Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Nanotech still holds huge untapped potential for the industry

17.04.2008
Finland is a forerunner in nanotechnology, and the fast-growing field has already produced strong results. The 70 million euro Tekes FinNano programme, currently in its third year, has launched companies and new business throughout the country. Applications of nanotechnology are in widespread use in the key areas of Finnish industry.

Finland's nanotech development has produced numerous success stories. For example, Nicanti technology helps combat product forgeries through marking genuine products with invisible codes; Nanocomp Ltd produces diffractive optics; and US-based specialty chemicals company OM Group has transformed an old foundry in Finland into a state-of-the-art product development center.

“The number of Finnish nanotechnology companies has grown rapidly over the last few years. Nanotechnology is applied throughout Finland's key industries, and the country has enjoyed notable success in commercialising its nanotech innovations,” said Mr. Markku Lämsä, Programme Manager, Tekes.

The most well-known Finnish company conducting research in nanotechnology is Nokia. The company cooperates with leading nanotech research universities. In February, Nokia unveiled the Morph concept that explores the use of stretchable and flexible materials in a mobile communications device.

“When looking at these success stories, we must remember that we have so far explored only a fraction of the possibilities of nanotechnology. The field still holds a wealth of untapped potential for the key areas of Finnish industry,” said Mr. Pekka Koponen, CEO, Spinverse Ltd.

Nanotechnology has been developed in Finland for over 30 years, and it is seen as the key technology of the current decade. The market for nanotech applications is expected to grow very fast in the next few years. For instance, Lux Research has estimated the value of nanotech-related goods and services at €1,800 billion in 2014.

The rapid growth of Finnish nanotechnology in recent years has been significantly supported by the Tekes FinNano programme, which strengthens Finnish nanotechnology research in selected focus areas and accelerates the commercial development of nanotechnology in Finland. The programme emphasises effective use of research results and promotes close collaboration between research and industry.

Since 2005, the number of Finnish nanotechnology companies has tripled from approximately 60 companies to between 150 and 200. The Tekes programme is carried out in close collaboration with the Academy of Finland's €9.5 million Nanoscience Research Programme. Worldwide investments in nanoscience research and development are estimated at €7,500 million for 2006.

Eeva Landowski | alfa
Further information:
http://www.nmpfinland.net
http://www.tekes.fi/finnano

More articles from Business and Finance:

nachricht Microtechnology industry is hiring – positive developments of past years continue
09.04.2018 | IVAM Fachverband für Mikrotechnik

nachricht RWI/ISL-Container Throughput Index with minor decline on a high overall level
20.03.2018 | RWI – Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung

All articles from Business and Finance >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Research finds new molecular structures in boron-based nanoclusters

13.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

Algae Have Land Genes

13.07.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>