Chronic Infection Now Clearly Tied to Immune-System Protein

Research up to now has tried but failed to decipher the cross-talk between 'killer T-cells' and 'helper T-cells' in the fight against viruses.

The new UAB study finds this cross-talk can only happen in the presence of interleukin-21, a powerful immune system protein. If interleukin-21 is missing for whatever reason, then the immune system's anti-viral efforts fail, said Allan Zajac, Ph.D., an associate professor in UAB's Department of Microbiology and lead author on the study.

The findings are published in the journal Science through its Science Express service.

“Adding interleukin-21 back in stimulates the immune response and controls the infection,” Zajac said. “We demonstrate that the loss of this protein prevents the control of the infection and diminishes the function of the killer T-cells, specifically CD8 T-cells.”

The study mice were treated for lymphocytic choriomeningitis, a viral infection of the membranes surrounding the brain and spinal cord. Measurements were taken for two types of T-cells, CD4 and CD8 T-cells, before and after the mice were treated with interleukin-21.

“Interleukin-21 served as the key messenger between the T-cells, whereas before we didn't know exactly how the two types of cells communicated with each other,” Zajac said. The CD4 T-cells help the immune system do its job by boosting CD8 T-cells' ability to fight and kill viruses.

Co-authors on the study include John Yi and Ming Du, Ph.D., both of UAB's Department of Microbiology. Research funds came from the National Institutes of Health.

About UAB

Known for its innovative and interdisciplinary approach to research, training and education, the UAB Department of Microbiology is a world leader in microbial genetics, pathogenesis, immunology and virology.

Media Contact

Troy Goodman EurekAlert!

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Life Sciences

Articles and reports from the Life Sciences area deal with applied and basic research into modern biology, chemistry and human medicine.

Valuable information can be found on a range of life sciences fields including bacteriology, biochemistry, bionics, bioinformatics, biophysics, biotechnology, genetics, geobotany, human biology, marine biology, microbiology, molecular biology, cellular biology, zoology, bioinorganic chemistry, microchemistry and environmental chemistry.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

Cyanobacteria: Small Candidates …

… as Great Hopes for Medicine and Biotechnology In the coming years, scientists at the Chair of Technical Biochemistry at TU Dresden will work on the genomic investigation of previously…

Do the twist: Making two-dimensional quantum materials using curved surfaces

Scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have discovered a way to control the growth of twisting, microscopic spirals of materials just one atom thick. The continuously twisting stacks of two-dimensional…

Big-hearted corvids

Social life as a driving factor of birds’ generosity. Ravens, crows, magpies and their relatives are known for their exceptional intelligence, which allows them to solve complex problems, use tools…

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close