Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Impressive research in Dutch Electrical Engineering

01.03.2007
An international evaluation committee has passed a positive judgment on the Electrical Engineering research in Delft, Eindhoven, and Twente. The committee is impressed by the scope and the quality of Dutch Electrical Engineering research. Committee chairman prof.dr. Joos Vandewalle, MSc, will present the report to President of the TU/e Executive Board Amandus Lundqvist on Thursday March 8.

In the years 1999-2004 the three universities spent an estimated 300 million euros on research in Electrical Engineering. In addition to 339 doctoral dissertations, scientists in Delft, Eindhoven, and Twente also published 2014 publications in international scientific journals.

The committee judged the quality of this research to be very good (on average a 3.8 out of 5). The best work is up to the highest international standards. Dutch scientific research in Electrical Engineering has made a substantial contribution to the development of new concepts, methodology, and applications. The total research output has increased with 35% during the period under evaluation. Although there has been an increase in the number of temporary positions for junior researchers, there are fewer permanent, senior-staff positions.

The programs under evaluation focus on micro-electronics (computer chips and electric systems), sensors, electricity supply, telecommunication, signal-processing, and operating systems. These are areas that are often not familiar to the larger public, because the technology is integrated inconspicuously in products such as telephones, laptops, cars, and electric systems.

The committee consisted of prof.dr. Piet Demeester, MSc (Belgium), prof.dr. Klaus Fröhlich (Germany), prof.dr.techn. Josef Nossek (Germany), dr. Carel van der Poel, MSc (Philips), prof.dr. Willy Sansen (Belgium), prof.dr. Kristian Stubkjaer (Denmark), Eric van Utteren, MA (PROGRESS), and was chaired by prof.dr. Joos Vandewalle, MSc (Belgium). The committee assessed the quality, productivity, relevance, and future prospects of the 37 research programs. The research evaluation was commissioned by the Technical University Delft, the Technical University Eindhoven, and the University of Twente and was executed under the supervision of the independent foundation Quality Assurance Netherlands Universities (QANU). The report can be downloaded from the QANU website (www.qanu.nl/comasy/uploadedfiles/report_electrical_engineering.pdf).

Xavier Theunissen | alfa
Further information:
http://www.tue.nl

More articles from Power and Electrical Engineering:

nachricht Waste from paper and pulp industry supplies raw material for development of new redox flow batteries
12.10.2017 | Johannes Gutenberg-Universität Mainz

nachricht Low-cost battery from waste graphite
11.10.2017 | Empa - Eidgenössische Materialprüfungs- und Forschungsanstalt

All articles from Power and Electrical Engineering >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Smart sensors for efficient processes

Material defects in end products can quickly result in failures in many areas of industry, and have a massive impact on the safe use of their products. This is why, in the field of quality assurance, intelligent, nondestructive sensor systems play a key role. They allow testing components and parts in a rapid and cost-efficient manner without destroying the actual product or changing its surface. Experts from the Fraunhofer IZFP in Saarbrücken will be presenting two exhibits at the Blechexpo in Stuttgart from 7–10 November 2017 that allow fast, reliable, and automated characterization of materials and detection of defects (Hall 5, Booth 5306).

When quality testing uses time-consuming destructive test methods, it can result in enormous costs due to damaging or destroying the products. And given that...

Im Focus: Cold molecules on collision course

Using a new cooling technique MPQ scientists succeed at observing collisions in a dense beam of cold and slow dipolar molecules.

How do chemical reactions proceed at extremely low temperatures? The answer requires the investigation of molecular samples that are cold, dense, and slow at...

Im Focus: Shrinking the proton again!

Scientists from the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, using high precision laser spectroscopy of atomic hydrogen, confirm the surprisingly small value of the proton radius determined from muonic hydrogen.

It was one of the breakthroughs of the year 2010: Laser spectroscopy of muonic hydrogen resulted in a value for the proton charge radius that was significantly...

Im Focus: New nanomaterial can extract hydrogen fuel from seawater

Hybrid material converts more sunlight and can weather seawater's harsh conditions

It's possible to produce hydrogen to power fuel cells by extracting the gas from seawater, but the electricity required to do it makes the process costly. UCF...

Im Focus: Small collisions make big impact on Mercury's thin atmosphere

Mercury, our smallest planetary neighbor, has very little to call an atmosphere, but it does have a strange weather pattern: morning micro-meteor showers.

Recent modeling along with previously published results from NASA's MESSENGER spacecraft -- short for Mercury Surface, Space Environment, Geochemistry and...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

World Health Summit 2017: International experts set the course for the future of Global Health

10.10.2017 | Event News

Climate Engineering Conference 2017 Opens in Berlin

10.10.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Taking screening methods to the next level

17.10.2017 | Life Sciences

ASEAN Member States discuss the future role of renewable energy

17.10.2017 | Event News

‘Find the Lady’ in the quantum world

17.10.2017 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>