Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Handy corrosion sensors protect cultural and historical objects

29.05.2012
A safe companion: the AirCorr logger detects the corrosion risk of ambient air in real-time

Paris - Japan, a historical tapestry on its journey from the Louvre to an exhibition in Osaka: the AirCorr corrosion logger monitors the air quality surrounding the tapestry. The air humidity fluctuates minimally; the temperature is also fine. However, upon opening the transport box and exhibiting the tapestry in Osaka, the corrosivity increases tremendously.

The AirCorr corrosion logger registers the changes in real time. The data can be read via a wireless interface and transport procedures or the exhibition surroundings can be adjusted. Conventional sensor devices often measure only air humidity and temperature, and, therefore, would not have detected the increased air corrosivity, risking irrevocable damage to the cultural object.

A team of European researchers, museum experts and industry representatives developed the transportable and user-friendly real-time measuring device AirCorr in order to control the impact of corrosive atmospheres, especially on objects of importance to cultural heritage. The plug-in sensor units can be exchanged easily and, hence, can be used to monitor and protect various metallic objects. Important conclusions about the corrosiveness of the ambient air can also be drawn for non-metallic objects.

The loggers can be mounted almost everywhere since they are battery-driven and consume little power. Currently, the devices are being tested in several European museums and exhibitions. Furthermore, the user-friendliness of the logger software is being improved by including existing standards and recommendations, which allow the user to draw straightforward conclusions from the measured data.

The concept of the measuring device is simple and yet highly effective: the sensor is comprised of a thin metal layer (copper, silver, lead, iron, zinc, tin, bronze, or brass), which is deposited on an insulating substrate (made of ceramic or polymer). Corrosion of the metal layer causes an increase in its electrical resistance, which is recorded and can be used to calculate the degree of corrosion. A part of the sensor is protected against corrosion by an organic coating and serves as a reference to compensate
for the temperature-dependence of the electrical resistance.
The loggers and sensors have been developed and brought to commercial viability within the framework of the European research project »MUSECORR - Protection of cultural heritage by real-time corrosion monitoring« (FP7/2007-2013, project number 226539). Researchers from the Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP in Dresden used their vacuum-based precision coating technologies to develop a process for depositing thin metal layers in a precise and reproducible manner on the plug-in sensors for indoor use. Thicker metal layers for outdoor sensors were manufactured by the Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague. The cost-efficient AirCorr loggers are available with different resolutions designed for indoor or outdoor use can be purchased from the French Corrosion Institute, which is coordinating the project.
About the EU project »MUSECORR«
The European research project »MUSECORR - Protection of cultural heritage by real-time corrosion monitoring« (FP7/2007-2013, project number 226539) aims to develop handy corrosion sensors and loggers to monitor and protect historical and cultural heritage objects within a period of 3 years. The project coordinator is the French Corrosion Institute (»Institut de la Corrosion«) in Brest. Project partners include: the research institutes: Institute of Chemical Technology in Prague, Czech Republic, and the Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP in Dresden, Germany; the developer of the measuring technology: nke SA in Hennebont, France; and museum experts from the »Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musées de France« in Paris, the Swiss National Museum, and the National Museum of Denmark. The project ends in June 2012. Subsequent marketing of the product is planned by the French Corrosion Institute.
Scientific contact:
Tomas Prosek
Institut de la Corrosion, France
Phone +33 298 058 905
tomas.prosek@institut-corrosion.fr
Dr. Bert Scheffel
Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP
Phone +49 351 2586-243
bert.scheffel@fep.fraunhofer.de
Press contact:
Annett Arnold
Fraunhofer Institute for Electron Beam and Plasma Technology FEP
Phone +49 351 2586-452
annett.arnold@fep.fraunhofer.de

Annett Arnold | Fraunhofer-Institut
Further information:
http://www.musecorr.eu/
http://www.fep.fraunhofer.de/press

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Waste from paper and pulp industry supplies raw material for development of new redox flow batteries
12.10.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

nachricht Low-cost battery from waste graphite
11.10.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Neutron star merger directly observed for the first time

University of Maryland researchers contribute to historic detection of gravitational waves and light created by event

On August 17, 2017, at 12:41:04 UTC, scientists made the first direct observation of a merger between two neutron stars--the dense, collapsed cores that remain...

Im Focus: Breaking: the first light from two neutron stars merging

Seven new papers describe the first-ever detection of light from a gravitational wave source. The event, caused by two neutron stars colliding and merging together, was dubbed GW170817 because it sent ripples through space-time that reached Earth on 2017 August 17. Around the world, hundreds of excited astronomers mobilized quickly and were able to observe the event using numerous telescopes, providing a wealth of new data.

Previous detections of gravitational waves have all involved the merger of two black holes, a feat that won the 2017 Nobel Prize in Physics earlier this month....

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Ocean atmosphere rife with microbes

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

Neutrons observe vitamin B6-dependent enzyme activity useful for drug development

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

NASA finds newly formed tropical storm lan over open waters

17.10.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>