Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Western images lead to changes in body shape in South Africa

15.04.2004


Black South African women are becoming thinner because of the influence of the West, including media-portrayed images of waif-like women in films and TV shows according to new research.

The findings come from a study between Northumbria University in the United Kingdom and the University of Zululand in rural South Africa. The study, which will be presented at the British Psychological Society conference in London today (Friday 16th April), revealed that young black women are becoming dissatisfied with their body image as a result of the social, cultural and political changes that have taken place in South Africa over recent years.

The research was a follow-up to an earlier study between the universities which revealed high levels of body dissatisfaction and disordered eating attitudes among black women in rural South Africa.



The women in the present study were asked about why they wanted to be thinner and about the factors they felt may be driving the trend for thinness in a culture which has historically favoured bigger women.

Julie Seed, Senior Lecturer in Psychology and an expert in eating disorders at Northumbria University, said: “The most common reason given was that they are following the Western ideal of ‘thinness equals beauty’ because they think that this is how men want them to look now. The common perception is that young black males prefer thin women, and because of this, the women feel they have no choice but to lose weight in order to appear attractive to the opposite sex.

“Secondly, they want to appear more modern and wear modern clothing which is only manufactured in smaller sizes. More traditional Zulu outfits are designed to fit all but there is the impression that in wearing these outfits they will appear old fashioned and “like my mother,” as one participant highlighted.

“Societal pressure is another factor. We discovered that friends, peers and even family members tease women if they are overweight. The images portrayed by the media were also highlighted, with a number of women explicitly stating that they wanted to look like the women on TV and in magazines.

“However, possibly the most intriguing factor which emerged was that of perceived empowerment. Women want to be thin because for the first time ever, they feel they can choose for themselves what size they want to be. For years, males had dictated their daughters’, wives’ and partners’ size. Weight was traditionally regarded as a symbol of prosperity and status in rural South Africa. Now, with the Westernisation of the country and the abolition of apartheid, women feel they are more empowered and they themselves have the power to choose their own size. This perception is rather at odds with their statements about wanting to be thin in order to attract men. If this is true, then it is still the males that are dictating female body shape and size – it’s just at a more covert level.”

Seventeen women from the University of Zululand, all aged around 21, took part in the study conducted by Miss Seed and colleagues Steve Olivier and Linda Allin together with Sabelo Nxumalo from Zululand University.

Andrea Trainer | alfa
Further information:
http://www.northumbria.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht High acceptance for smart products
21.02.2020 | Universität Luzern

nachricht Trash talk hurts, even when it comes from a robot
19.11.2019 | Carnegie Mellon University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: High-pressure scientists in Bayreuth discover promising material for information technology

Researchers at the University of Bayreuth have discovered an unusual material: When cooled down to two degrees Celsius, its crystal structure and electronic properties change abruptly and significantly. In this new state, the distances between iron atoms can be tailored with the help of light beams. This opens up intriguing possibilities for application in the field of information technology. The scientists have presented their discovery in the journal "Angewandte Chemie - International Edition". The new findings are the result of close cooperation with partnering facilities in Augsburg, Dresden, Hamburg, and Moscow.

The material is an unusual form of iron oxide with the formula Fe₅O₆. The researchers produced it at a pressure of 15 gigapascals in a high-pressure laboratory...

Im Focus: From China to the South Pole: Joining forces to solve the neutrino mass puzzle

Study by Mainz physicists indicates that the next generation of neutrino experiments may well find the answer to one of the most pressing issues in neutrino physics

Among the most exciting challenges in modern physics is the identification of the neutrino mass ordering. Physicists from the Cluster of Excellence PRISMA+ at...

Im Focus: Therapies without drugs

Fraunhofer researchers are investigating the potential of microimplants to stimulate nerve cells and treat chronic conditions like asthma, diabetes, or Parkinson’s disease. Find out what makes this form of treatment so appealing and which challenges the researchers still have to master.

A study by the Robert Koch Institute has found that one in four women will suffer from weak bladders at some point in their lives. Treatments of this condition...

Im Focus: A step towards controlling spin-dependent petahertz electronics by material defects

The operational speed of semiconductors in various electronic and optoelectronic devices is limited to several gigahertz (a billion oscillations per second). This constrains the upper limit of the operational speed of computing. Now researchers from the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter in Hamburg, Germany, and the Indian Institute of Technology in Bombay have explained how these processes can be sped up through the use of light waves and defected solid materials.

Light waves perform several hundred trillion oscillations per second. Hence, it is natural to envision employing light oscillations to drive the electronic...

Im Focus: Freiburg researcher investigate the origins of surface texture

Most natural and artificial surfaces are rough: metals and even glasses that appear smooth to the naked eye can look like jagged mountain ranges under the microscope. There is currently no uniform theory about the origin of this roughness despite it being observed on all scales, from the atomic to the tectonic. Scientists suspect that the rough surface is formed by irreversible plastic deformation that occurs in many processes of mechanical machining of components such as milling.

Prof. Dr. Lars Pastewka from the Simulation group at the Department of Microsystems Engineering at the University of Freiburg and his team have simulated such...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

70th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting: Around 70 Laureates set to meet with young scientists from approx. 100 countries

12.02.2020 | Event News

11th Advanced Battery Power Conference, March 24-25, 2020 in Münster/Germany

16.01.2020 | Event News

Laser Colloquium Hydrogen LKH2: fast and reliable fuel cell manufacturing

15.01.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

New molten metal hybrid filters from TU Freiberg will make components even safer and more resistant in the future

28.02.2020 | Materials Sciences

Polymers get caught up in love-hate chemistry of oil and water

28.02.2020 | Life Sciences

Two NE tree species can be used in new sustainable building material

28.02.2020 | Architecture and Construction

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>