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International Conference "How Efficient is Electro mobility?"

08.05.2015

Das Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg (HWK), die Universität Oldenburg und NEXT ENERGY, EWE-Forschungszentrum für Energietechnologie e.V. veranstalten gemeinsam eine Konferenz vom 04. bis 05. Juni 2015, bei der es um die Frage nach der tatsächlichen Effizienz von Elektromobilität geht.

Erwartet werden internationale Forscher aus den unterschiedlichsten Bereichen von Wissenschaft und Industrie. Sie werden sich mit dem Einsatz von kritischen Materialien und deren Rückgewinnung auseinandersetzen.

An der Organisation beteiligt sind auch Wissenschaftler von der Shanghai Jiao Tong University in China und der University of Waterloo (Kanada).

Im Folgenden die englische Ankündigung der Tagung:

What do we really know about the efficiency of electro mobility? Automobiles for example are becoming lighter, smarter, safer and steadily more electric. Each of these trends will demand new types and new combinations of materials – materials and systems that will be increasingly complex.

The Hanse-Wissenschaftskolleg (Institute for Advanced Study, HWK) in Delmenhorst together with the Carl von Ossietzky University Oldenburg, the EWE Research Centre NEXT ENERGY, and international partners in the P.R. China and Canada organizes an international conference “How Efficient is Electro Mobility”. The conference will be held on June 4 and 5 at the HWK; preceding the conference an excursion to two industrial sites in Bremen will take place (June 3).

This conference explores the future of electro mobility and searches for answers to the “efficiency question”. The future challenges for developers and manufacturers of vehicles may no longer be issues of energy efficiency and fuels.

Instead, new questions will arise regarding the use of new, sometimes scarce and environmentally problematic materials and their role in new drive trains as well as questions about systems integration, especially with the increasing importance of renewable energy and decentralized energy systems. These questions will result in new challenges for the life cycle management of vehicles, materials and systems.

The conference will bring together international researchers from academia and industry in different domains. They shall discuss across disciplinary borders crucial questions related to the energy and material shift in vehicles caused by new drive trains and power sources, such as batteries and fuel cells.

The envisioned integration of vehicles and their batteries into the electricity system further contributes to the mentioned shift as use phases overlap and are becoming indistinct.

Contact:
Wolfgang Stenzel, E-Mail: wstenzel@h-w-k.de
Dr.-Ing. Alexandra Pehlken, E-Mail: alexandra.pehlken@uni-oldenburg.de

Weitere Informationen:

More information about the schedule, registration procedure, and fees:
http://www.phd-renewable-energy.de/en/events/e-mobility-2015/

Heidi Müller-Henicz | idw - Informationsdienst Wissenschaft

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