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New, backlash-free Flender couplings facilitate high positional accuracy

12.10.2015

SPS IPC Drives 2015, Hall 11

  • Can be used in production and machine tools, as well as automation engineering
  • Bipex-S elastomer coupling for applications subject to vibrations and shocks
  • Torsionally rigid Sipex metal bellows coupling for angle-preserving torque transmission

Siemens has completed its portfolio of couplings with the addition of the new backlash-free Flender Bipex-S and Flender Sipex couplings. Both coupling versions can be used in production machines and machine tools, as well as in automation engineering.

They are available in various sizes and can be installed in integrated drive systems, frequently in combination with servo motors. Bipex-S torsionally flexible elastomer couplings are used in applications subject to vibration and shocks; Sipex metal bellows couplings are used in drives that require an absolutely angle-preserving torque transmission.

High-precision applications in machine tool manufacturing, control engineering and processing industries demand a great deal from the performance, quality and precision of couplings and their process reliability. Backlash-free couplings with reliable power transmission form the modular interface between motor and drive machine. They also compensate for offsets between the coupled units.

The backlash-free, breakdown-resistant and vibration-damping Bipex-S couplings are characterized by high power density and electrically isolating properties that protect against leakage currents. They enable a high degree of positional accuracy and reduce the wear on the system through lower peak loads and vibrations. The axial plug-in enables blind assembly. If the elastomer wears away completely, the jaws of the coupling hubs provide emergency running properties.

The extremely torsionally rigid Sipex couplings facilitate angle-preserving torque transmission, which consequently provides the highest positional accuracy. They are non-wearing and maintenance-free, reduce unplanned system and machine downtimes which, in turn, increases system availability. The excellent, true-running properties of the couplings make them particularly suitable for high speeds. Low restoring forces, almost no bearing load in the coupled machines and a good power density round off their positive properties.

The new, backlash-free Bipex-S and Sipex Flender couplings are each available in six hub versions, which enable optimal connection to the shaft ends of the coupled units. They have a low moment of inertia, require little installation space, are easy to mount and are very suitable for use in integrated drive systems. Both series of couplings are used in control, automation and medical engineering, as well as in production machine and machine tool manufacturing. They are installed, for example, in positioning drives, stepper motors, linear units and handling robots.

For further information on the topic of couplings, please see www.siemens.com/couplings


Siemens AG (Berlin and Munich) is a global technology powerhouse that has stood for engineering excellence, innovation, quality, reliability and internationality for more than 165 years. The company is active in more than 200 countries, focusing on the areas of electrification, automation and digitalization. One of the world's largest producers of energy-efficient, resource-saving technologies, Siemens is No. 1 in offshore wind turbine construction, a leading supplier of combined cycle turbines for power generation, a major provider of power transmission solutions and a pioneer in infrastructure solutions as well as automation, drive and software solutions for industry. The company is also a leading provider of medical imaging equipment – such as computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging systems – and a leader in laboratory diagnostics as well as clinical IT. In fiscal 2014, which ended on September 30, 2014, Siemens generated revenue from continuing operations of €71.9 billion and net income of €5.5 billion. At the end of September 2014, the company had around 343,000 employees worldwide on a continuing basis.

Further information is available on the Internet at www.siemens.com


Reference Number: PR2015100344PDEN


Contact
Ms. Ines Giovannini
Process Industries and Drives Division
Siemens AG

Gleiwitzer Str. 555

90475 Nuremberg

Germany

Tel: +49 (911) 895-7946

ines.giovannini​@siemens.com

Ines Giovannini | Siemens Process Industries and Drives

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