Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Genetics behind the disease SLE almost completed

22.01.2008
A new study has mapped the risk factors behind the autoimmune disease SLE in the entire human genome. The findings of the study, in which researchers from Uppsala University took part, are being presented today in the Web edition of The New England Review of Medicine.

The study charts which of the human being’s some 20,000 are the strongest risk factors for SLE (systemic lupus erythematosus). The analysis was performed with half a million genetic markers, so-called SNP markers, that are evenly distributed across the whole genome.

Two research teams from Uppsala University, Ann-Christine Syvänen’s and Lars Rönnblom’s groups at the Department of Medical Sciences, were part of the group behind the study, which was led by scientists from the U.S. The study included 800 Swedish SLE patients from rheumatology clinics at Akademiska Hospital in Uppsala, Karolinska Hospital in Stockholm, and the university hospitals in Umeå and Lund.

“The study is especially interesting since SLE is seen as a model disease for autoimmune disorders, where the body’s immune defense attacks the patient’s own tissue,” says Lars Rönnblom, professor of rheumatology.

... more about:
»Ann-Christine »Genetic »Genome »SLE »risk factor

In SLE most body organs can be damaged by the autoimmune process. From studies of twins we know that SLE has strong genetic connections where the interaction with environmental factors can lead to the genesis of the disease. With the findings of this new study, researchers can now move on to functional and clinical analyses. Functional analyses can figure out the molecular mechanisms in SLE, which ultimately can lead to better drugs for the disease.

“Since SLE is characterized by many different pathological symptoms, these genetic findings can also lead to genetic tests in the future to make it possible to classify the disease in each individual more exactly, thereby providing support for treatment decisions,” says Ann-Christine Syvänen, professor of molecular medicine.

The new study identifies two previously unknown genes, BLK and ITGAM, with functions in the immune system’s cells, as risk factors for SLE. Moreover, the study identifies two previously known genes from the interferon system, IRF5 and STAT4, and the well-known HLA system as the three strongest risk factors for SLE. These same Uppsala scientists originally identified the IRF5 gene as a risk factor, in 2005.

The genetic analyses of the Swedish patients were done at the SNP genotyping laboratory at Akademiska University Hospital in Uppsala. It became possible only in 2007 to perform genetic analyses on a scale comprising the entire genome, thanks to extremely rapid technological development.

“The advantage of genetic studies across the entire genome is that they unconditionally lead to the identification of all the genes that contribute to the genetic risk for SLE,” says Ann-Christine Syvänen.

Read the article: http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/NEJMoa0707865?resourcetype=HWCIT

One more study on SLE was published today, also including Uppsala researchers: http://info.uu.se/press.nsf/pm/several.genes.id3BB.html

For more information, please contact Ann-Christine Syvänen, phone: +46 (0)18-611 29 59, Ann-Christine.Syvanen@medsci.uu.se, or Lars Rönnblom, +46 (0)18- 611 53 98, Lars.Rönnblom@medsci.uu.se

Anneli Waara | alfa
Further information:
http://www.uu.se
http://content.nejm.org/cgi/content/abstract/NEJMoa0707865?resourcetype=HWCIT

Further reports about: Ann-Christine Genetic Genome SLE risk factor

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Seeking structure with metagenome sequences
20.01.2017 | DOE/Joint Genome Institute

nachricht Snap, Digest, Respire
20.01.2017 | Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg im Breisgau

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Traffic jam in empty space

New success for Konstanz physicists in studying the quantum vacuum

An important step towards a completely new experimental access to quantum physics has been made at University of Konstanz. The team of scientists headed by...

Im Focus: How gut bacteria can make us ill

HZI researchers decipher infection mechanisms of Yersinia and immune responses of the host

Yersiniae cause severe intestinal infections. Studies using Yersinia pseudotuberculosis as a model organism aim to elucidate the infection mechanisms of these...

Im Focus: Interfacial Superconductivity: Magnetic and superconducting order revealed simultaneously

Researchers from the University of Hamburg in Germany, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Aarhus in Denmark, have synthesized a new superconducting material by growing a few layers of an antiferromagnetic transition-metal chalcogenide on a bismuth-based topological insulator, both being non-superconducting materials.

While superconductivity and magnetism are generally believed to be mutually exclusive, surprisingly, in this new material, superconducting correlations...

Im Focus: Studying fundamental particles in materials

Laser-driving of semimetals allows creating novel quasiparticle states within condensed matter systems and switching between different states on ultrafast time scales

Studying properties of fundamental particles in condensed matter systems is a promising approach to quantum field theory. Quasiparticles offer the opportunity...

Im Focus: Designing Architecture with Solar Building Envelopes

Among the general public, solar thermal energy is currently associated with dark blue, rectangular collectors on building roofs. Technologies are needed for aesthetically high quality architecture which offer the architect more room for manoeuvre when it comes to low- and plus-energy buildings. With the “ArKol” project, researchers at Fraunhofer ISE together with partners are currently developing two façade collectors for solar thermal energy generation, which permit a high degree of design flexibility: a strip collector for opaque façade sections and a solar thermal blind for transparent sections. The current state of the two developments will be presented at the BAU 2017 trade fair.

As part of the “ArKol – development of architecturally highly integrated façade collectors with heat pipes” project, Fraunhofer ISE together with its partners...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Sustainable Water use in Agriculture in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

19.01.2017 | Event News

12V, 48V, high-voltage – trends in E/E automotive architecture

10.01.2017 | Event News

2nd Conference on Non-Textual Information on 10 and 11 May 2017 in Hannover

09.01.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New Study Will Help Find the Best Locations for Thermal Power Stations in Iceland

19.01.2017 | Earth Sciences

Not of Divided Mind

19.01.2017 | Life Sciences

Molecule flash mob

19.01.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>