Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Development of MEMS sensor chip equipped with ultra-high quality diamond cantilevers

20.12.2018

Progress in the development of highly reliable and sensitive diamond MEMS sensors

A NIMS-led research group succeeded in developing a high-quality diamond cantilever with among the highest quality (Q) factor values at room temperature ever achieved.


Micrographs of the diamond MEMS chip developed through this research and one of the diamond cantilevers integrated into the chip

Credit: NIMS

The group also succeeded for the first time in the world in developing a single crystal diamond microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) sensor chip that can be actuated and sensed by electrical signals.

These achievements may popularize research on diamond MEMS with significantly higher sensitivity and greater reliability than existing silicon MEMS.

MEMS sensors--in which microscopic cantilevers (projecting beams fixed at only one end) and electronic circuits are integrated on a single substrate--have been used in gas sensors, mass analyzers and scanning microscope probes.

For MEMS sensors to be applied in a wider variety of fields, such as disaster prevention and medicine, their sensitivity and reliability need to be further increased.

The elastic constant and mechanical constant of diamond are among the highest of any material, making it promising for use in the development of highly reliable and sensitive MEMS sensors.

However, three-dimensional microfabrication of diamond is difficult due to its mechanical hardness. This research group developed a "smart cut" fabrication method which enabled microprocessing of diamond using ion beams and succeeded in fabricating a single crystal diamond cantilever in 2010.

However, the quality factor of the diamond cantilever was similar to that of existing silicon cantilevers because of the presence of surface defects.

The research group subsequently developed a new technique enabling atomic-scale etching of diamond surfaces. This etching technique allowed the group to remove defects on the bottom surface of the single crystal diamond cantilever fabricated using the smart cut method.

The resulting cantilever exhibited Q factor values--a parameter used to measure the sensitivity of a cantilever--greater than one million; among the world's highest. The group then formulated a novel MEMS device concept: simultaneous integration of a cantilever, an electronic circuit that oscillates the cantilever and an electronic circuit that senses the vibration of the cantilever.

Finally, the group developed a single crystal diamond MEMS chip that can be actuated by electrical signals and successfully demonstrated its operation for the first time in the world. The chip exhibited very high performance; it was highly sensitive and capable of operating at low voltages and at temperatures as high as 600°C.

These results may expedite research on fundamental technology vital to the practical application of diamond MEMS chips and the development of extremely sensitive, high-speed, compact and reliable sensors capable of distinguishing masses differing by as light as a single molecule.

###

This research project was carried out by Meiyong Liao (Principal Researcher, Research Center for Functional Materials [RCFM], NIMS), Haihua Wu (Trainee, RCFM, NIMS), Tokuyuki Teraji (Chief Researcher, RCFM, NIMS), Liwen Sang (Independent Scientist, International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, NIMS), Yasuo Koide (Director of the Research Network and Facility Services Division, NIMS) and Masaya Toda (Associate Professor, Tohoku University). This research was in part supported by the JSPS Grants-in-Aid for Scientific Research (B) (grant number: 15H03999) and the TIA collaborative research program "Kakehashi." This study was published in Physical Review Materials as an Editors' Suggestion article on September 28, 2018, local time, and in the online version of Advanced Materials Technologies on October 29, 2018, local time.

Contacts

(Regarding this research)

Meiyong Liao,
Principal Researcher,
Research Center for Functional Materials [RCFM],
National Institute for Materials Science
TEL: +81-29-860-4508
E-Mail: Meiyong.Liao@nims.go.jp

(For general inquiries)

Public Relations Office
National Institute for Materials Sciences
Tel: +81-29-859-2026
Fax: +81-29-859-2017
E-Mail: pressrelease@ml.nims.go.jp

Media Contact

Yasufumi Nakamichi
NAKAMICHI.Yasufumi@nims.go.jp
81-298-592-105

http://www.nims.go.jp/eng/index.html 

Yasufumi Nakamichi | EurekAlert!
Further information:
https://www.nims.go.jp/eng/news/press/2018/10/201810300.html
http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevMaterials.2.090601

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure
18.07.2019 | University of Warwick

nachricht New safer, inexpensive way to propel small satellites
16.07.2019 | Purdue University

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms

Adjusting the thermal conductivity of materials is one of the challenges nanoscience is currently facing. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and Spain, researchers from the University of Basel have shown that the atomic vibrations that determine heat generation in nanowires can be controlled through the arrangement of atoms alone. The scientists will publish the results shortly in the journal Nano Letters.

In the electronics and computer industry, components are becoming ever smaller and more powerful. However, there are problems with the heat generation. It is...

Im Focus: First-ever visualizations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure

Scientists have visualised the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely-tuned high performance electronic devices.

Physicists from the University of Warwick and the University of Washington have developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in...

Im Focus: Megakaryocytes act as „bouncers“ restraining cell migration in the bone marrow

Scientists at the University Würzburg and University Hospital of Würzburg found that megakaryocytes act as “bouncers” and thus modulate bone marrow niche properties and cell migration dynamics. The study was published in July in the Journal “Haematologica”.

Hematopoiesis is the process of forming blood cells, which occurs predominantly in the bone marrow. The bone marrow produces all types of blood cells: red...

Im Focus: Artificial neural network resolves puzzles from condensed matter physics: Which is the perfect quantum theory?

For some phenomena in quantum many-body physics several competing theories exist. But which of them describes a quantum phenomenon best? A team of researchers from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and Harvard University in the United States has now successfully deployed artificial neural networks for image analysis of quantum systems.

Is that a dog or a cat? Such a classification is a prime example of machine learning: artificial neural networks can be trained to analyze images by looking...

Im Focus: Extremely hard yet metallically conductive: Bayreuth researchers develop novel material with high-tech prospects

An international research group led by scientists from the University of Bayreuth has produced a previously unknown material: Rhenium nitride pernitride. Thanks to combining properties that were previously considered incompatible, it looks set to become highly attractive for technological applications. Indeed, it is a super-hard metallic conductor that can withstand extremely high pressures like a diamond. A process now developed in Bayreuth opens up the possibility of producing rhenium nitride pernitride and other technologically interesting materials in sufficiently large quantity for their properties characterisation. The new findings are presented in "Nature Communications".

The possibility of finding a compound that was metallically conductive, super-hard, and ultra-incompressible was long considered unlikely in science. It was...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on UV LED Technologies & Applications – ICULTA 2020 | Call for Abstracts

24.06.2019 | Event News

SEMANTiCS 2019 brings together industry leaders and data scientists in Karlsruhe

29.04.2019 | Event News

Revered mathematicians and computer scientists converge with 200 young researchers in Heidelberg!

17.04.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

Heat flow through single molecules detected

19.07.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Heat transport through single molecules

19.07.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Welcome Committee for Comets

19.07.2019 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>