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Transforming waste heat into electricity

15.11.2011
Steam expansion engine with ORC technology increases electricity yield

Much waste heat is generated in industrial production and power generation. It is estimated that a quarter of energy production in Germany is lost this way. Waste heat is currently often emitted into the atmosphere unused because there are no suitable technical procedures that allow it to be used efficiently.

In order to utilise these untapped energy resources and turn them into electricity, a technology company from Saarland, Germany, has combined a steam expansion engine with ORC technology. The BINE Projektinfo brochure “Transforming waste heat into electricity” (13/2011) introduces the system and some initial results from a field test.

ORC processes work like a conventional steam power plant. The only difference is that they use an organic working fluid, which evaporates at lower temperatures than water. This process allows the utilisation of heat at temperatures between 200 and 500 °C to produce electricity. Until now, the ORC process has usually been used in combination with turbines, which, however, has lower part-load efficiency. Combining it with a steam expansion engine proves to be more flexible. Here, it is possible to adapt it to different levels of temperature and pressure. Given the same level of heat, an ORC process together with the steam expansion engine can generate significantly more electricity than in combination with turbines. Any waste heat still remaining after the generation of electricity can then be used for heating purposes.

The new system is currently being tested in several branches as part of a field test and is expected to be ready for market in 2013. Around 500 industrial firms in Germany, especially in the areas of metal processing, glass production, the chemical and paper industry as well as around 1,000 larger CHP plants are potential areas of application.

Press contact
Uwe Milles
presse(at)bine.info
About BINE Information Service
Energy research for practical applications
The BINE Information Service reports on energy research topics, such as new materials, systems and components, as well as innovative concepts and methods. The knowledge gained is incorporated into the implementation of new technologies in practice, because first-rate information provides a basis for pioneering decisions, whether in the planning of energy-optimised buildings, increasing the efficiency of industrial processes, or integrating renewable energy sources into existing systems.

About FIZ Karlsruhe

FIZ Karlsruhe – Leibniz Institute for Information Infrastructure is a not-for-profit organization with the public mission to make sci-tech information from all over the world publicly available and to provide related services in order to support the national and international transfer of knowledge and the promotion of innovation.
Our business areas:
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FIZ Karlsruhe is a member of the Leibniz Association (WGL) which consists of 87 German research and infrastructure institutions.

Rüdiger Mack | idw
Further information:
http://www.bine.info/en

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