Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

UIC tests diabetes drug in treatment of multiple sclerosis

08.06.2004


Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago are launching a clinical trial to determine whether a drug commonly used for diabetes might be effective in treating multiple sclerosis, an autoimmune disease that affects 350,000 Americans.



In an animal model of the disease, the researchers found that the drug reduced the inflammation of nervous tissue that occurs with multiple sclerosis and prevented the aberrant immune response that ends up destroying the body’s own brain and spinal cord.

"At present, few medications have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of multiple sclerosis," said Douglas Feinstein, associate professor of anesthesiology in the UIC College of Medicine. "These drugs are only partially effective, and none helps significantly in the later, progressive forms of the disease. The drugs also have undesirable side effects, and they need to be injected, making them difficult to administer."


The drug being tested, called pioglitazone, is prescribed for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Marketed by Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, pioglitazone "sensitizes" the body’s cells to insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that lets sugar into cells so that it can be converted into energy. People with type 2 diabetes are unable to use insulin efficiently, leading to elevated blood sugar levels (hyperglycemia) and tissue damage.

Research has shown that drugs like pioglitazone not only raise the levels of certain proteins involved in the uptake and metabolism of glucose but also lower the levels of other molecules involved in the immune response and inflammation.

"It is amazing that this drug, at least in animal tests, has shown a dramatic effect on two different targets of multiple sclerosis, namely the immune system and the inflammation process," Feinstein said.

Feinstein also noted that the drug is available as a tablet, simplifying its administration.

The clinical trial will enroll about 30 patients with relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis, the most common form of the disease. People with this type of multiple sclerosis experience episodes of acute worsening of neurological function, followed by partial or complete recovery. In most patients, the disease will eventually change into a chronic, persistent form, with symptoms worsening throughout life.

Participants in the trial will take a 30-milligram dose of pioglitazone daily for a period of 18 months, during which they will be monitored for any side effects or changes in their symptoms.

"At this stage in the drug trial, we are simply trying to determine whether the drug is safe and can be tolerated by people with multiple sclerosis," Feinstein said. "But we’ll also be doing neurological examinations and biochemical analyses of blood samples, looking for signs of inflammation and immune cell activation to determine whether the drug is having any effect on symptoms of the disease."

Employing UIC’s state-of-the-art magnetic resonance imaging technology, the researchers will do a series of three brain scans over the course of the trial to look for changes in the cerebral lesions associated with multiple sclerosis.

In multiple sclerosis, the T cells of the immune system go awry, attacking proteins in the myelin sheath that insulates the nerve fibers. When the sheath is destroyed, electrical signals that are normally transmitted throughout the brain and spinal cord are disrupted, and the brain is no longer able to correctly send or receive the messages that help control muscle movements.

Patients with multiple sclerosis suffer a range of symptoms, including tingling and numbness, loss of balance, blurry vision, weakness in the limbs, difficulty walking, impaired thinking and even paralysis. The disease affects women about twice as often as men.

In the United States, health care costs for multiple sclerosis are second only to those for Alzheimer’s disease.


Co-directors of the UIC study are Drs. Daniel Hier and Demetrios Skias, in the department of neurology at UIC, and Dr. Dusan Stefoskil, director of the multiple sclerosis clinic at Rush University Medical Center.

The study is funded by Takeda Pharmaceuticals North America, Inc.

Sharon Butler | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uic.edu/depts/mcam/

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Speed data for the brain’s navigation system
06.12.2016 | Deutsches Zentrum für Neurodegenerative Erkrankungen e.V. (DZNE)

nachricht Study suggests possible new target for treating and preventing Alzheimer's
02.12.2016 | Oregon Health & Science University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Significantly more productivity in USP lasers

In recent years, lasers with ultrashort pulses (USP) down to the femtosecond range have become established on an industrial scale. They could advance some applications with the much-lauded “cold ablation” – if that meant they would then achieve more throughput. A new generation of process engineering that will address this issue in particular will be discussed at the “4th UKP Workshop – Ultrafast Laser Technology” in April 2017.

Even back in the 1990s, scientists were comparing materials processing with nanosecond, picosecond and femtosesecond pulses. The result was surprising:...

Im Focus: Shape matters when light meets atom

Mapping the interaction of a single atom with a single photon may inform design of quantum devices

Have you ever wondered how you see the world? Vision is about photons of light, which are packets of energy, interacting with the atoms or molecules in what...

Im Focus: Novel silicon etching technique crafts 3-D gradient refractive index micro-optics

A multi-institutional research collaboration has created a novel approach for fabricating three-dimensional micro-optics through the shape-defined formation of porous silicon (PSi), with broad impacts in integrated optoelectronics, imaging, and photovoltaics.

Working with colleagues at Stanford and The Dow Chemical Company, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign fabricated 3-D birefringent...

Im Focus: Quantum Particles Form Droplets

In experiments with magnetic atoms conducted at extremely low temperatures, scientists have demonstrated a unique phase of matter: The atoms form a new type of quantum liquid or quantum droplet state. These so called quantum droplets may preserve their form in absence of external confinement because of quantum effects. The joint team of experimental physicists from Innsbruck and theoretical physicists from Hannover report on their findings in the journal Physical Review X.

“Our Quantum droplets are in the gas phase but they still drop like a rock,” explains experimental physicist Francesca Ferlaino when talking about the...

Im Focus: MADMAX: Max Planck Institute for Physics takes up axion research

The Max Planck Institute for Physics (MPP) is opening up a new research field. A workshop from November 21 - 22, 2016 will mark the start of activities for an innovative axion experiment. Axions are still only purely hypothetical particles. Their detection could solve two fundamental problems in particle physics: What dark matter consists of and why it has not yet been possible to directly observe a CP violation for the strong interaction.

The “MADMAX” project is the MPP’s commitment to axion research. Axions are so far only a theoretical prediction and are difficult to detect: on the one hand,...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ICTM Conference 2017: Production technology for turbomachine manufacturing of the future

16.11.2016 | Event News

Innovation Day Laser Technology – Laser Additive Manufacturing

01.11.2016 | Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

 
Latest News

Predicting unpredictability: Information theory offers new way to read ice cores

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

Sea ice hit record lows in November

07.12.2016 | Earth Sciences

New material could lead to erasable and rewriteable optical chips

07.12.2016 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>