Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

From archaeology to zoology, enterprise education should be available to all students

11.12.2007
Enterprise education should no longer be confined to business schools, but must be taught to every student, whatever their discipline, if developed nations want to continue to compete effectively on the world stage.

This is the view of US academic Dr Anthony Warren, Director of the Farrell Centre for Corporate Innovation and Entrepreneurship at Smeal College of Business, Penn State University. Dr Warren will address a World Universities Network (WUN) conference on developing global entrepreneurs at the University of Leeds on 11 December on the subject of ‘Entrepreneurship - a Growth Industry: Where next?’ which will look at the field of entrepreneurship within a university context from a mainly US viewpoint.

Dr Warren says: “Increasing global competition and the rise of potential economic powerhouses like China and India are making Western nations sit up and realise that they have to be continuously innovative in order to keep their economies healthy. Regional and national governments are promoting entrepreneurship as a key economic driver in recognition of this.

“Innovation is one of the major topics being discussed in boardrooms around the US as we speak. It’s on every mission statement, every corporate advertisement. Big companies don’t necessarily know how to manage the entrepreneurial function but they know they need it and they will be looking for employees with the necessary skills to provide it.”

Those skills include self-confidence, creative problem-solving, leadership, good communication and, perhaps most importantly, the ability to deal with complexity and ambivalence. “Today’s world, with instant access to an excess of information via the Internet, demands such skills. Our educational systems should provide every student with a learning environment to develop the personal attributes of an entrepreneur, whatever they go on to do. An entrepreneurial mindset should be treated as a fundamental skill that can be applied at any enterprise scale, from start-ups to charitable institutions to global corporations.”

Dr Warren believes that the popular concept of an entrepreneur as someone who runs their own company, is an outdated one. “Entrepreneurship is a new way of thinking. The human race is facing new challenges - energy shortages, climate change, infectious diseases – and we need to encourage a different sort of thinker from a purely linear-thought graduate with a single skill. At Penn State we are looking at offering problem-based web courses in entrepreneurship to every student as part of their first-year general studies course, and currently even extend our outreach program to high schools in the area.”

The data shows that entrepreneurship and innovation are hot topics in US academia: the number of centres for innovation within academic institutions has increased from 50 to 250 in five years, with annual funding for some centres reaching US$3 million. The US, with its greater reliance on market forces, has often been seen as providing a more nurturing environment for entrepreneurs than Europe, with its strongly centralised social structures. Yet Dr Warren sees no reason why Europeans should not embrace the American trend, having taught his courses to enthusiastic students in Vienna and Bratislava earlier this year.

However, Dr Warren would like to see Europeans avoid the mistake of applying a ‘one size fits all’ model when it comes to designing university-driven regional economic development. He says: “Policy-makers erroneously assume that the model that worked successfully in innovation hubs like Boston, California’s Silicon Valley and Cambridge in the UK, would work everywhere, and this is just not so.

“Within Europe, the UK in particular is very regional, with places such as Leeds, Liverpool, Glasgow and Birmingham each having very different cultures, histories, social mores and industries. Any governmental efforts to make every region replicate the success of South East England will be a waste of money. Universities, with their standing in the communities and their extensive knowledge of their respective regions, can provide an invaluable service in the design of appropriate localised models.”

Jo Kelly | alfa
Further information:
http://www.leeds.ac.uk

More articles from Business and Finance:

nachricht Mathematical confirmation: Rewiring financial networks reduces systemic risk
22.06.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Frugal Innovations: when less is more
19.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Business and Finance >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A “cosmic snake” reveals the structure of remote galaxies

The formation of stars in distant galaxies is still largely unexplored. For the first time, astron-omers at the University of Geneva have now been able to closely observe a star system six billion light-years away. In doing so, they are confirming earlier simulations made by the University of Zurich. One special effect is made possible by the multiple reflections of images that run through the cosmos like a snake.

Today, astronomers have a pretty accurate idea of how stars were formed in the recent cosmic past. But do these laws also apply to older galaxies? For around a...

Im Focus: Visual intelligence is not the same as IQ

Just because someone is smart and well-motivated doesn't mean he or she can learn the visual skills needed to excel at tasks like matching fingerprints, interpreting medical X-rays, keeping track of aircraft on radar displays or forensic face matching.

That is the implication of a new study which shows for the first time that there is a broad range of differences in people's visual ability and that these...

Im Focus: Novel Nano-CT device creates high-resolution 3D-X-rays of tiny velvet worm legs

Computer Tomography (CT) is a standard procedure in hospitals, but so far, the technology has not been suitable for imaging extremely small objects. In PNAS, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) describes a Nano-CT device that creates three-dimensional x-ray images at resolutions up to 100 nanometers. The first test application: Together with colleagues from the University of Kassel and Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht the researchers analyzed the locomotory system of a velvet worm.

During a CT analysis, the object under investigation is x-rayed and a detector measures the respective amount of radiation absorbed from various angles....

Im Focus: Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories. Scientists may use this protocol in the future to build a data bus for quantum computers. The researchers have published their work in the journal Nature Communications.

Future quantum computers will be able to solve problems where conventional computers fail today. We are still far away from any large-scale implementation,...

Im Focus: Wrinkles give heat a jolt in pillared graphene

Rice University researchers test 3-D carbon nanostructures' thermal transport abilities

Pillared graphene would transfer heat better if the theoretical material had a few asymmetric junctions that caused wrinkles, according to Rice University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Ecology Across Borders: International conference brings together 1,500 ecologists

15.11.2017 | Event News

Road into laboratory: Users discuss biaxial fatigue-testing for car and truck wheel

15.11.2017 | Event News

#Berlin5GWeek: The right network for Industry 4.0

30.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

NASA detects solar flare pulses at Sun and Earth

17.11.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

NIST scientists discover how to switch liver cancer cell growth from 2-D to 3-D structures

17.11.2017 | Health and Medicine

The importance of biodiversity in forests could increase due to climate change

17.11.2017 | Studies and Analyses

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>