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Photoionisation Lamps are the heart of gas detection systems

01.09.2011
  • Lamp specialist Heraeus Noblelight offers PID lamps with more than 8000 hours lifetime
  • The longest lifetime from the shortest lamp
  • Latest application note available

Heraeus Noblelight, one of the technology and market leaders in the field of specialty light sources, has published its latest application note on Photoionisation Detector Lamps (PID) lamps. PID lamps are at the heart of gas detection systems: why is a good PID lamp important and how to get the best out of it are explained in the latest application note. Lamp spectra, lifetime and the best practice for ensuring long term stability, plus why PID lamp quality is important are topics discussed.





Heraeus Photoionisation detector lamps (PID) measure volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and other gases in concentrations of ppm to ppb.

Copyright: Heraeus Noblelight GmbH, Hanau /Germany

PID lamps are most commonly used in Hand-Held Gas Detectors for VOC detection, gas chromatography (GC), trace gas monitoring and sample ionisation for mass spectrometry. “The purity of the spectrum is important for good lamp operation. The presence of secondary lines due to contaminants can affect the intensity of the primary lines, lamp intensity and lifetime”, explains Stephen Attwood, Sales Director of Heraeus Noblelight Analytics. However, contamination of the lamp can occur at higher wavelengths due in main to hydrocarbons. Whilst this does not interfere with the VUV lines in terms of detection of VOCs, the contamination absorbs some of the energy from those lines, resulting in decreased sensitivity and a shorter life time.

Heraeus PID lamps proved to last more than 8000 hours. The spectrum shows the difference between a Heraeus lamp and another lamp in the UV/visible range.

Reasons for long term spectral purity of Heraeus lamps are discussed in the high quality materials section. Please refer to the Heraeus website www.heraeus-noblelight.com or contact Heraeus for the complete application note: hna-analytics@heraeus.com.

Heraeus Noblelight, leading manufacturer of specialty light sources, is a global player in the industry. Deuterium and Hollow Cathode Lamps, PID and specialty lighting from Heraeus are not only engineered for long lifetime, but also for the highest precision and stability. Extensive testing of all light sources ensures they meet the specifications needed to give reliable and reproducible performance for the most demanding applications. Heraeus technology provides high quality and capability in modern analytical equipment, reducing Cost of Ownership and supporting the most sensitive analysis. Heraeus Noblelight develops and manufactures specialty light sources and power supplies for a wide range of analytical applications. Heraeus experts are available to support instrument manufacturers with customised designs for future developments.

Heraeus Noblelight GmbH with its headquarters in Hanau and with subsidiaries in the USA, Great Britain, France, China and Australia, is one of the technology and market leaders in the production of specialty light sources. In 2010, Heraeus Noblelight had an annual turnover of 98.9 Million € and employed 689 people worldwide. The organisation develops, manufactures and markets infrared and ultraviolet emitters for applications in industrial manufacture, environmental protection, medicine and cosmetics, research, development and analytical laboratories.

Heraeus, the precious metals and technology group headquartered in Hanau, Germany, is a global, private company with 160 years of tradition. Our fields of competence include precious metals, materials, and technologies, sensors, biomaterials, and medical products, as well as dental products, quartz glass, and specialty light sources. With product revenues of €4.1 billion and precious metal trading revenues of €17.9 billion, as well as more than 12,900 employees in over 120 subsidiaries worldwide, Heraeus holds a leading position in its global markets.

For further information please contact:
Heraeus Noblelight Analytics Ltd.
Nuffield Close
Cambridge CB4 1SS
Phone: +44 (1223) 424100
Fax: +44 (1223) 426338
E-Mail: hna-analytics@heraeus.com
Press contact
More information and images are available, please contact:
Daniela Hornung
Heraeus Noblelight GmbH
Heraeusstrasse 12-14
63450 Hanau, Germany
Phone: +49 (0) 61 81 / 35-3137
E-Mail: daniela.hornung@heraeus.com

Daniela Hornung | Heraeus Noblelight GmbH
Further information:
http://www.heraeus-noblelight.com

Further reports about: Analytic Heraeus Noblelight LAMP Noblelight PID Photoionisation VOC detector light source precious metals

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