Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Reading speed harnessed to automatically control text display rates

03.03.2015

Reading a text is something that each of us does at our own individual pace. This simple fact has been exploited by computer scientists in Saarbrücken who have developed a software system that recognizes how fast a text on a display screen is being read and then allows the text to scroll forward line by line at the right speed. The technology makes use of commercially available eye-tracking glasses, which are able to capture the motion of the user’s eyes and convert this into a reading speed. Potential future areas of applications include electronic books or the large-scale displays used in railway stations and shopping centres.

The research team will be showcasing its project from March 16th to March 20th at the Cebit computer expo in Hanover (Stand E13, Hall 9).


Computer scientists in Saarbrücken have developed a software system that recognizes how fast a text is being read and then allows the text to scroll forward line by line at the right speed.

Credits: Oliver Dietze

Average readers manage about 200 words per minute. Once they reach the end of a page in a book, they turn the page. Things are somewhat different when reading a text on a display. In this case, the reader might use the mouse to pull up the next section of text to be read. This is something the team of computer scientists from Saarland University and the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI) would like to change.

Their solution is based on the movement of the reader’s eyes. The system analyses the reading speed and uses the result to automatically adjust the speed at which the text is displayed on the screen. ‘We use commercially available eye-tracking glasses,’ explains Christian Lander, a doctoral research student who works at the DFKI’s Innovative Retail Laboratory and is supervised by Professor Antonio Krüger.

The glasses are equipped with two cameras: a small infrared camera that faces the user and tracks the movement of the pupil in the user’s right eye. The other camera faces forward and records the image that the user is looking at. The software combines the images from the two cameras and is thus able to precisely determine the direction of eye gaze.

‘We have combined the image capture technology with a computational procedure that we developed in the media informatics research seminar,’ says Lander. ‘It computes the average speed at which a paragraph is read. The method involves registering how quickly the reader’s eye travels from left to right along a line of text and then downward to the next line.’ The system recognizes any change in the reader’s reading speed and adjusts the text scrolling speed accordingly.

The system currently allows three readers to simultaneously read the same text on a single display. ‘Each reader has their own small window in which they can read the text at their preferred speed,’ explains Lander. It is conceivable that in a few years’ time this technology will be used on the sorts of large displays found in railway stations or shopping centres.

At the moment, tracking glasses are needed in order to register the wearer’s gaze. However, the system could be installed in future in other more user-friendly wearable devices such as Google Glass. The method can also be adapted for use on smaller displays or with electronic books.

Computer science and informatics at Saarland University

The Department of Computer Science forms the core of the informatics landscape at Saarland University. A further seven internationally renowned research institutes are located in the immediate vicinity on campus. As well as the two Max Planck Institutes for Informatics and for Software Systems, the Saarbrücken campus is also home to the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence, the Intel Visual Computing Institute, the Center for IT-Security, Privacy and Accountability (CISPA) and the Cluster of Excellence ‘Multimodal Computing and Interaction’.

Christian Lander is one of 370 doctoral research students currently studying at the Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science.

Questions can be addressed to:
Christian Lander
Innovative Retail Laboratory (IRL) / DFKI
E-mail: christian.lander(at)dfki.de
Tel.: +49 (0)681 85775-5009

Editor:
Gordon Bolduan
Science Communication
KIS – Computer Science Competence Center Saarland
Tel: +49 (0)681 302-70741
E-mail: bolduan(at)mmci.uni-saarland.de

Note for radio journalists: Studio-quality telephone interviews can be conducted with researchers at Saarland University using broadcast audio IP codec technology (IP direct dial or via the ARD node 106813020001). Interview requests should be addressed to the university’s Press and Public Relations Office (+49 (0)681 302-2601).

Melanie Löw | Universität des Saarlandes
Further information:
http://www.uni-saarland.de

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight
24.04.2018 | Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und -prüfung (BAM)

nachricht Clean and Efficient – Fraunhofer ISE Presents Hydrogen Technologies at the HANNOVER MESSE 2018
23.04.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Solare Energiesysteme ISE

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

At the Hannover Messe 2018, the Bundesanstalt für Materialforschung und-prüfung (BAM) will show how, in the future, astronauts could produce their own tools or spare parts in zero gravity using 3D printing. This will reduce, weight and transport costs for space missions. Visitors can experience the innovative additive manufacturing process live at the fair.

Powder-based additive manufacturing in zero gravity is the name of the project in which a component is produced by applying metallic powder layers and then...

Im Focus: Molecules Brilliantly Illuminated

Physicists at the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics, which is jointly run by Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, have developed a high-power laser system that generates ultrashort pulses of light covering a large share of the mid-infrared spectrum. The researchers envisage a wide range of applications for the technology – in the early diagnosis of cancer, for instance.

Molecules are the building blocks of life. Like all other organisms, we are made of them. They control our biorhythm, and they can also reflect our state of...

Im Focus: Spider silk key to new bone-fixing composite

University of Connecticut researchers have created a biodegradable composite made of silk fibers that can be used to repair broken load-bearing bones without the complications sometimes presented by other materials.

Repairing major load-bearing bones such as those in the leg can be a long and uncomfortable process.

Im Focus: Writing and deleting magnets with lasers

Study published in the journal ACS Applied Materials & Interfaces is the outcome of an international effort that included teams from Dresden and Berlin in Germany, and the US.

Scientists at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) together with colleagues from the Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin (HZB) and the University of Virginia...

Im Focus: Gamma-ray flashes from plasma filaments

Novel highly efficient and brilliant gamma-ray source: Based on model calculations, physicists of the Max PIanck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg propose a novel method for an efficient high-brilliance gamma-ray source. A giant collimated gamma-ray pulse is generated from the interaction of a dense ultra-relativistic electron beam with a thin solid conductor. Energetic gamma-rays are copiously produced as the electron beam splits into filaments while propagating across the conductor. The resulting gamma-ray energy and flux enable novel experiments in nuclear and fundamental physics.

The typical wavelength of light interacting with an object of the microcosm scales with the size of this object. For atoms, this ranges from visible light to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Invitation to the upcoming "Current Topics in Bioinformatics: Big Data in Genomics and Medicine"

13.04.2018 | Event News

Unique scope of UV LED technologies and applications presented in Berlin: ICULTA-2018

12.04.2018 | Event News

IWOLIA: A conference bringing together German Industrie 4.0 and French Industrie du Futur

09.04.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Complete skin regeneration system of fish unraveled

24.04.2018 | Life Sciences

Scientists create innovative new 'green' concrete using graphene

24.04.2018 | Materials Sciences

BAM@Hannover Messe: innovative 3D printing method for space flight

24.04.2018 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>