Vasopressin caution in septic shock

The peptide hormone vasopressin is being developed as a new therapy for the hemodynamic support of septic shock and vasodilatory shock due to systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

Previously, the compound has been shown to increase blood pressure in septic shock that fails to respond to catecholamines. However, the safety of vasopressin treatment in humans with septic shock is yet to be proven. Now, researchers in Iceland, Switzerland, and the US, have tested the effects of vasopressin on pancreatic, renal, and hepatic perfusion in pigs and discovered that the compound causes severe disturbances in blood flow in these organs.

Dr Vladimir Krejci of the Department of Anesthesiology, Washington University School of Medicine, in St. Louis, Missouri, and colleagues investigated the effects of vasopressin on pigs divided into in four groups. Group S (sepsis) and group SV (sepsis/vasopressin) were exposed to fecal peritonitis, while Group C and Group V were non-septic controls. The team measured regional blood flow in the hepatic and renal arteries, the portal vein, and the celiac trunk by means of ultrasonic transit time flowmetry.

They found that in septic shock, vasopressin markedly decreased blood flow (by 58%) in the portal vein within an hour, and even after three hours the reduction stood at 45%. Flow was unchanged in the hepatic artery and increased in the celiac trunk, but was unchanged in the liver. Microcirculatory blood flow in the pancreas also fell considerably and, to a lesser extent, in the kidney. The investigation also revealed that increased urine output does not necessarily reflect increased renal blood flow and so may not be a useful indicator of the effects of a particular treatment.

Media Contact

Charlotte Webber alfa

More Information:

http://www.biomedcentral.com

All latest news from the category: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Back to home

Comments (0)

Write a comment

Newest articles

Perovskite solar cells soar to new heights

Metal halide perovskites have been under intense investigation over the last decade, due to the remarkable rise in their performance in optoelectronic devices such as solar cells or light-emitting diodes….

Blue hydrogen can help protect the climate

An international group of researchers led by the Paul Scherrer Institute and the Heriot-Watt University has carried out in-depth analyses of the climate impact of blue hydrogen. This is produced…

Genes associated with hearing loss visualised in new study

Researchers from Uppsala University have been able to document and visualise hearing loss-associated genes in the human inner ear, in a unique collaboration study between otosurgeons and geneticists. The findings…

Partners & Sponsors