Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

TV ads during sports depict unsafe behavior and violence

06.12.2004


Children watching commercials aired during televised sports events may frequently be exposed to violent and unsafe behavior, a study by a Penn State Children’s Hospital physician suggests.



"Our study found that nearly one in five commercials during televised major sporting events depict unsafe or violent behavior," said Robert F. Tamburro, M.D., associate professor of pediatrics, Penn State Children’s Hospital, Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center. "Studies report that children commonly watch televised sports, and thus, the commercial content of these programs should be scrutinized since data suggests that media exposure increases children’s risk-taking behavior."

The study titled, "Unsafe and Violent Behavior in Commercials Aired During Televised Major Sporting Events," appears in the December issue of the journal Pediatrics.


Previous studies have shown that violence is often depicted in commercials aired during Major League Baseball, but Tamburro’s study is the first to show that unsafe behaviors, such as riding a bicycle without a helmet, are depicted even more frequently.

The study team analyzed 1,185 commercials aired between Sept. 1, 2001, and Sept. 1, 2002, during the highest-rated televised sporting events. Sporting events included the Winter Olympics, National Football League playoff and regular season events, the National Basketball Association Western Conference Final Game, and the Major League Baseball World Series. The team reviewed only those commercials aired before 9 p.m., when children were more likely to be watching television.

Unsafe behavior was defined as any action that could have harmful consequences or that contradicted the injury prevention recommendations of national safety advocacy organizations. Violence was defined as any intentional physical contact by an aggressor that had the potential to include injury or harm, or the legitimate threat of such action.

Fourteen percent of the commercials depicted unsafe behavior and 6 percent depicted violence. Of the 322 commercial breaks reviewed in the study, 158, or 49 percent, contained at least one commercial that showed unsafe behavior or violence. Forty-eight percent of commercials that contained violence were for movies and an additional 38 percent were for television programs. Commercials for automobiles contained the highest number of depictions of unsafe behaviors.

"The Super Bowl had the highest proportion of commercials that contained unsafe or violent behaviors and the Masters Gold Tournament had no violent commercials at all and had only one commercial, which was aired three times, that included unsafe behavior," Tamburro said.

Some reports estimate that American children view 360,000 commercials before graduating from high school. Although rating systems are in place for television programs and movies to warn parents about adult content and violence, no such rating or preview systems are in place to warn parents about commercials. Moreover, it is plausible that parents might consider sporting events aired before 9 p.m. to be safe and free of such content.

"Our findings suggest that children’s exposure to televised sports should be limited and directly supervised by parents, as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics for television viewing in general," Tamburro said. "The movie and television industries should be encouraged to adopt models for commercial sponsorship of major sporting events that include little or no unsafe or violent content."

Valerie Gliem | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.psu.edu

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht New cruise ship “Mein Schiff 1” features Fraunhofer 3D sound on board
05.09.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

nachricht Small enclosure, big sound, clear speech
31.08.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Digitale Medientechnologie IDMT

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Researchers develop method to transfer entire 2D circuits to any smooth surface

What if a sensor sensing a thing could be part of the thing itself? Rice University engineers believe they have a two-dimensional solution to do just that.

Rice engineers led by materials scientists Pulickel Ajayan and Jun Lou have developed a method to make atom-flat sensors that seamlessly integrate with devices...

Im Focus: Three components on one chip

Scientists at the University of Stuttgart and the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) succeed in important further development on the way to quantum Computers.

Quantum computers one day should be able to solve certain computing problems much faster than a classical computer. One of the most promising approaches is...

Im Focus: Substitute for rare earth metal oxides

New Project SNAPSTER: Novel luminescent materials by encapsulating phosphorescent metal clusters with organic liquid crystals

Nowadays energy conversion in lighting and optoelectronic devices requires the use of rare earth oxides.

Im Focus: A bit of a stretch... material that thickens as it's pulled

Scientists have discovered the first synthetic material that becomes thicker - at the molecular level - as it is stretched.

Researchers led by Dr Devesh Mistry from the University of Leeds discovered a new non-porous material that has unique and inherent "auxetic" stretching...

Im Focus: The force of the vacuum

Scientists from the Theory Department of the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg have shown through theoretical calculations and computer simulations that the force between electrons and lattice distortions in an atomically thin two-dimensional superconductor can be controlled with virtual photons. This could aid the development of new superconductors for energy-saving devices and many other technical applications.

The vacuum is not empty. It may sound like magic to laypeople but it has occupied physicists since the birth of quantum mechanics.

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

Expert Panel on the Future of HPC in Engineering

03.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Small but ver­sat­ile; key play­ers in the mar­ine ni­tro­gen cycle can util­ize cy­anate and urea

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

New method gives microscope a boost in resolution

10.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Carnegie Mellon researchers probe hydrogen bonds using new technique

10.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>