Scientists Spin Spidery Silk

Image:©Sean O’Neill

Few things appear as delicate as a spider’s web, each gossamer strand one-tenth the width of a human hair. Yet pound for pound, the sturdiest spider silks are stronger than steel and stretchier than nylon. With such remarkable properties, it’s no wonder that researchers have made numerous attempts to synthesize spider silk for industrial and medical applications. (Efforts to farm the arachnids have failed as a result of their territorial nature.) Indeed, in the words of one scientist, this goal has long stood as the “Holy Grail of material science.”

To that end, findings published today in the journal Science represent a big step toward making that dream an ironclad reality. According to the report, a team led by investigators at the Canadian company Nexia Biotechnologies has coaxed mammalian cells into producing spinnable proteins by equipping them with spider silk genes. After harvesting the proteins, the scientists spun them from a water-based solution into fine, silken threads. The synthetic strands possess the strength and toughness—although not quite the tenacity—of spider-made dragline silks, the ones the creatures use in their web frames and safety lines.

Looking forward, Nexia hopes to produce large quantities of the recombinant spider silk, trade-named BioSteelR, using goats engineered to produce the spider silk proteins in their milk. If successful, future applications of harvested silk could include medical sutures, high-strength composites and soft body armor.

Media Contact

Kate Wong Scientific American

All news from this category: Materials Sciences

Materials management deals with the research, development, manufacturing and processing of raw and industrial materials. Key aspects here are biological and medical issues, which play an increasingly important role in this field.

innovations-report offers in-depth articles related to the development and application of materials and the structure and properties of new materials.

Back to the Homepage

Comments (0)

Write comment

Latest posts

Exploring the evolution of stars

Fabian Schneider leads the new research group “Stellar Evolution Theory” (SET) at the Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies (HITS). The astrophysicist explores the turbulent life of massive binary stars and…

Sustainable insulating material for shipping temperature-sensitive products

Researchers at the Institute of Natural Products Engineering at TU Dresden have developed an insulating material made from recycled paper for shipping temperature-sensitive foods and medicines. As part of a…

Helium nuclei at the surface of heavy nuclei discovered

Research team confirms a new nuclear property predicted by theory Scientists are able to selectively knockout nucleons and preformed nuclear clusters from atomic nuclei using high-energy proton beams. In an…

Partners & Sponsors

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close