Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Novel therapeutic target identified to decrease triglycerides and increase 'good' cholesterol

Researchers provide insight on cardiovascular disease and metabolic syndrome prevention

Researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center today announce findings published in the October 20 issue of Nature that show for the first time the inhibition of both microRNA-33a and microRNA-33b (miR-33a/b) with chemically modified anti-miR oligonucleotides markedly suppress triglyceride levels and cause a sustained increase in high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) "good" cholesterol.

"The discovery of microRNAs in the last decade has opened new insights for up new avenues for the development of therapies targeted at these potent regulators of gene pathways," said lead author Kathryn Moore, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Medicine, The Leon H. Charney Division of Cardiology and The Marc and Ruti Bell Vascular Biology and Disease Program at NYU Langone Medical Center. "The current study is the first to show that inhibition of miR-33a, as well as miR-33b which is only found in larger mammals can suppress plasma triglyceride levels and increase circulating levels of HDL-C. This study highlights the benefits of modulating miR-33a/b and its downstream metabolic pathways for the treatment of conditions that increase cardiovascular disease risks, such as dyslipidemias and metabolic syndrome."

Metabolic syndrome is a combination of medical disorders that increase the risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Cholesterol is a growing public concern worldwide characterized by an increase in triglycerides, decrease in plasma HDL-C, obesity and resistance to insulin that can lead to both cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Recent studies have indicated miR-33a/b regulate genes involved in cholesterol and fatty acid metabolism pathways. miR-33a/b strongly represses the cholesterol transporter ABCA1, resulting in decreased generation of HDL-C and reverse cholesterol transport. In addition, miR-33a/b also inhibit key genes involved in fatty acid metabolism resulting in the accumulation of triglycerides. The ability to inhibit miR-33a/b to reverse these events provides a novel therapeutic approach to correct dyslipidemia and metabolic syndrome.

"This study represents a significant advance from our proof-of-concept studies in mice showing that anti-miR-33 can both raise HDL and improve existing atherosclerotic vascular disease," said Katey Rayner, PhD in the Department of Medicine at NYU Langone Medical Center and co-author of the study. "These exciting results now bring the use of miR-33 inhibitors one step closer to the clinic."

About NYU Langone Medical Center

NYU Langone Medical Center, a world-class, patient-centered, integrated, academic medical center, is one on the nation's premier centers for excellence in clinical care, biomedical research and medical education. Located in the heart of Manhattan, NYU Langone is composed of three hospitals – Tisch Hospital, its flagship acute care facility; the Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation Medicine, the world's first university-affiliated facility devoted entirely to rehabilitation medicine; and the Hospital for Joint Diseases, one of only five hospitals in the nation dedicated to orthopaedics and rheumatology – plus the NYU School of Medicine, which since 1841 has trained thousands of physicians and scientists who have helped to shape the course of medical history.

Christopher Rucas | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow
26.10.2016 | Duke University

nachricht Inflammation Triggers Unsustainable Immune Response to Chronic Viral Infection
24.10.2016 | Universität Basel

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

First results of NSTX-U research operations

26.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

UCI and NASA document accelerated glacier melting in West Antarctica

26.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

Ice shelf vibrations cause unusual waves in Antarctic atmosphere

25.10.2016 | Earth Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>