Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

First Research Projects Underway at Diamond Light Source

06.02.2007
This week marks the dawn of a new era of scientific endeavour as Diamond Light Source, the UK’s brand new synchrotron facility, opens its doors for business and welcomes its very first scientific users.

Top academic teams from Durham, Oxford, Leicester and London have been selected to be the first users of one of the brightest sources of light in the world that will enable them to find out more than ever before about the secret structure of the world around us.

These principal projects were selected from a total of 127 proposals received last year from the synchrotron user community. The first users possess an extensive knowledge of synchrotron science and bring a range of research projects to Diamond from cancer research, to advancing data storage techniques, to unravelling the mysteries of the solar system. This will provide Diamond scientists with real projects to assist in the 6 month period of fine-tuning of the first experimental stations that will secure a place for Diamond on the international research stage.

Diamond’s first users include:

David Eastwood, University of Durham (Materials and Magnetism Beamline, I16):
David Eastwood is a post-graduate student working with Professor Brian Tanner at the University of Durham. David will be using Diamond’s X-rays to carry out detailed examinations of new sensors to be used in computer components that ‘read’ the magnetic information stored in its memory. His research will aid the development of smaller and more sensitive sensors to cope with the ever-increasing demand for higher performance computers and electronic equipment.

Prof. Dave Stuart, University of Oxford (Macromolecular Crystallography Beamline, I04):

Dave Stuart is head of Structural Biology at the Wellcome Trust Centre for Human Genetics at the University of Oxford. Dave will be using Diamond’s X-rays to visualise the structure of a protein molecule found on our cells, which is implicated in the development of diseases such as cancer. This project, funded by Cancer Research UK and the UK Medical Research Council, will provide vital knowledge to assist in the design of more effective drugs to combat certain types of cancer.

Prof. Chris Binns, University of Leicester (Nanoscience Beamline, I06):

Chris Binns leads the Condensed Matter Physics Group at the University of Leicester, where his group is interested in studying the properties of magnetic materials. His research is particularly relevant to the development of more advanced electronic data storage devices capable of storing greater volumes of data – essential for the evolution of smaller and smarter electronic devices.

Dr Paul Schofield, The Natural History Museum (Microfocus Spectroscopy Beamline, I18):

Paul Schofield is a researcher in mineral sciences in the Department of Mineralogy at the Natural History Museum. Paul will be using Diamond’s X-rays to examine samples from a meteorite called Santa Catharina, in order to gain an insight into the history of our solar system. Examining the composition and structure of the minerals contained in Santa Catharina will lead to clues regarding the meteorite’s early life and consequently the conditions that shaped the development of the Solar System.

These first research projects will be carried out in experimental stations (or beamlines) that are part of Phase I of development – comprising Diamond’s buildings, the synchrotron machine itself and the first seven beamlines. Phase I investment of £260 million from the UK Government (86%) via CCLRC and the Wellcome Trust (14%), has been used to deliver the facility on time, on budget and to the specifications set out. Funding for Phase II of the project – a further £120 million – was confirmed in October 2004 and will be used to build 15 additional beamlines to expand the range of research applications available at Diamond. Construction has already started on the Phase II beamlines and beyond this, on average four to five new beamlines will be available each year until 2011. As it opens its doors to its first users this month, Diamond is able to celebrate the successful completion of Phase I and contemplate the exciting prospect of entering Phase II.

Jane Bevan / Ruth Harman | alfa
Further information:
http://www.isispr.co.uk

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht SF State astronomer searches for signs of life on Wolf 1061 exoplanet
20.01.2017 | San Francisco State University

nachricht Molecule flash mob
19.01.2017 | Technische Universität Wien

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Helmholtz International Fellow Award for Sarah Amalia Teichmann

20.01.2017 | Awards Funding

An innovative high-performance material: biofibers made from green lacewing silk

20.01.2017 | Materials Sciences

Ion treatments for cardiac arrhythmia — Non-invasive alternative to catheter-based surgery

20.01.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>