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Eppendorf and DASGIP introduce the first single-use mini bioreactor for parallel bioprocessing

At this year’s Achema, held from June 18 – 22 in Frankfurt/Main, Eppendorf and the DASGIP Information and Process Technology GmbH, a leading manufacturer of Parallel Bioreactor Systems and comprehensive software solutions for bioprocessing, will show for the first time the new single-use mini bioreactor DASbox single-use vessel.

The development of the DASbox single-use vessel reinforces the strong synergy that benefits both DASGIP and the Eppendorf AG, which acquired the bioprocessing specialist this past January. “Within a very short time we were able to combine the long-standing competency of the Eppendorf AG in the field of plastics technology with our bioreactor expertise, which led to a new product”, explains Dr. Matthias Arnold, member of DASGIP management and head of the development department.

The DASbox single-use vessel is the first single-use bioreactor which was developed for the DASGIP Parallel Bioreactor Systems. As a fully instrumented mini bioreactor with a working volume of 60-250 ml, it was constructed specifically for use in combination with the DASGIP DASbox mini bioreactor system. Especially with cell culture users in mind, the advantages of singleuse technology are combined with the benefits of parallel cultivation and the full functionality of industrial bioreactors. All critical process parameters such as pH, soluble oxygen and optical density can be monitored and controlled using industry standard probes.

Integrated dip tubes allow for controlled addition of liquids, sampling, as well as fully massflow controlled gas supply. The magnet coupled stirrer is only one of the examples for the uncompromising sterile technology of this single-use bioreactor. A special feature of the DASbox single-use vessel is the novel, liquid-free Peltier element temperature control and condensation. This innovation, which enables, amongst others, efficient liquid condensation from the exhaust air, represents a further milestone in the transfer of the requirements of classic bioreactor technology to single-use technology.

The DASbox single-use vessel accelerates bioprocess development. The small working volumes save precious cell material and media, and extensive cleaning and sterilization procedures are superfluous. Less time is required for installation of the bioreactor, and cross contaminations are virtually excluded. Parallel cultivation under precisely controlled conditions delivers reliable results, fast. Further, the comprehensive software functions of DASGIP DASware allow user friendly and detailed capture, saving, analysis and management of resulting data.

We look forward to meeting you at the Achema at our booths:

Eppendorf hall 4.2. booth G7
DASGIP hall 4.2. booth L15
About Eppendorf:
Eppendorf is a leading life science company that develops and sells instruments, consumables, and services for liquid-, sample-, and cell handling in laboratories worldwide. Its product range includes pipettes and automated pipetting systems, dispensers, centrifuges, mixers, spectrometers, and DNA amplification equipment as well as ultra-low temperature freezers, fermentors, bioreactors, CO2 incubators, shakers, and cell manipulation systems. Associated consumables like pipette tips, test tubes, microtiter plates, and disposable bioreactors complement the instruments for highest quality workflow solutions. Eppendorf products are most broadly used in academic and commercial research laboratories, e.g., in companies from the pharmaceutical and biotechnological as well as the chemical and food industries. They are also aimed at clinical and environmental analysis laboratories, forensics, and at industrial laboratories performing process analysis, production, and quality assurance. Eppendorf was founded in Hamburg, Germany in 1945 and has about 2,600 employees worldwide. The company has subsidiaries in 23 countries and is represented in all other markets by distributors.
Additional information can be found at:
Contact: Dr. Oliver Franz, Phone: +49 40 53 801 801,
DASGIP DASGIP has been an industry-leading supplier of benchtop bioreactor solutions for the biotech, pharmaceutical and chemical industries as well as academia and research institutions, since 1991. Process engineers, scientists and product developers use DASGIP Parallel Bioreactor Systems and software solutions for the cultivation of microbial, plant, animal and human cells to benefit from increased productivity, high reproducibility, and ease of scale-up. A team of more than 70 in-house experts contribute to the ongoing success of the company with a compound 5 years annual growth rate of about 25%. DASGIP is headquartered in Juelich (Germany) and has operations throughout Europe, North America and Asia. In January 2012, DASGIP was acquired by Eppendorf AG, premium manufacturers of liquid, sample and cell handling products and expert partners in life science laboratories.
Additional information is available at:
Contact: Claudia M. Hüther-Franken, Phone: +49 2461 980 119,

Christiane Niehues-Pröbsting | DASGIP
Further information:

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