Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Pathway Identified in Human Lymphoma Points Way to New Blood Cancer Treatments

22.11.2012
A pathway called the “Unfolded Protein Response,” or UPR, a cell’s way of responding to unfolded and misfolded proteins, helps tumor cells escape programmed cell death during the development of lymphoma.

Research, led by Lori Hart, Ph.D., research associate and Constantinos Koumenis, Ph.D., associate professor,and research division director in the Department of Radiation Oncology, both from the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, and Davide Ruggero, Ph.D., associate professor, Department of Urology, University of California, San Francisco, shows for the first time that the UPR is active in patients with human lymphomas and mice genetically bred to develop lymphomas.

Importantly, when the UPR is inactivated, lymphoma cells readily undergo cell death. Their findings appear online in the Journal of Clinical Investigation and will appear in the December 2012 issue.

“The general implications of our work are that components of this pathway may be attractive anti-tumor targets, especially in lymphomas,” says Koumenis. “Indeed, an enzyme called PERK, a kinase that we found to play a central role in UPR, is already being targeted by several groups, in academia and pharmaceutical companies with specific inhibitors.”

The cancer-causing gene c-Myc paradoxically activates both cell proliferation and death. When the cell becomes cancerous, c-Myc–induced death is bypassed, promoting tumor formation. “A critical feature of c-Myc-overexpressing cells is an increased rate of protein synthesis that is essential for Myc’s ability to cause cancer,” says Tom Cunningham, Ph.D., a postdoctoral fellow in the Ruggero lab. “Myc tumor cells use this aberrant production of proteins to block apoptosis and activate the UPR. These cancer cells depend on Myc-induced increases in protein abundance to survive. Therefore, targeting protein synthesis downstream of Myc oncogenic activity may represent a promising new therapeutic window for cancer treatment,” adds Ruggero.

The accumulation of unfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum, an inner cell component where newly made proteins are folded, initiates a stress program, the UPR, to support cell survival. Normally, UPR kicks in when there is an imbalance in the number of proteins that need to be folded and chaperones, specialized proteins that help fold them.

Analysis of mouse and human lymphomas demonstrated significantly higher levels of UPR activation compared with normal tissues. Using multiple genetic models, the two teams, in collaboration with additional labs in the US and Europe, demonstrated that Myc specifically activated one arm of the UPR, leading to increased cell survival by autophagy.

Autophagy is a survival pathway allowing a cell to recycle damaged proteins when it's under stress and reuse the damaged parts to fuel further growth. Cancer cells might be addicted to autophagy, since this innate response may be a critical means by which the cells survive the nutrient limitation and lack of oxygen commonly found within tumors.

Inhibition of one protein, PERK, in the UPR arm studied, significantly reduced Myc-induced autophagy and tumor formation. What’s more, drug- or genetic-mediated inhibition of autophagy increased Myc-dependent cell death.

“Our findings establish a role for UPR as an enhancer of c-Myc–induced lymphomas and suggest that inhibiting UPR may be particularly effective against cancers characterized by c-Myc overexpression,” says Koumenis. “In this context the UPR essentially acts as one of the cell’s rheostats to counterbalance Myc’s runaway cell replication nature and its pro-cell-death tendencies.”

However, Koumenis indicates that further research is needed on the potential effects of PERK inhibition on normal tissues: “Although data from our lab and other groups suggest that PERK inhibition in tumors grown in animals is feasible, other studies suggest that PERK plays a critical role in the function of secretory tissues such as the pancreas. Carefully testing the effects of new PERK inhibitors in animal models of lymphoma and other malignancies in the next couple of years should address this question and could open the way for new clinical trials with such agents.”

Funding for this research came from the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Scholar, America Cancer Society grant 121364-PF-11-184-01-TBG; and National Cancer Institute grants R01 CA094214; R01 CA139362; and R01 CA140456.

This work included several laboratories, including those of Alan Diehl and Serge Fuchs, both from Penn; Andrei Thomas-Tikhonenko from CHOP and Penn; and Ian Mills from the Oslo University Hospital.

Penn Medicine is one of the world's leading academic medical centers, dedicated to the related missions of medical education, biomedical research, and excellence in patient care. Penn Medicine consists of the Raymond and Ruth Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania (founded in 1765 as the nation's first medical school) and the University of Pennsylvania Health System, which together form a $4.3 billion enterprise.

The Perelman School of Medicine is currently ranked #2 in U.S. News & World Report's survey of research-oriented medical schools. The School is consistently among the nation's top recipients of funding from the National Institutes of Health, with $479.3 million awarded in the 2011 fiscal year.

The University of Pennsylvania Health System's patient care facilities include: The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania -- recognized as one of the nation's top "Honor Roll" hospitals by U.S. News & World Report; Penn Presbyterian Medical Center; and Pennsylvania Hospital — the nation's first hospital, founded in 1751. Penn Medicine also includes additional patient care facilities and services throughout the Philadelphia region.

Penn Medicine is committed to improving lives and health through a variety of community-based programs and activities. In fiscal year 2011, Penn Medicine provided $854 million to benefit our community.

Karen Kreeger | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.uphs.upenn.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Real-time imaging of lung lesions during surgery helps localize tumors and improve precision
30.07.2015 | American Association for Thoracic Surgery

nachricht Experimental MERS vaccine shows promise in animal studies
29.07.2015 | NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: On the crest of the wave: Electronics on a time scale shorter than a cycle of light

Physicists from Regensburg and Marburg, Germany have succeeded in taking a slow-motion movie of speeding electrons in a solid driven by a strong light wave. In the process, they have unraveled a novel quantum phenomenon, which will be reported in the forthcoming edition of Nature.

The advent of ever faster electronics featuring clock rates up to the multiple-gigahertz range has revolutionized our day-to-day life. Researchers and...

Im Focus: Superfast fluorescence sets new speed record

Plasmonic device has speed and efficiency to serve optical computers

Researchers have developed an ultrafast light-emitting device that can flip on and off 90 billion times a second and could form the basis of optical computing.

Im Focus: Unlocking the rice immune system

Joint BioEnergy Institute study identifies bacterial protein that is key to protecting rice against bacterial blight

A bacterial signal that when recognized by rice plants enables the plants to resist a devastating blight disease has been identified by a multi-national team...

Im Focus: Smarter window materials can control light and energy

Researchers in the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin are one step closer to delivering smart windows with a new level of energy efficiency, engineering materials that allow windows to reveal light without transferring heat and, conversely, to block light while allowing heat transmission, as described in two new research papers.

By allowing indoor occupants to more precisely control the energy and sunlight passing through a window, the new materials could significantly reduce costs for...

Im Focus: Simulations lead to design of near-frictionless material

Argonne scientists used Mira to identify and improve a new mechanism for eliminating friction, which fed into the development of a hybrid material that exhibited superlubricity at the macroscale for the first time. Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) researchers helped enable the groundbreaking simulations by overcoming a performance bottleneck that doubled the speed of the team's code.

While reviewing the simulation results of a promising new lubricant material, Argonne researcher Sanket Deshmukh stumbled upon a phenomenon that had never been...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

3rd Euro Bio-inspired - International Conference and Exhibition on Bio-inspired Materials

23.07.2015 | Event News

Clash of Realities – International Conference on the Art, Technology and Theory of Digital Games

10.07.2015 | Event News

World Conference on Regenerative Medicine in Leipzig: Last chance to submit abstracts until 2 July

25.06.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Surprising similarity in fly and mouse motion vision

30.07.2015 | Life Sciences

Efficient Infrared Heat Saves Time and Energy in the Manufacture of Motor Vehicle Carpets

30.07.2015 | Trade Fair News

Roentgen prize goes to Dr Eleftherios Goulielmakis

30.07.2015 | Awards Funding

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>