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Temex launches ultra-low phase noise RF oscillator

18.04.2007
Temex, a world leader in the design and manufacturing of time and frequency solutions, has announced the launch of a new, small RF oscillator in a 51.5mm x 51.5mm x 20.5mm package. This new ultra-low phase noise oscillator is designed for the instrumentation and radar markets.
“This oscillator meets the requirements expressed by various Ministries of Defence in Western countries for their new-generation radar systems that are capable of detecting stealth targets. Test benches should also include this type of very-high-performance oscillator,” says Jean Forget, Executive Manager of Temex’s Defence and Space division.

The new oscillator features several state-of-the-art technical characteristics. It has a frequency of 500MHz (with a possible frequency range of 300MHz to 600MHz), as well as lower phase noise at 10kHz from the carrier (165dBc/Hz). The phase-noise floor is 175dBc/Hz, with the frequency stabilised by temperature control and external control voltage. The unit’s dimensions are 51.5mm x 51.5mm x 20.5mm. The stability is 1ppm in the 0 – 50°C temperature range, with a target of -30°C to +70°C. Its aging is 1ppm / year and, once adjusted in the factory, the oscillator never requires any additional calibration.

The technological progress involved in the development of the oscillator is the product of Temex’s 15 years of experience in the design and manufacturing of extremely stable frequency sources, as well as the company’s unique know-how in the field of SAW resonators. The new ultra-low noise (ULN) sources meet the requirements of the instrumentation and radar markets.

Several prototypes that were sent to major players in the instrumentation and radar markets have achieved very satisfactory and even unexpected results. With the development of ultra-stable frequency sources at 500MHz, a reference for L band and X band sources, Temex is consolidating its development strategy in the fields of advanced high-performance oscillators.

Prototypes of this new 500MHz oscillator with a thermostat-controlled SAW resonator (OCVCSO: Oven Controlled Voltaged Controlled Saw Oscillator), under reference SR W150, will be available for system validations in the second quarter of 2007.

About Temex

Temex is a global, leading designer and manufacturer of total value-added time & frequency management solutions, and a growing supplier to major manufacturers and network operators. The company offers advanced high-performance products, from filter and oscillator components as well as frequency synthesizers to reference clocks, smart GPS timing modules, and test instruments. Temex also offers complete network-synchronisation systems that are used in a wide variety of applications industries.

Temex is headquartered in the heart of the high-technology park of Sophia-Antipolis near Nice (in south-east France). The specialist company also has offices in other European countries, in the USA and in Asia. With an annual turnover of €60 million, the company employs 750 staff across 10 countries.

Kate AMBLER | FTPB
Further information:
http://www.temex.com
http://www.ftpb.co.uk

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