Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Methuselah’s Descendants – What Keeps Us Healthy in Old Age?

06.12.2011
The New Director of Population Health Sciences at the DZNE Investigates

Our life expectancy has increased considerably in recent centuries. However, which factors play a role in giving us longer mental and physical health? Professor Monique Breteler, new Director of Population Health Sciences at the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE), will undertake a large-scale study to answer this very question. Besides her affiliation with DZNE, Breteler is a professor of population health sciences at the University of Bonn.

“We are proud that Professor Breteler, one of the world’s leading scientists in the field of population studies, has joined the institute,” says Professor Pierluigi Nicotera, scientific director and chairman of the executive board of DZNE.

“We want to help people stay healthy. Our study aims to identify the determinants of good health,” explains Breteler. For this purpose, Breteler’s team will accompany both young people and seniors over an extended period in order to determine the differences in lifestyle, physical fitness or genetic predisposition that lead some people to keep their health and others to lose it. Although many diseases manifest only in old age, causes can be traced back to a much earlier phase of life. Especially in the case of neurodegenerative diseases, first alterations in the brain seem to occur much earlier than previously thought, long before symptoms appear.

“Our main objective is to investigate the causes of disease at a very early stage. This is the only way to prevent disease,” says Breteler. “We also hope to find ways to delay or prevent disease onset and to improve early diagnosis so that treatment can be initiated as early as possible. We still have no cure for neurodegenerative diseases.”

The study’s approach is unique. Professor Breteler focuses on prevention and early diagnosis of diseases in much earlier stages of life than previously studied. It is taking advantage of the newest methods and highly advanced technologies such as 3- and 7-Tesla magnetic resonance imaging, which is being used to a much greater extent than in previous studies. Also impressive is the study’s sheer scope. “We are depending on the support of about 30,000 volunteers aged 30 to 80 from the Rhineland, making a major contribution to an important societal challenge”, Monique Breteler explains.

In the scientific community Breteler is especially well known for her achievements in the Rotterdam Study, where she found a correlation between vascular diseases and neurological disorders of the brain. Since 1990, more than 15,000 volunteers have contributed to this result. “This finding has greatly influenced basic and clinical research,” notes Breteler. “It is particularly important to me that these areas of research, as well as population studies, all take place at DZNE under one roof, thus providing an ideal work environment.”

Monique Breteler studied both medicine and epidemiology. She received her MD in 1987 from the University of Nijmegen in the Netherlands and her Ph.D. in epidemiology in 1993 from the University Rotterdam. In 1995 she became head of Neuroepidemiology in the Department of Epidemiology at Erasmus Medical Center at the University of Rotterdam, and since 2002 she also holds an adjunct professorship at Harvard School of Public Health.

Contact:
Prof. Dr. Monique Breteler
Director for Population Health Sciences
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE)
Holbeinstr. 13-15
53175 Bonn
Tel: +49 (0) 228/43302-281
Email: monique.breteler(at)dzne.de
Sonja Jülich-Abbas
Spokesperson
German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases (DZNE)
Holbeinstr. 13-15
53175 Bonn
Tel: +49 (0) 228/43302-260
Email: sonja.juelich-abbas(at)dzne.de

Daniel Bayer | idw
Further information:
http://www.dzne.de

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Hunting pathogens at full force
22.03.2017 | Helmholtz-Zentrum für Infektionsforschung

nachricht A 155 carat diamond with 92 mm diameter
22.03.2017 | Universität Augsburg

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Pulverizing electronic waste is green, clean -- and cold

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

Astronomers hazard a ride in a 'drifting carousel' to understand pulsating stars

22.03.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

New gel-like coating beefs up the performance of lithium-sulfur batteries

22.03.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>