucidating cuttlefish camouflage

Computational image analysis of behaving cuttlefish reveals principles of control and development of a biological invisibility cloak

The unique ability of cuttlefish, squid and octopuses to hide by imitating the colors and texture of their environment has fascinated natural scientists since...

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Robot-assisted sensor system for quality assurance of press-hardened components

In many industrial sectors, material defects in the final product can lead to premature failure and impair their safe use. Intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role in quality assurance: without damaging the material itself or changing the surface, components or parts can be inspected quickly and cost-effectively during the production process. From 23 to 26 October 2018, experts from Fraunhofer IZFP will present a robot-assisted sensor system providing quality monitoring as integral element of production processes at EuroBLECH in Hanover (hall 11, booth A25).

When time-consuming destructive testing methods are used, the damage or destruction of the products results in enormous costs of the quality inspection....

17.10.2018 | Trade Fair News | nachricht Read more

Sensory Perception Is Not a One-Way Street

Tübingen Neuroscientists decipher the pathways by which the brain alters its own perception of the outside world

When we interact with the world, such as when we reach out to touch an object, the brain actively changes incoming sensory signals based on anticipation. This...

17.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Plant Hormone Makes Space Farming a Possibility

With scarce nutrients and weak gravity, growing potatoes on the Moon or on other planets seems unimaginable. But the plant hormone strigolactone could make it possible, plant biologists from the University of Zurich have shown. The hormone supports the symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, thus encouraging plants’ growth – even under the challenging conditions found in space.

The idea has been bounced around for a while now – and not just by the likes of NASA, but also by private entrepreneurs such as Jeff Bezos and Elon Musk: that...

17.10.2018 | Agricultural and Forestry Science | nachricht Read more

Generating needs-led electricity with biogas plants

The share of renewable energy sources in electricity production is to be increased. However, the supply of wind and solar energy varies. Conversion of biogas into electricity offers an opportunity to compensate for such fluctuations through an adapted production. The prerequisite for this is that there is a sufficient and free storage capacity available in the systems at all times. The new BINE Projektinfo “Adjusting operation of biogas plants to power requirements” (07/2018) presents improved systems for filling level measurements and forecasts, and summarises recommendations for plant operation.

Optimal use of storage capacity

17.10.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Sex or food? Decision-making in single-cell organisms

Unicellular diatoms are able to adapt their behavior to different external stimuli based on an evaluation of their own needs. This was discovered by scientists of the Friedrich Schiller University and the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, together with partners from Belgium. The algae depend on nutrients in order to reproduce. They also need sexual mates which they find when they follow pheromone traces. In experiments, Seminavis robusta diatoms directed their orientation either towards nutrient sources or mating partners, depending on the degree of starvation and the need to mate. The tiny organisms demonstrated in fact a primitive form of behavioral biology.

Diatoms are unicellular microalgae. They dominate marine phytoplankton, which is ubiquitous in our oceans. On shores and beaches, these algae can be observed...

17.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Fungal weapon turns against the maker

An international research team led by Bernhard Hube from the Leibniz Institute for Natural Product Research and Infection Biology in Jena has solved another mystery of the yeast Candida albicans: They discovered that its fungal toxin Candidalysin boycotts its pathogenic effect by attracting immune cells. The scientists published their results in the journal Nature Communications.

Like many microorganisms, Candida albicans lives as a commensal, i.e. harmless beneficiary in the human digestive tract. It is part of a healthy microbiome....

17.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Unravelling the genetics of fungal fratricide

Selfish genes are genes that are passed on to the next generation but confer no advantage on the individual as a whole, and may sometimes be harmful. Researchers at Uppsala University have, for the first time, sequenced (or charted) two selfish genes in the fungus Neurospora intermedia that cause fungal spores to kill their siblings. Unexpectedly, the genes were not related to each other, perhaps indicating that selfish genes are more common than previously thought.

One mainstay of evolutionary theory is survival of the fittest individuals, whose genes can thereby be passed on. However, one type of gene - 'selfish' genes -...

16.10.2018 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Blue phosphorus -- mapped and measured for the first time

The element phosphorus can exist in various allotropes and changes its properties with each new form. So far, red, violet, white and black phosphorus have been known. While some phosphorus compounds are essential for life, white phosphorus is poisonous and inflammable and black phosphorus - on the contrary - particularly robust. Now, another allotrope has been identified: In 2014, a team from Michigan State University, USA, performed model calculations to predict that "blue phosphorus" should be also stable.

In this form, the phosphorus atoms arrange in a honeycomb structure similar to graphene, however, not completely flat but regularly "buckled".

16.10.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

High entropy alloys hold the key to studying dislocation avalanches in metals

Mechanical structures are only as sound as the materials from which they are made. For decades researchers have studied materials from these structures to see why and how they fail. Before catastrophic failure, there are individual cracks or dislocations that form, which are signals that a structure may be weakening. While researchers have studied individual dislocations in the past, a team from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the University of Tennessee, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory has made it possible to understand how dislocations organize and react at nanoscale.

"Metals are made of polycrystals and the crystals have atoms arranged in an orderly way," explained lead author Jian-Mu Zuo, Ivan Racheff Professor of...

16.10.2018 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Ultra-light gloves let users 'touch' virtual objects

Engineers and software developers around the world are seeking to create technology that lets users touch, grasp and manipulate virtual objects, while feeling like they are actually touching something in the real world.

Scientists at EPFL and ETH Zurich have just made a major step toward this goal with their new haptic glove, which is not only lightweight - under 8 grams per...

16.10.2018 | Power and Electrical Engineering | nachricht Read more

All in the family: Kin of gravitational wave source discovered

New observations suggest that kilonovae -- immense cosmic explosions that produce silver, gold and platinum--may be more common than thought

On October 16, 2017, an international group of astronomers and physicists excitedly reported the first simultaneous detection of light and gravitational waves...

16.10.2018 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

RUDN chemist tested a new nanocatalyst for obtaining hydrogen

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences

Massive organism is crashing on our watch

18.10.2018 | Earth Sciences

Electrical enhancement: Engineers speed up electrons in semiconductors

18.10.2018 | Life Sciences

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