Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Digital assistant monitors respiration

27.02.2008
Patients with respiratory diseases have to adapt their lifestyle to the illness. A digital assistant can help them to do so, using a respiration monitoring system integrated directly in their clothing. Fraunhofer researchers will be presenting the technology at CeBIT in Hanover on March 4 through 9.

Avoid irritants, breathe properly, have plenty to drink, get regular exercise, keep an asthma diary – patients with chronic respiratory diseases have to lead a highly disciplined life. In future, a digital patient assistant can help them to do so: It keeps a log of their behavior, reminds them to do their breathing exercises, provides telemedical services and a direct line to the therapist, and provides them with information such as suitable bicycle tours. Research scientists from the Fraunhofer Institutes for Software and Systems Engineering ISST and for Integrated Circuits IIS will be presenting the system at CeBIT, using a bicycle guide as an example.

The digital assistant acts as a navigation device and tells the cyclists about places of interest with the aid of video clips. More than anything, however, it takes care of the person’s health needs, as ISST project manager Thomas Königsmann reports: “The PDA suggests suitable tours and monitors the patient’s respiration values during the bicycle tour.” In the evening, the doctor can check out the data and get an idea of how the patient’s health is progressing. If necessary, he or she can adjust the medication dosage on the basis of the data obtained.

The patient’s respiration can be monitored with the RespiSENS measuring system developed by researchers at the Fraunhofer Institute for Integrated Circuits IIS. This is integrated directly in an item of clothing, and registers how fast and how strongly the wearer is breathing. The measurements are taken with the aid of respiration straps, which are conductors integrated into a T-shirt in a zig-zag pattern across the patient’s chest and stomach, and which emit an electric signal when expanded. The raw data are transmitted to a tiny module that records and processes them, then transmits the information to a cell phone or a PDA. If the value fails to reach a certain pre-defined level, the system sets off an alarm. “The device requires only a very low current, and is so small that it causes no discomfort in the patient’s clothing,” says project manager Andreas Tobola. “The module itself is no bigger than a matchbook, and then there is a small rechargeable battery for the power supply.” The measuring system is suitable for a wide range of applications: in the diagnosis of sleep disorders, in remote care of patients or even in sports. Professional and amateur athletes can use it to measure their breathing rate and effort with great reliability.

The digital patient assistant and the RespiSENS measuring system will be on display at the Fraunhofer stand B36 in Hall 9.

Britta Schmitz | alfa
Further information:
http://www.fraunhofer.de

More articles from Information Technology:

nachricht The TU Ilmenau develops tomorrow’s chip technology today
27.04.2017 | Technische Universität Ilmenau

nachricht Five developments for improved data exploitation
19.04.2017 | Deutsches Forschungszentrum für Künstliche Intelligenz GmbH, DFKI

All articles from Information Technology >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Making lightweight construction suitable for series production

More and more automobile companies are focusing on body parts made of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP). However, manufacturing and repair costs must be further reduced in order to make CFRP more economical in use. Together with the Volkswagen AG and five other partners in the project HolQueSt 3D, the Laser Zentrum Hannover e.V. (LZH) has developed laser processes for the automatic trimming, drilling and repair of three-dimensional components.

Automated manufacturing processes are the basis for ultimately establishing the series production of CFRP components. In the project HolQueSt 3D, the LZH has...

Im Focus: Wonder material? Novel nanotube structure strengthens thin films for flexible electronics

Reflecting the structure of composites found in nature and the ancient world, researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have synthesized thin carbon nanotube (CNT) textiles that exhibit both high electrical conductivity and a level of toughness that is about fifty times higher than copper films, currently used in electronics.

"The structural robustness of thin metal films has significant importance for the reliable operation of smart skin and flexible electronics including...

Im Focus: Deep inside Galaxy M87

The nearby, giant radio galaxy M87 hosts a supermassive black hole (BH) and is well-known for its bright jet dominating the spectrum over ten orders of magnitude in frequency. Due to its proximity, jet prominence, and the large black hole mass, M87 is the best laboratory for investigating the formation, acceleration, and collimation of relativistic jets. A research team led by Silke Britzen from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, has found strong indication for turbulent processes connecting the accretion disk and the jet of that galaxy providing insights into the longstanding problem of the origin of astrophysical jets.

Supermassive black holes form some of the most enigmatic phenomena in astrophysics. Their enormous energy output is supposed to be generated by the...

Im Focus: A Quantum Low Pass for Photons

Physicists in Garching observe novel quantum effect that limits the number of emitted photons.

The probability to find a certain number of photons inside a laser pulse usually corresponds to a classical distribution of independent events, the so-called...

Im Focus: Microprocessors based on a layer of just three atoms

Microprocessors based on atomically thin materials hold the promise of the evolution of traditional processors as well as new applications in the field of flexible electronics. Now, a TU Wien research team led by Thomas Müller has made a breakthrough in this field as part of an ongoing research project.

Two-dimensional materials, or 2D materials for short, are extremely versatile, although – or often more precisely because – they are made up of just one or a...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Expert meeting “Health Business Connect” will connect international medical technology companies

20.04.2017 | Event News

Wenn der Computer das Gehirn austrickst

18.04.2017 | Event News

7th International Conference on Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaics in Freiburg on April 3-5, 2017

03.04.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

From volcano's slope, NASA instrument looks sky high and to the future

27.04.2017 | Earth Sciences

Control of molecular motion by metal-plated 3-D printed plastic pieces

27.04.2017 | Materials Sciences

Move over, Superman! NIST method sees through concrete to detect early-stage corrosion

27.04.2017 | Materials Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>