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Latest research findings in innovations-report

innovations-report is an interdisciplinary forum for publishing research results and strengthening scientific collaboration.

The science, industry and economic forum functions as a knowledge network by shedding light on innovations resulting from scientific research. Modern research benefits from an active exchange between various disciplines to produce innovations inspired and driven forward through interdisciplinary communications. The forum's more than 8,200 global content partners publish up-to-date research findings from all scientific disciplines in more than 267,000 publications. By publishing scientific studies, informative statistics and trend-setting innovations, the forum acts as a catalyst for further research and networking.

Research results from all scientific disciplines

innovations-report purposely avoids focusing on specific fields of science. Up-to-dateinnovations across all scientific disciplines published by research-intensive companies as well as by well-known scientific institutes can be retrieved through innovations-report. The social sciences are represented, as well as all fields of the natural sciences such as astronomy and physics or life sciences. The forum also publishes innovative ideas from such fields asmedicine, information technology, ecology and many other disciplines. Given that global research requires an interdisciplinary network that is broad as possible, the international publication of periodically ground-breaking innovations is in the best interest of science.

Future-oriented companies are committed to research

Any company that wants to remain globally competitive requires independent research in its fields of expertise. The necessary inspiration can be provided by scanning innovations-report for research results from every corner of the world. Innovations created on the other side of the globe can serve to advance one's own ideas. This leads to continuously improved services, products and manufacturing processes adapted to changing global market conditions. Patents increase the value of a company and can have a significantly positive impact on revenues. The exchange of scientific knowledge takes place at the onset of each new innovation however.

Research and new innovations chart the course

Modern scienceis charting the course of the future, but not only for companies. Global research efforts regularly lead to new findings that impact people's current and future lives. State-of-the-art innovations can make day-to-day tasks increasingly simpler, ease the burden on our ecological system and promote human health. The most effective way to do this is through the interdisciplinary exchange of knowledge in all areas of research. Innovations must offer positive utility in order to benefit many people. When knowledge is made available to as broad an audience as possible and if it precisely outlines the advantages and disadvantages of a new innovation, researchers can then optimize how the results are used. p>

Scientific networking creates platform for sharing experiences

The sharing of research results has a long tradition, even prior to the digital age. Rapid advances in science can be traced in particular tointense, international collaboration in the area of innovations. Thanks to the Internet, new innovations can be divulged much faster to a broad base of interest groups these days. That means scientific developments are advancing faster than ever before. Research is not an end in itself, even though researchers can find a degree of personal satisfaction in their innovations. All innovations that derive from global research activities should be made available to the broadest range of interest groups to keep research from becoming a dead-end street. In many cases a new innovation can always be enhanced. Networking thus stimulates the development of the innovation and constantly pushes scientific research in new directions.

Welcome to innovations-report,

the cutting-edge research, industry and business platform that promotes dynamic innovation and networking.

With content from more than 8,200 partners and 267,000 publications, innovations-report offers up-to-date R&D results and information on leading-edge technologies, processes, products and services from innovative companies and well-known research institutes around the world, thus making us a key driver of global innovation.

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Im Focus: New Strategy Against Osteoporosis

An international research team has found a new approach that may be able to reduce bone loss in osteoporosis and maintain bone health.

Osteoporosis is the most common age-related bone disease which affects hundreds of millions of individuals worldwide. It is estimated that one in three women...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>
Latest News:

Manifestation of quantum distance in flat band materials

Landau level spectrum of singular flat bands enables to measure the distance between quantum states

The geometry of an object indicates its shape or the relationship of its parts to each other. Did you know that the electrons in solids also have geometric...

05.08.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease

Scientists at EPFL's Brain Mind Institute have identified an enzyme that can play a central role in developing a new route of treatment for Huntington's Disease.

Huntington disease is a progressive and aggressively debilitating brain disorder that causes uncontrolled movements, psychological problems, and loss of...

05.08.2020 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Rock debris protects glaciers from climate change more than previously known

A new study which provides a global estimate of rock cover on the Earth's glaciers has revealed that the expanse of rock debris on glaciers, a factor that has been ignored in models of glacier melt and sea level rise, could be significant.

A new study which provides a global estimate of rock cover on the Earth's glaciers has revealed that the expanse of rock debris on glaciers, a factor that has...

05.08.2020 | Earth Sciences | nachricht Read more

Study clarifies kinship of important plant group

Asterids comprise around 100,000 flowering plants, from heather to tomatoes. Up to now, their family relationships had not yet been fully clarified. A new study by the University of Bonn, Pennsylvania State University (USA) and Fudan University (China) has now somewhat closed this knowledge gap. It is the world's most detailed phylogenetic analysis ever conducted for asterids. The results of the study have been published in the journal Molecular Biology and Evolution.

Evolution is a process of gradual change. As a rule, organisms therefore differ from each other more markedly the longer it has been since their developmental...

05.08.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Human cell-based test systems for toxicity studies: Ready-to-use Toxicity Assay (hiPSC)

Since the beginning of 2020, the Fraunhofer Institute for Biomedical Engineering IBMT has been coordinating the "R2U-Tox-Assay: Ready-to-use Toxicity Screening Assay based on iPS-Technologies" project, which is funded by EIT Health. The aim of this project is to develop innovative toxicity assays for drug research based on human cell systems. This should enable better prediction of undesired side effects of drug candidates in preclinical phases and reduce animal experiments in pharmaceutical research.

Unfortunately, side effects of active substances are often part of everyday life in pharmaceutical studies. As a result, serious complications can arise in...

05.08.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Molecular Forces: The Surprising Stretching Behaviour of DNA

What happens when you pull a DNA molecule? It behaves quite differently than we are used to from macroscopic objects. Scientists at TU Wien were now able to explain this.

When large forces, for example in bridge construction, act on a heavy beam, the beam will be slightly deformed. Calculating the relationship between forces,...

05.08.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Carbon monoxide improves endurance performance

Carbon monoxide is a life-threatening gas - and yet it can have a performance-enhancing effect in small quantities. Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have come to this surprising insight thanks to a new study in the field of sports medicine. In healthy, well-trained individuals, the regular inhalation of carbon monoxide had the same effect as training at high-altitude. The online edition of the journal "Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise" has published first results of the study.

To increase their endurance, competitive athletes often train under oxygen-deficient conditions. This is traditionally conducted in select mountain regions,...

05.08.2020 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

How tumor cells evade the immune defense

Scientists are increasingly trying to use the body's own immune system to fight cancer. A new study by the University of Bonn and research institutions in Australia and Switzerland now shows the strategies tumor cells use to evade this attack. The method developed for this work contributes to a better understanding of the "arms race" between immune defense and disease. The results could help to improve modern therapeutic approaches. They have been published in the journal "Immunity".

Cancer cells differ from healthy body cells - in their appearance, their behavior and the genes that are active in them. Often this does not go unnoticed:

05.08.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

First radio detection of an extrasolar planetary system around a main-sequence star

An international team of astronomers including Gisela Ortiz-Leon (MPI for Radio Astronomy, Bonn, Germany) discovered a Saturn-like planet orbiting a small, cool star by detecting the "wobble" in the star’s motion caused by the gravitational pull of the planet. This is the first time that this technique is successfully employed with observations obtained at radio wavelengths. For their observations, the researchers used a network of radio antennas that are linked together to form a continent-size radio telescope. The discovery was possible thanks to the extremely high precision measurements of the star’s position that can only be achieved with such a radio telescope network.

Using the supersharp radio "vision" of the continent-wide Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), astronomers have discovered a Saturn-sized planet closely orbiting a...

04.08.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

The art of making tiny holes

How can you perforate an atomic layer of material and leave the one underneath intact? Scientists at TU Wien (Vienna) developed a technique for processing surfaces on an atomic scale.

Nobody can shoot a pistol bullet through a banana in such a way that the skin is perforated but the banana remains intact. However, on the level of individual...

04.08.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Early Mars was covered in ice sheets, not flowing rivers

A large number of the valley networks scarring Mars's surface were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought, according to new UBC research published today in Nature Geoscience. The findings effectively throw cold water on the dominant "warm and wet ancient Mars" hypothesis, which postulates that rivers, rainfall and oceans once existed on the red planet.

To reach this conclusion, lead author Anna Grau Galofre, former PhD student in the department of earth, ocean and atmospheric sciences, developed and used new...

04.08.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Diverse amyloid structures and dynamics revealed by high-speed atomic force microscopy

In the human body, proteins sometimes occur in fibrillar aggregates called amyloids. Although certain amyloids are known to have a biological function, amyloid formation is often associated with pathologies, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.

Understanding how exactly amyloid fibrils form is crucial for gaining insights into the development of such diseases and for advancing with treatment...

04.08.2020 | Health and Medicine | nachricht Read more

Novel magnetic stirrer speaks to lab equipment

A current problem for a wide range of chemists is when stirring a solution in the laboratory there is a need to check the properties of the solution and monitor how they change.

In the paper, 'Monitoring chemistry in situ with the Smart Stirrer --a magnetic stirrer bar with an integrated process monitoring system' published in the...

04.08.2020 | Physics and Astronomy | nachricht Read more

Identifying the blind spots of soil biodiversity

Soils harbour a substantial part of the world’s biodiversity, yet data on the patterns and processes taking place below ground does not represent all relevant ecosystems and taxa. For example, tropical and subtropical regions largely remain a blind spot when it comes to soil biodiversity. This is one of the results of a new study published in Nature Communications and led by scientists from the German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv), the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and Leipzig University (UL).

Soils contribute to many crucial ecosystem functions and services including climate regulation, nutrient cycling, and food production. To support their...

04.08.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Implantable transmitter provides wireless option for biomedical devices

Purdue University innovators are working on inventions to use micro-chip technology in implantable devices and other wearable products such as smart watches to improve biomedical devices, including those used to monitor people with glaucoma and heart disease.

The Purdue team developed a fully implantable radio-frequency transmitter chip for wireless sensor nodes and biomedical devices. The research is published in...

04.08.2020 | Medical Engineering | nachricht Read more

Surface clean-up technology won't solve ocean plastic problem

Clean-up devices that collect waste from the ocean surface won't solve the plastic pollution problem, a new study shows.

Researchers compared estimates of current and future plastic waste with the ability of floating clean-up devices to collect it - and found the impact of such...

04.08.2020 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation | nachricht Read more

AI & single-cell genomics

New software predicts cell fate

Traditional single-cell sequencing methods help to reveal insights about cellular differences and functions - but they do this with static snapshots only...

04.08.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Analyzing pros and cons of two composite manufacturing methods

Airplane wings, wind turbine blades, and other large parts are typically created using bulk polymerization in composite manufacturing facilities. They are heated and cured in enormous autoclaves and heated molds as big as the finished part. Frontal polymerization is a new out-of-autoclave method for composite manufacturing that doesn't require a large facility investment. Researchers at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign conducted a study pitting one process against the other to discover the pros and cons of each.

"Frontal polymerization doesn't use an autoclave at all, so it doesn't require that huge upfront investment," said Bliss Professor Philippe Geubelle in the...

04.08.2020 | Process Engineering | nachricht Read more

Machine learning methods provide new insights into organic-inorganic interfaces

Simulations at Graz University of Technology refute earlier theories on long-range charge transfer between organic and inorganic materials.

Oliver Hofmann and his research group at the Institute of Solid State Physics at TU Graz are working on the optimization of modern electronics. A key role in...

04.08.2020 | Materials Sciences | nachricht Read more

Deep learning on cell signaling networks establishes interpretable AI for single-cell biology

Researchers at CeMM, the Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, have developed knowledge-primed neural networks (KPNNs), a new method that combines the power of deep learning with the interpretability of biological network models. KPNNs learn multiple layers of protein signaling and gene regulation from single-cell RNA-seq data, thereby providing a much-needed boost in our ability to convert massive single-cell atlas data into biological insights. These findings have now been published in the renowned scientific journal Genome Biology.

Computer systems that emulate key aspects of human problem solving are commonly referred to as artificial intelligence (AI). This field has seen massive...

04.08.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

Novel approach improves graphene-based supercapacitors

Meeting growing demand for increased storage capacity

Demand for integrated energy storage devices is growing rapidly as people rely more and more on portable and wireless electronics, and the global need grows...

03.08.2020 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Germany-wide rainfall measurements by utilizing the mobile network

Rainfall maps with high temporal resolution derived from the attenuation of commercial microwave links (CMLs) by precipitation

Whether in flood early-warning systems or in agriculture - rainfall measurements are of great importance. However, there is a lack of accurate data for many...

03.08.2020 | Information Technology | nachricht Read more

Drug discovery: First rational strategy to find molecular glue degraders

Targeted protein degradation (TPD) represents a novel paradigm in drug discovery that could lead to more efficient medicines to treat diseases such as cancer. “Molecular glue degraders” are an emerging but understudied class of small molecules that have been shown to induce degradation of proteins commonly considered “undruggable”. Researchers at CeMM, the Research Center for Molecular Medicine of the Austrian Academy of Sciences, have described a strategy that, for the first time, enables the rational and highly scalable discovery of novel molecular glue degraders. Their findings have now been published in the renowned scientific journal Nature Chemical Biology.

Despite enormous efforts to advance traditional pharmacology approaches, more than three quarters of all human proteins remain beyond the reach of therapeutic...

03.08.2020 | Life Sciences | nachricht Read more

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Latest News

Manifestation of quantum distance in flat band materials

05.08.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

Discovery shows promise for treating Huntington's Disease

05.08.2020 | Health and Medicine

Rock debris protects glaciers from climate change more than previously known

05.08.2020 | Earth Sciences

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