Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cooling massive objects to the quantum ground state

02.04.2015

Cooling of macroscopic and mesoscopic objects to the quantum ground states are of great interests not only for fundamental study of quantum theory but also for the broad applications in quantum information processing and high-precision metrology.

However, the cooling limit is subjected to the quantum backaction, and ground state cooling is possible only in the resolved sideband limit, which requires the resonance frequency of the mechanical motion to be larger than the cavity decay rate.


This image shows an optomechanical system with two mechanical modes coupled to the same optical mode.

Credit: ©Science China Press

This sets a major obstacle for the ground state preparation and quantum manipulation of macroscopic and mesoscopic mechanical resonators, since more massive resonators typically have lower mechanical resonance frequencies. Therefore, it is essential to overcome this limitation, so that ground state cooling can be achieved for massive objects.

Very recently, Professor Yun-Feng Xiao and Ph.D student Yong-Chun Liu at Peking University, collaborated with Columbia University, have proposed an unresolved sideband ground-state cooling scheme in a generic optomechanical system, by taking advantage of the destructive quantum interference in a cavity optomechanical system with two mechanical modes coupled to the same optical cavity mode (Figure 1), where optomechanically-induced transparency phenomenon occurs.

They find that using the multiple inputs, the cascaded cooling effect further suppresses the quantum backaction heating. They show that ground state cooling of the mechanical mode beyond the resolved sideband limit by nearly three orders of magnitude can be achieved.

"This cooling approach adds little complexity to the existing optomechanical system, which is crucial in the experimental point of view." said Yong-Chun Liu, the first author of the paper. Compared with the conventional backaction cooling approach, the additional requirement here is a control mechanical mode and one (or more) input laser.

It is experimentally feasible for various optomechanical systems within current technical conditions. On one hand, many optomechanical systems possess abundant mechanical modes with different resonance frequencies, since the oscillation have different types and orders.

This situation can be found in optomechanical systems using whispering-gallery microcavities, photonic crystal cavities, membranes, nanostrings and nanorods amongst others. On the other hand, composite optomechanical systems, containing two independent mechanical resonators, are also conceivable. For example, in Fabry-Perot cavities, the motion of one mirror acts as a control mechanical mode while the other mirror is to be cooled (Figure 1).

"This study paves the way for the manipulation of macroscopic mechanical resonators in the quantum regime." said Yun-Feng Xiao.

###

This research was funded by the National Basic Research Program of China (Grant Nos. 2013CB328704 and 2013CB921904), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11474011, 11222440 and 61435001), the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20120001110068) and the Optical Radiation Cooling and Heating in Integrated Devices Program of Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (Grant No. C11L10831).

See the article:

Yong-Chun Liu, Yun-Feng Xiao, Xingsheng Luan, and Chee Wei Wong, Optomechanically-induced-transparency cooling of massive mechanical resonators to the quantum ground state. Sci China-Phys Mech Astron, 2015, 58: 050305, doi: 10.1007/s11433-014-5635-6

http://phys.scichina.com:8083/sciGe/EN/abstract/abstract509634.shtml

Yong-Chun Liu | EurekAlert!

Further reports about: Cooling Radiation cooling effect frequencies mechanical mirror objects photonic crystal

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Basque researchers turn light upside down
23.02.2018 | Elhuyar Fundazioa

nachricht Attoseconds break into atomic interior
23.02.2018 | Max-Planck-Institut für Quantenoptik

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>