Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


2 Cell Transplantation studies impact dental stem cell research for therapeutic purposes

Two studies appearing in a recent issue of Cell Transplantation (20:11-12), now freely available on-line at, evaluate stem cells derived from dental tissues for characteristics that may make them therapeutically useful and appropriate for transplantation purposes.

Induced pluripotent stem cells from immature dental pulp stem cells

A Brazilian and American team of researchers used human immature dental pulp stem cells (IDPSCs) as an alternative source for creating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), stem cells that can be derived from several kinds of adult tissues. According to the study authors, production of iPSCs "opens new opportunities for increased understanding of human genetic diseases and embryogenesis" and will likely have a "great impact on future drug screening and toxicology tests."

The authors note, however, that the reprogramming methodology for making iPSCs is relatively new and "needs refining" in terms of technique, efficiency and cell type choice.

The researchers report that they easily, and in a short time frame, programmed human immature dental pulp stem cells into iPSCs with the hallmarks of pluripotent stem cells.

"Human IDPSCs can be easily derived from dental pulp extracted from adult or 'baby teeth' during routine dental visits," said study lead author Dr. Patricia C.B. Beltrao-Braga of the highly ranked National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem and Cell Therapy in Ribeirao Preto, Brazil. "hIDPSCs are immunologically privileged and can be used in the absence of any immune suppression protocol and have valuable cell therapy applications, including reconstruction of large cranial defects."
Contact: Dr. Patricia C.B. Beltrao-Braga, National Institute of Science and Technology in Stem Cell and Cell Therapy, 2051 Tenente Catao Roxo St. Ribeirao Preto, Brazil.
Tel. 55 (11) 3091-7690
Citation: Beltrão-Braga, P. C. B.; Pignatari, G. C.; Maiorka, P. C.; Oliveira, N. A. J.; Lizier, N. F.; Wenceslau, C. V.; Miglino, M. A.; Muotri, A. R.; Kerkis, I.

Feeder-free derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human immature dental pulp stem cells. Cell Transplant. 20(11-12):1707-1719;2011.

Human dental cells analyzed for telomere length, telomerase activity

A research team from the Republic of Korea has isolated a population of stem cells derived from dental tissues of third molars and found that human dental papilla stem cells (DPaSCs; dental papilla develops into dentin and dental pulp) have biological features similar to bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in terms of telomere length, telomerase activity and reverse transcriptase (Rtase) activity.
MSCs, one of the most studied and clinically important populations of adult stem cells, do have shortcomings associated with their isolation and expansion from bone marrow, said study lead author Dr. Gyu-Jin Rho of the College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, Republic of Korea.

"The role of telomere and telomerase are critical biological features of normal tissue stem and progenitor cells," said Dr. Rho. "Telomeres are a specialized region of repetitive DNA, and telomere shortening is related to cellular life span. Lack of telomerase indicates cellular aging. We compared the telomere length and telomerase activity in DPaSCs with those in MSCs and found that DPaSCs possessed ideal characteristics on telomere length, telomerase activity and reverse transcriptase activity, making DPaSCs suitable alternative candidates for regenerative medicine."

The researchers concluded that DPaSCs could provide a source of stem cells for tooth regeneration and repair as well as a wide range of regenerative medicine applications in humans.

"These two studies highlight the potential value of two populations of stem cells that can be derived from the immature dental pulp and papilla of teeth" said Dr. Shinn-Zong Lin, professor of Neurosurgery and superintendent at the China Medical University Hospital, Beigang, Taiwan. "Their MSC-like abilities, ease of transformation to induced pluripotent stem cells, and ease of availability make them a potentially valuable cell therapy".

Contact: Dr. Gyu-Jin Rho, DVM, PhD, College of Veterinary Medicine, Gyeongsang National University, 900 Gazwa, Jinju, GN, Republic of Korea 660-701.
Tel. (+82) 55-751-5824
Fax. (+82) 55-751-5803
Citation: Jeon, B. G.; Kang, E. J.; Mohana Kumar, B.; Maeng, G. H.; Ock, S. A.; Kwack, D. O.; Park, B. W.; Rho, G. J. Comparative Analysis of Telomere Length, Telomerase and Reverse Transcriptase Activity in Human Dental Stem Cells. Cell Transplant. 20(11-12):1693-1705; 2011.

The Coeditor-in-chief's for Cell Transplantation are at the Center for Neuropsychiatry, China Medical University Hospital, Beigang, Taiwan, and the Diabetes Research Institute, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Contact, Shinn-Zong Lin, MD, PhD at or Camillo Ricordi, MD at or David Eve, PhD at

News release by Florida Science Communications

David Eve | EurekAlert!
Further information:

More articles from Life Sciences:

nachricht Novel mechanisms of action discovered for the skin cancer medication Imiquimod
21.10.2016 | Technische Universität München

nachricht Second research flight into zero gravity
21.10.2016 | Universität Zürich

All articles from Life Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

Im Focus: New Products - Highlights of COMPAMED 2016

COMPAMED has become the leading international marketplace for suppliers of medical manufacturing. The trade fair, which takes place every November and is co-located to MEDICA in Dusseldorf, has been steadily growing over the past years and shows that medical technology remains a rapidly growing market.

In 2016, the joint pavilion by the IVAM Microtechnology Network, the Product Market “High-tech for Medical Devices”, will be located in Hall 8a again and will...

Im Focus: Ultra-thin ferroelectric material for next-generation electronics

'Ferroelectric' materials can switch between different states of electrical polarization in response to an external electric field. This flexibility means they show promise for many applications, for example in electronic devices and computer memory. Current ferroelectric materials are highly valued for their thermal and chemical stability and rapid electro-mechanical responses, but creating a material that is scalable down to the tiny sizes needed for technologies like silicon-based semiconductors (Si-based CMOS) has proven challenging.

Now, Hiroshi Funakubo and co-workers at the Tokyo Institute of Technology, in collaboration with researchers across Japan, have conducted experiments to...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

Resolving the mystery of preeclampsia

21.10.2016 | Health and Medicine

Stanford researchers create new special-purpose computer that may someday save us billions

21.10.2016 | Information Technology

From ancient fossils to future cars

21.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

More VideoLinks >>>