Novel Scaffolds for Tissue Engineering

Currently, an interdisciplinary research project is exploring new technologies with regard to biodegradable implants. The project is carried out by two research institutions at the Technische Universität Dresden, the Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials (MBC) at the Institute of Materials Sciences and the Institute of Textile and Clothing Technology (ITB), as well as the Leibniz Institute of Polymer Research in Dresden (IPF) and the University Hospitals in Ulm and Heidelberg.

The project’s aim is to create biologically resorbable scaffolds using flock technology. Flock technology for example is applied in an industrial scale to the production of the velvety surfaces of spectacle-cases. Now, this method shall help to produce new types of medical implants. In order to create resorbable scaffolds, membranes made of mineralised collagen are covered with a gelatine-based biocompatible glue. In the next step, biologically degradable fibres are flocked on the tapes. “This way a kind of ’velvet structure’ is created on which cells can be seeded with a high density”, explains Birgit Mrozik, scientific coworker at the ITB.

To make tissue engineered implants e.g. for cartilage defects, human chondrocytes are cultivated on the scaffolds in cell culture labs outside the body. Later on the whole cell matrix construct is implanted to fill the tissue defect. As the cartilage tissue regenerates, the flock implants then start to degrade.

At the beginning of the project, the research team examined which kind of fibres are possible to use. In medicine for example biologically resorbable fibres are applied to the stitching of internal injuries. Furthermore, the researchers analysed which kind of glue is suitable for the flocking process and for cultivating cells. In addition, possibilities to generate multilayered flock structures are currently being investigated.

Due to the material properties of the new flock scaffolds, the most promising area of application is seen in the field of cartilage, particularly of the spinal disc. Additionally, the new materials are tested for their biomechanical suitability in order to be applied within the spinal disc. The results gained from the interdisciplinary research project could also be helpful for further developments in regard to electrostatic flocking as well as to biotechnology (tissue engineering) and medical textiles.

Media Contact

Birgit Mrozik alfa

Further information:

http://www.tu-dresden.de

All news from this category: Materials Sciences

Materials management deals with the research, development, manufacturing and processing of raw and industrial materials. Key aspects here are biological and medical issues, which play an increasingly important role in this field.

innovations-report offers in-depth articles related to the development and application of materials and the structure and properties of new materials.

Back to the Homepage

Comments (0)

Write comment

Latest posts

Newly published data provides clearer picture of volcano collapse

URI Professor Stéphan Grilli is keeping a close eye on volcanoes closer to the US. An article recently published in the prestigious journal Nature Communications, written by University of Rhode…

World first concept for rechargeable cement-based batteries

Imagine an entire twenty storey concrete building which can store energy like a giant battery. Thanks to unique research from Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, such a vision could someday…

In milliseconds from polluted to clear water

New discoveries in the field of nanoscience … Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces developed a membrane that is composed of a bundle of nanometer-sized tubes….

Partners & Sponsors