Link established between presence of a key protein and the aggressiveness of prostate cancer

Prostate cancer is much more likely to be aggressive if a key protein called Stat5 is found activated and in abundance in the cancer cells, report researchers from Georgetown University’s Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. By inhibiting this protein, called Stat5, doctors are exploring how to develop a new treatment strategy for advanced prostate cancer.

The new findings, reported in the July 15th issue of the journal Cancer Research, show that active Stat5 protein is particularly plentiful in high histological grade human prostate cancer. High histological grade prostate cancers have often already metastasized by the time of diagnosis and are typically more aggressive in growth.

“Currently, there are only few treatment options available for advanced prostate cancer,” said Marja Nevalainen, MD, PhD, assistant professor of oncology at Georgetown University Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center. “If we can find a way to stop Stat5 from turning on in prostate cancer cells, we may be able to devise a new strategy for treating this disease.”

Previous studies by Nevalainen show that when the “telephone line” that sends signals to turn Stat5 on is blocked, human prostate cancer cells die. When the line remains open for communication, allowing Stat5 to send cellular signals, prostate cancer cells stay alive and thrive. Nevalainen’s work is focused on finding ways to short-circuit the signals that turn on Stat5, thus killing prostate cells before they flourish.

In this study, human prostate cancer specimens, which are routinely collected during prostate cancer surgeries for analysis of the histological grade of each prostate cancer, were analyzed for activation of Stat5. Activation of Stat5 was then correlated statistically with the histological grade of each specimen.

Nevalainen sees dual possibilities for where the future of Stat 5 research may one day lead: development of potential treatments and identifying whether Stat5 could serve as an effective sign for diagnosing cancer. “We are in the process of determining whether activation of Stat5 in prostate cancer would serve as an effective prognostic biomarker. Development of additional diagnostics, beyond the PSA test, may help physicians on the frontlines of cancer detection.”

Media Contact

Lindsey Spindle EurekAlert!

Weitere Informationen:

http://www.gumc.georgetown.edu

Alle Nachrichten aus der Kategorie: Health and Medicine

This subject area encompasses research and studies in the field of human medicine.

Among the wide-ranging list of topics covered here are anesthesiology, anatomy, surgery, human genetics, hygiene and environmental medicine, internal medicine, neurology, pharmacology, physiology, urology and dental medicine.

Zurück zur Startseite

Kommentare (0)

Schreib Kommentar

Neueste Beiträge

How Stable is the Antarctic Ice Sheet?

Scientists from Heidelberg University investigate which factors determine the stability of ice masses in East Antarctica. As temperatures rise due to climate change, the melting of polar ice sheets is…

Smart sensors for future fast charging batteries

European project “Spartacus” launched Faster charging, longer stability of performance not only for electric vehicles but also for smartphones and other battery powered products. What still sounds like science fiction…

Small molecules control bacterial resistance to antibiotics

Antibiotics have revolutionized medicine by providing effective treatments for infectious diseases such as cholera. But the pathogens that cause disease are increasingly developing resistance to the antibiotics that are most…

Partners

By continuing to use the site, you agree to the use of cookies. more information

The cookie settings on this website are set to "allow cookies" to give you the best browsing experience possible. If you continue to use this website without changing your cookie settings or you click "Accept" below then you are consenting to this.

Close