Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Light and Air

19.11.2012
Sunlight-driven CO2 fixation

The increased use of renewable energy sources, particularly sunlight, is highly desirable, as is industrial production that is as CO2-neutral as possible. Both of these wishes could be fulfilled if CO2 could be used as the raw material in a system driven by solar energy.



Japanese researchers have now introduced an approach to this type of process in the journal Angewandte Chemie. Their method is based on a principle similar to natural photosynthesis.

The use of carbon dioxide as a source of carbon may be an attractive option for reducing the consumption of fossil feedstocks and improving the CO2 footprint of chemical products. The biggest obstacle in our way is the high stability of the CO2 molecule. One of the possibilities for jumping this hurdle is to use very high-energy molecules to react with CO2.

The photosynthetic process in green plants provides an example of how this could work. This process takes place in two steps: the light reactions and the dark reactions. In the light reactions, the photosynthetic system captures photons and stores their energy in the form of energetic chemical compounds. These are subsequently used to drive the dark reactions that use CO2 as a carbon source to synthesize complex sugar molecules.

Researchers working with Masahiro Murakami at Kyoto University used the same principle to design their process. In this case, the first step is also a reaction driven by light. The action of UV light can convert the starting material, an á-methylamino ketone, to a very energetic molecule.

This also works with sunlight, as the researchers found out. An intramolecular rearrangement with ring closure results in a molecule containing a ring made of three carbon atoms and one nitrogen atom. This type of ring is under a great deal of strain and is correspondingly reactive. This “light reaction” was coupled to a “dark reaction”: In the subsequent light-independent step, the highly energetic compound captures CO2 in the presence of a base. This forms a cyclic amino-substituted carbonic acid diester that could be useful as an intermediate for chemical syntheses.

The striking thing about this reaction scheme is that the technique is simple. Diffuse sunlight on cloudy days is enough to drive the process. The second step can be carried out in the same reaction vessel through simple addition of the base and heating to 60 °C. The yield is 83 %. In addition, the process is very adaptable because a wide variety of á-methylamino ketones can be used as starting materials.

About the Author
Dr Masahiro Murakami is a Professor of Kyoto University. He has been working in the area of organic chemistry and organometallic chemistry, especially the development of new reactions directed towards organic synthesis. He is the recipient of the Nagoya Silver Medal.
Author: Masahiro Murakami, Kyoto University (Japan), http://www.sbchem.kyoto-u.ac.jp/murakami-lab/contact/contact.html
Title: Solar-Driven Incorporation of Carbon Dioxide into á-Amino Ketones
Angewandte Chemie International Edition 2012, 51, No. 47, 11750–11752, Permalink to the article: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201206166

Masahiro Murakami | Wiley-VCH
Further information:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/anie.201206166
http://pressroom.angewandte.org

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Subcutaneous Administration of Multispecific Antibody Makes Tumor Treatment Faster & More Tolerable
01.07.2015 | Helmholtz Zentrum München - Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Gesundheit und Umwelt

nachricht Why human egg cells don't age well
01.07.2015 | RIKEN

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: X-rays and electrons join forces to map catalytic reactions in real-time

New technique combines electron microscopy and synchrotron X-rays to track chemical reactions under real operating conditions

A new technique pioneered at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory reveals atomic-scale changes during catalytic reactions in real...

Im Focus: Iron: A biological element?

Think of an object made of iron: An I-beam, a car frame, a nail. Now imagine that half of the iron in that object owes its existence to bacteria living two and a half billion years ago.

Think of an object made of iron: An I-beam, a car frame, a nail. Now imagine that half of the iron in that object owes its existence to bacteria living two and...

Im Focus: Thousands of Droplets for Diagnostics

Researchers develop new method enabling DNA molecules to be counted in just 30 minutes

A team of scientists including PhD student Friedrich Schuler from the Laboratory of MEMS Applications at the Department of Microsystems Engineering (IMTEK) of...

Im Focus: Bionic eye clinical trial results show long-term safety, efficacy vision-restoring implant

Patients using Argus II experienced significant improvement in visual function and quality of life

The three-year clinical trial results of the retinal implant popularly known as the "bionic eye," have proven the long-term efficacy, safety and reliability of...

Im Focus: Lasers for Fast Internet in Space – Space Technology from Aachen

On June 23, the second Sentinel mission was launched from the space mission launch center in Kourou. A critical component of Aachen is on board. Researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Laser Technology ILT and Tesat-Spacecom have jointly developed the know-how for space-qualified laser components. For the Sentinel mission the diode laser pump module of the Laser Communication Terminal LCT was planned and constructed in Aachen in cooperation with the manufacturer of the LCT, Tesat-Spacecom, and the Ferdinand Braun Institute.

After eight years of preparation, in the early morning of June 23 the time had come: in Kourou in French Guiana, the European Space Agency launched the...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

World Conference on Regenerative Medicine in Leipzig: Last chance to submit abstracts until 2 July

25.06.2015 | Event News

World Conference on Regenerative Medicine: Abstract Submission has been extended to 24 June

16.06.2015 | Event News

MUSE hosting Europe’s largest science communication conference

11.06.2015 | Event News

 
Latest News

Liquids on Fibers - Slipping or Flowing?

01.07.2015 | Physics and Astronomy

Ultrasonic Fingerprint Sensor May Take Smartphone Security to New Level

01.07.2015 | Materials Sciences

Europeans have unknowingly contributed to the spread of invasive plant species in North America

01.07.2015 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>