Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Research to Match Tumours With the Most Effective Treatments

09.06.2005


Testing tumour cells to predict whether radiation or surgery would be the best form of treatment.



When treating people with cancer, time can be of the essence, and work is going ahead at the University of Leicester to learn how to predict which tumours can be treated more effectively by radiation therapy and which by surgery; this could save several weeks of inappropriate treatment and hopefully improve treatment outcome.

When you treat bladder cancers with radiation therapy, some will be cured and some will not. Radiotherapy can last for five weeks, and it is only after a period of 3-6 months when it is possible to know whether the treatment has worked.


Those people for whom radiation treatment has failed then have to undergo surgery, which in turn may be less effective because of the time that has passed since diagnosis and because the surgeon is now dealing with irradiated tissue.

If you could test tumour cells and predict accurately whether radiation or surgery would be the best form of treatment, then those who needed surgery could have it much sooner and the surgeon would be dealing with healthy tissue.

Dr Don Jones, who is leading this research in the University’s Biocentre, part of the Department of Cancer Studies and Molecular Medicine, is one of very few people in the UK working in this field.

His research team has identified a biological test called Comet Assay, which, through recording variation in the extent of DNA damage, formation and repair, seem able to predict those cells which are sensitive to radiation and those which are not. They are now working towards transforming the laboratory method for use in clinics, working with bladder tumours. Dr Jones commented:

“For about half of the patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer radiation therapy fails. These patients are disadvantaged as they are exposed to the additional risks associated with both radiation treatment and subsequent surgery, and may experience further disease progression before any secondary treatment is considered. Consequently, the appropriate choice of primary treatment is critical for the outcome of the patient.

“Unfortunately, there is currently no method of predicting outcome prior to radiation treatment. If radiation response could be predicted in advance, the appropriate treatment option could be identified at an earlier stage; radiation treatment could be promoted in patients with tumours expected to respond, whilst patients with non-responsive tumours could be identified and offered surgery at an earlier stage. In this way, hopefully, cure rates and hence survival could be improved and unnecessary treatment avoided.

“We are trying to investigate protocols we use in the lab as predictive tests. Comet Assay might not be the tool that actually goes into clinics. We need to see how we can translate our lab work into a clinical setting. We may need to find out how Comet Assay results occur first.”

Success will lead to the first clinical use of predictive test of tumour Radiotherapy response, and will increase understanding of tumour radiosensitivity.

The research has received funding from Cancer Research UK (CRUK) and involves researchers and clinicians based at the University of Leicester, the Leicester General Hospital and the University of Ulster.

Cancer Research UK relies almost entirely on public donations to fund its life-saving research, and its annual Race for life, supported by Tesco, will take place in Leicester this year on Sunday 10 July, at Western Park.

Leicestershire organisers are hoping to raise £235,000, topping last year’s figure of £226,849. Countrywide, Race for Life aims to raise £23M. The charity funds more than 3,000 scientists, doctors and nurses based throughout the UK. In 2003/2004, Cancer Research UK’s total science spend was around £213M.

Cancer Research UK’s 5 km Race for Life is a series of 162 fundraising walks or runs open to all women across the UK. To enter, log on to www.raceforlife.org or call the hotline on 08705 134 314.

Ather Mirza | alfa
Further information:
http://ebulletin.le.ac.uk/news/press-releases/2000-2009/2005/06/nparticle-nh7-tgm-39c

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Why might reading make myopic?
18.07.2018 | Universitätsklinikum Tübingen

nachricht Unique brain 'fingerprint' can predict drug effectiveness
11.07.2018 | McGill University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: First evidence on the source of extragalactic particles

For the first time ever, scientists have determined the cosmic origin of highest-energy neutrinos. A research group led by IceCube scientist Elisa Resconi, spokesperson of the Collaborative Research Center SFB1258 at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), provides an important piece of evidence that the particles detected by the IceCube neutrino telescope at the South Pole originate from a galaxy four billion light-years away from Earth.

To rule out other origins with certainty, the team led by neutrino physicist Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich and multi-wavelength...

Im Focus: Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.

Whirlpools are an everyday experience in a bath tub: When the water is drained a circular vortex is formed. Typically, such whirls are rather stable. Similar...

Im Focus: Breaking the bond: To take part or not?

Physicists working with Roland Wester at the University of Innsbruck have investigated if and how chemical reactions can be influenced by targeted vibrational excitation of the reactants. They were able to demonstrate that excitation with a laser beam does not affect the efficiency of a chemical exchange reaction and that the excited molecular group acts only as a spectator in the reaction.

A frequently used reaction in organic chemistry is nucleophilic substitution. It plays, for example, an important role in in the synthesis of new chemical...

Im Focus: New 2D Spectroscopy Methods

Optical spectroscopy allows investigating the energy structure and dynamic properties of complex quantum systems. Researchers from the University of Würzburg present two new approaches of coherent two-dimensional spectroscopy.

"Put an excitation into the system and observe how it evolves." According to physicist Professor Tobias Brixner, this is the credo of optical spectroscopy....

Im Focus: Chemical reactions in the light of ultrashort X-ray pulses from free-electron lasers

Ultra-short, high-intensity X-ray flashes open the door to the foundations of chemical reactions. Free-electron lasers generate these kinds of pulses, but there is a catch: the pulses vary in duration and energy. An international research team has now presented a solution: Using a ring of 16 detectors and a circularly polarized laser beam, they can determine both factors with attosecond accuracy.

Free-electron lasers (FELs) generate extremely short and intense X-ray flashes. Researchers can use these flashes to resolve structures with diameters on the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Leading experts in Diabetes, Metabolism and Biomedical Engineering discuss Precision Medicine

13.07.2018 | Event News

Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP: Fine Tuning for Surfaces

12.07.2018 | Event News

11th European Wood-based Panel Symposium 2018: Meeting point for the wood-based materials industry

03.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Machine-learning predicted a superhard and high-energy-density tungsten nitride

18.07.2018 | Materials Sciences

NYSCF researchers develop novel bioengineering technique for personalized bone grafts

18.07.2018 | Life Sciences

Why might reading make myopic?

18.07.2018 | Health and Medicine

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>