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Monitoring and optimizing energy flows in the iron and steel industry

12.05.2011
The Siemens modular Energy Management System creates transparency and reduces energy costs

Siemens has developed a new energy management system that helps plant operators in the iron and steel industry to monitor and optimize their energy flows. The Simetal Energy Management System is a modularly structured solution that can be expanded flexibly. It contributes toward making efficiency levels and losses transparent throughout the entire production plant.

It not only detects avoidable energy losses, but can also generate consumption forecasts and minimize peak loads. The system also supports the use of low-priced energy tariffs, reduces energy costs, and consequently increases competitiveness.

Energy costs are a major factor for the iron and steel industry. They account for between 20 and 30 percent of total costs, and are tending to rise. Energy-efficient production is, therefore, becoming an ever more important competitive advantage. However, this depends on identifying energy consumptions, efficiencies and losses precisely and reliably throughout the entire production plant. Furthermore, standard EN 16001 (ISO 50001) stipulates the logging of energy-relevant data and long-term improvement management for operational energy management.

The Siemens Energy Management System provides the basis for the detailed recording and analysis of all relevant consumption values.

The Simetal Energy Management System has a modular structure, and enables a suitable solution to be found for every plant. For example, the user can freely combine modules for the operation and control system level, information and data management, together with modules for analyzing, forecasting and optimizing electricity, steam and gas to match his specific requirements. The user is supported in this process by an expert system that suggests suitable combinations.

Incoming data are recorded via standardized interfaces and made available for evaluation. This can also be done via remote access. The Energy Management System also has a user-friendly operating and visualization interface for preparing all energy-related measured values from the field level. The client-server system can be expanded step-by-step, and is freely configurable.

Individual add-on modules – including those for further-reaching functionalities – can be integrated at a later date. Reports and documents can be viewed and data exchanged throughout the company via a Web interface.
A range of functions is available for recording and evaluating all energy-relevant data. For example: energy imports can be optimized by more accurate forecasts of energy consumption. The load management indicates how expensive peak loads can be avoided. The assignment of costs provides the transparency required by management. All energy data can be quickly and easily analyzed, and even individually evaluated, with the aid of an automated reporting system, reliable key figures and objective-oriented visualization. Other functions of the energy management system include flexible energy data analysis, the optimization of existing and new supply contracts, and the monitoring of CO2 emissions. Deviations from normal operations are detected by an efficient alarm

and fault management system.

Further information about solutions for steel works, rolling mills and processing lines is available at: http://www.siemens.com/metals

The Siemens Industry Sector (Erlangen, Germany) is the worldwide leading supplier of environmentally friendly production, transportation, building and lighting technologies. With integrated automation technologies and comprehensive industry-specific solutions, Siemens increases the productivity, efficiency and flexibility of its customers in the fields of industry and infrastructure. The Sector consists of six divisions: Building Technologies, Drive Technologies, Industry Automation, Industry Solutions, Mobility and Osram. With around 204,000 employees worldwide (September 30), Siemens Industry achieved in fiscal year 2010 total sales of approximately €34.9 billion. www.siemens.com/industry

The Siemens Industry Solutions Division (Erlangen, Germany) is one of the world's leading solution and service providers for industrial and infrastructure facilities comprising the business activities of Siemens VAI Metals Technologies, Water Technologies and Industrial Technologies. Activities include engineering and installation, operation and service for the entire life cycle. A wide-ranging portfolio of environmental solutions helps industrial companies to use energy, water and equipment efficiently, reduce emissions and comply with environmental guidelines. With around 29,000 employees worldwide (September 30), Siemens Industry Solutions posted sales of €6.0 billion in fiscal year 2010. www.siemens.com/industry-solutions

Dr. Rainer Schulze | Siemens Industry
Further information:
http://www.siemens.com/metals

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