Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Have people had enough of silly love songs?

28.09.2004


A University of Southampton academic, who is investigating love songs from the 16th century to the 1970s, claims that not only is that not the case, but also that song plays a vital role in constructing myths of romantic love.



The research, provisionally entitled Silly Love Songs: Gender, Performance and Romance, investigates the relationship between song and romance, tracing the different ways that songs interact with other media, such as novels and films, to articulate the prevailing social views of their time. Its particular focus is on songs that occupy an uneasy place between classical and popular music, high art and ephemera: the kind of songs we love, but that often make us cringe.

Dr. Jeanice Brooks, a Reader in Music at the top Russell Group University, plans to explore in depth the role romance plays in women’s lives in order to understand love songs’ undeniable appeal to female audiences past and present and to shed light on what makes them so powerful and emotionally compelling. In particular, she will look at the role of romance and love songs in elaborating narratives of feminine identity, a topic of controversy amongst feminist historians, sociologists and literary critics.


Three case studies will explore distinct moments in the history of song and romance. The first focuses on late 16th century French court songs and chivalric romance, which helped project the ideals of courtly love in the context of newly prominent images of courtiership. The second looks at the parlour songs of the first half of the 19th century and their relationship to the novel, including those of Jane Austen. Self-accompanied singing of a drawing-room repertory was principally the domain of young unmarried women, part of a courtship process now linked to the ideal of companionate marriage.

The final case study examines film and popular song of the 1970s and the vision of romance projected by mass culture in the wake of the Women’s Movement and the sexual revolution. Materials will include The Way We Were and Love Story, both runaway screen hits with Oscar-winning scores, featuring relationships between young women from marginalized ethnic groups and WASP men. Despite the boom in research on popular culture, ‘soft’ pop music of the late twentieth century, as represented by performers such as Barbra Streisand, has received almost no scholarly attention.

Jeanice explains: ‘My research will break new ground in two ways: by placing at its heart song repertories that have previously been undervalued or neglected; and by adopting an approach which emphasizes performance and the way songs are received by audiences, rather than the composer- and work-centred approach usually taken in music history.’

The outcome of Jeanice’s research – which is due to start in earnest in January next year – is likely to be a book which looks at love songs in relation to books and films. The research is being undertaken with the support of a grant from the Arts and Humanities Research Board.

Sarah Watts | alfa
Further information:
http://www.soton.ac.uk

More articles from Social Sciences:

nachricht Fixating on faces
26.01.2017 | California Institute of Technology

nachricht Internet use in class tied to lower test scores
16.12.2016 | Michigan State University

All articles from Social Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Giant Magnetic Fields in the Universe

Astronomers from Bonn and Tautenburg in Thuringia (Germany) used the 100-m radio telescope at Effelsberg to observe several galaxy clusters. At the edges of these large accumulations of dark matter, stellar systems (galaxies), hot gas, and charged particles, they found magnetic fields that are exceptionally ordered over distances of many million light years. This makes them the most extended magnetic fields in the universe known so far.

The results will be published on March 22 in the journal „Astronomy & Astrophysics“.

Galaxy clusters are the largest gravitationally bound structures in the universe. With a typical extent of about 10 million light years, i.e. 100 times the...

Im Focus: Tracing down linear ubiquitination

Researchers at the Goethe University Frankfurt, together with partners from the University of Tübingen in Germany and Queen Mary University as well as Francis Crick Institute from London (UK) have developed a novel technology to decipher the secret ubiquitin code.

Ubiquitin is a small protein that can be linked to other cellular proteins, thereby controlling and modulating their functions. The attachment occurs in many...

Im Focus: Perovskite edges can be tuned for optoelectronic performance

Layered 2D material improves efficiency for solar cells and LEDs

In the eternal search for next generation high-efficiency solar cells and LEDs, scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory and their partners are creating...

Im Focus: Polymer-coated silicon nanosheets as alternative to graphene: A perfect team for nanoelectronics

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are less stable. Now researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have, for the first time ever, produced a composite material combining silicon nanosheets and a polymer that is both UV-resistant and easy to process. This brings the scientists a significant step closer to industrial applications like flexible displays and photosensors.

Silicon nanosheets are thin, two-dimensional layers with exceptional optoelectronic properties very similar to those of graphene. Albeit, the nanosheets are...

Im Focus: Researchers Imitate Molecular Crowding in Cells

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to simulate these confined natural conditions in artificial vesicles for the first time. As reported in the academic journal Small, the results are offering better insight into the development of nanoreactors and artificial organelles.

Enzymes behave differently in a test tube compared with the molecular scrum of a living cell. Chemists from the University of Basel have now been able to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

International Land Use Symposium ILUS 2017: Call for Abstracts and Registration open

20.03.2017 | Event News

CONNECT 2017: International congress on connective tissue

14.03.2017 | Event News

ICTM Conference: Turbine Construction between Big Data and Additive Manufacturing

07.03.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

When Air is in Short Supply - Shedding light on plant stress reactions when oxygen runs short

23.03.2017 | Life Sciences

Researchers use light to remotely control curvature of plastics

23.03.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Sea ice extent sinks to record lows at both poles

23.03.2017 | Earth Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>