Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

GA Tech develops ultra-efficient embedded architectures based on probabilistic technology

13.03.2006


Probabilistic system on chip technology reduces energy consumption by a factor of more than 500 for some applications

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology announce energy savings by a factor of more than 500 in simulations with their ultra energy efficient embedded architecture based on Probabilistic CMOS (PCMOS). The research team’s PCMOS devices take advantage of noise, currently fabricated at the quarter-micron (0.25 micron) level, and uses probability to extract great energy savings. The findings will be presented at the Design, Automation and Test In Europe (DATE) Conference, the leading peer-reviewed European electronic systems design meeting, on March 9 in Munich, Germany.

The research team led by Dr. Krishna Palem, a joint professor in the Georgia Tech College of Computing and the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering and founding director of the Center for Research in Embedded Systems & Technology, has confirmed that architectural and application gains to be reported at DATE are as high as a factor of 560 when compared to comparable CMOS based architectures. As traditional CMOS semiconductor technology approaches the nanoscale, coping with noise and energy savings are increasingly important. PCMOS harnesses the inherent instability of noise and uses it as a resource to achieve energy efficient architectures. In the architectures, noise induces distortion in the application. However, given the human ability to average this routinely such as in voice when using cell phones, or in images when they are streamed to hand held devices, the user does not often notice the distortion as significant and is willing to pay the price for significant energy savings. A demonstration showing this effect in the context of video decompression used in modern DVD images is available for viewing at http://www.crest.gatech.edu/palempbitscurrent/demo.html



"Probabilistic architectures extend PCMOS to computing substrates beyond devices," says Palem. "By mixing chip measurements and simulations, gains have been shown using this technology for such applications as Hyper-encryption as applied to computer security, and through cognitive applications such as speech recognition and pattern recognition as well as image decompression. The gains ranged from a factor of 10 to a factor of more than 500 over conventional architectural approaches."

Beyond such architectural objectives, when applications need random sources, historically pseudo-random numbers generators were used. The Georgia Tech research team used the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) recommended tests to quantify and measure the quality of randomness of PCMOS within this limited context of being viewed as a source of random bits, beyond complete Probabilistic System on Chip (PSoC) architectures. PCMOS outperformed CMOS in the quality of random sequences generated.

Next Steps
The research team will work on developing PSoC architectures to be fabricated using devices of 180 nanometers, for specific applications with an embedded flavor such as video, and audio signal processing (DSP). Palem estimates this will take nine months to validate. The technical paper being presented at DATE is available at http://www.crest.gatech.edu/palempbitscurrent/date2006.pdf.

Elizabeth Campell | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.crest.gatech.edu/palempbitscurrent/date2006.pdf
http://www.crest.gatech.edu/palempbitscurrent/demo.html

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Studying how unconventional metals behave, with an eye on high-temperature superconductors
13.12.2018 | Princeton University

nachricht An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes
13.12.2018 | Rutgers University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

Im Focus: Topological material switched off and on for the first time

Key advance for future topological transistors

Over the last decade, there has been much excitement about the discovery, recognised by the Nobel Prize in Physics only two years ago, that there are two types...

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Magic number colloidal clusters

13.12.2018 | Life Sciences

UNLV study unlocks clues to how planets form

13.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Live from the ocean research vessel Atlantis

13.12.2018 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>