New cardiac defibrillator much safer for patients

Dr. Jeff Healey is seen implanting a subcutaneous defibrillator in a patient at the Electrophysiology Lab.
Credit: Owen Thomas, Hamilton Health Sciences

Fewer complications with device implanted under the skin.

High-risk patients who need defibrillators to prevent cardiac arrest can experience fewer complications with a type of device implanted under the skin, a Canadian study has found.

Traditional defibrillators, while highly effective, involve placing a wire through a vein, into the chest and into the heart itself.  The wires, known as ‘leads,’ in the traditional defibrillator – called a tranvenous ICD (TV-ICD) – can cause complications including perforations in the heart muscle or lungs and blood clotting in veins.

A study, conducted by researchers at Population Health Research Institute (PHRI) has demonstrated that a new type of cardiac defibrillator called a subcutaneous ICD (S-ICD) reduced patient complications by more than 90 percent, compared to the TV-ICD.

The S-ICD, implanted under the skin just below the patient’s armpit, does not involve any placement of leads into the heart or blood vessels. Instead, the S-ICD has a lead that runs under the skin, alongside the breastbone.

“The S-ICD greatly reduces perioperative, lead-related complications without significantly compromising ICD performance,” says Jeff Healey, a senior scientist at PHRI, a research institute of McMaster University and Hamilton Health Sciences (HHS).

“The S-ICD is now an attractive alternative to the TV-ICD, particularly in patients at increased risk for lead-related complications,” adds Healey, a professor of cardiology at McMaster, and an electrophysiologist at HHS.

Healey presented the study’s results at Heart Rhythm 2022 in San Francisco, CA today.

The study involved 544 eligible patients (one-quarter females) with average age of 49, at 14 clinical centres in Canada.

They were electrocardiographically screened; 251 patients were randomized to S-ICD and 252 patients to TV-ICD. They were followed up for an average of 2.5 years to this point; follow-up is ongoing for the study.

Younger patients are usually under-represented in ICD trials,” says Healey. “However, our study included ICD-eligible patients 18 to 60 years old who had a cardiogenetic syndrome or were at high risk for lead-related complications.”

He added: “Canada has a strong history of ICD clinical trials and registries of patients with inherited heart rhythm disorders.”

Funding for the study was provided by Boston Scientific.

Editors: Pictures of Dr. Jeff Healey in the electrophysiology lab at HHS; and his portrait picture, may be downloaded from: https://bit.ly/3uYZfgt

Fore more information, please contact:

Dr. Jeff Healey
jeff.healey@phri.ca
M: 905-330-6760

Veronica McGuire
Media Relations, Faculty of Health Sciences
McMaster University
vmcguir@mcmaster.ca
M: 289-776-6952

Heather Angus-Lee
Communications
Population Health Research Institute (PHRI)
heather.angus-lee@phri.ca
M: 905-308-0038

Wendy Stewart
Communications & Public Affairs
Hamilton Health Sciences
stewartwen@HHSC.CA

Method of Research: Randomized controlled/clinical trial
Subject of Research: People

Media Contact

Veronica McGuire
McMaster University
vmcguir@mcmaster.ca
Office: 905-525-9140 x22169

www.mcmaster.ca

Media Contact

Veronica McGuire
McMaster University

All latest news from the category: Medical Engineering

The development of medical equipment, products and technical procedures is characterized by high research and development costs in a variety of fields related to the study of human medicine.

innovations-report provides informative and stimulating reports and articles on topics ranging from imaging processes, cell and tissue techniques, optical techniques, implants, orthopedic aids, clinical and medical office equipment, dialysis systems and x-ray/radiation monitoring devices to endoscopy, ultrasound, surgical techniques, and dental materials.

Back to home

Comments (0)

Write a comment

Newest articles

Thermal insulation for quantum technologies

Thermal insulation is not only important for buildings, but also in quantum technologies. While insulation panels around a house keep the heat inside, quantum devices require insulation against heat from…

Spin keeps electrons in line in iron-based superconductor

Electronic nematicity, thought to be an ingredient in high temperature superconductivity, is primarily spin driven in FeSe finds a study in Nature Physics. Researchers from PSI’s Spectroscopy of Quantum Materials…

Scientists devise method to prevent deadly hospital infections without antibiotics

Novel surface treatment developed at UCLA stops microbes from adhering to medical devices like catheters and stents. A hospital or medical clinic might be the last place you’d expect to…

Partners & Sponsors