Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Supporting Families Can Lead to Healthier, More Productive Workers

21.08.2009
Researchers at the Center for Work-Family Stress, Safety and Health (CWFSSH), housed at Portland State University, and Michigan State University were awarded $4.1M grant to take part in a 5-year study evaluating innovative workplace change initiatives designed to improve employee health. This study is part of an NIH $30 M initiative to improve worker health and business work-family practices.

Drs. Leslie Hammer of Portland State University and Ellen Ernst Kossek at Michigan State University identified behaviors consistent with being a "family-supportive supervisor" and developed a training program around those behaviors.

Follow-up research showed that employees with family-supportive supervisors reported better overall health, lower blood pressure, lower turnover intentions, improved safety, and greater productivity, when compared with employees whose supervisors who weren't as supportive.

"Our training provided managers with tools for being more supportive of employees with family and non-work demands. This training proved to be beneficial for both the employer and the employee in terms of effectiveness and well-being," Hammer stated.

Kossek sees the study as timely, given our current economic crisis. "Businesses are searching for new ways to manage in a tough economy. Our study shows that just teaching managers to be more supportive can have cost savings for turnover, lower stress, which all affect the bottom line." These cost savings could translate to lower health care costs as well.

The findings of the project are of great interest to employers in the public and private sphere.

To read more and keep informed about the ongoing PSU-MSU project, please visit the CWFSSH website at
www.wfsupport.psy.pdx.edu . For information about the larger Network, please link to www.workfamilyhealthnetwork.org.

About the researchers
Dr. Leslie Hammer is a professor of psychology at Portland State University and the Director of the Center for Work-Family Stress, Safety and Health at Portland State. Dr. Hammer is also the founding president of the Society for Occupational Health Psychology,
and a co-author of Working Families Caring for Children and Aging Parents; Effects on Work and
Well-Being. (hammerl@pdx.edu).

Dr. Ellen Ernst Kossek is a University Distinguished Professor in the School of Labor and Industrial Relations at Michigan State University and the Co-Director of the Center for Work-Family Stress, Safety and Health. She is also a co-author of CEO of Me: Creating a Life that Works in the Flexible Job Age and is the 2008 National Academy of Management Sage Scholarship Award Recipient for making lifetime contributions to research on gender and diversity in organizations (kossek@msu.edu).

About Portland State University
Portland State University (PSU) serves as a center of opportunity for over 27,000 undergraduate and graduate students. Located in Portland, Oregon, one of the nation’s most livable cities, the University’s innovative approach to education combines academic rigor in the classroom with field-based experiences through internships and classroom projects with community partners. The University’s 49-acre downtown campus exhibits Portland State’s commitment to sustainability with green buildings, while many of the 125 bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees incorporate sustainability into the curriculum. PSU’s motto, “Let Knowledge Serve the City,” inspires the teaching and research of an accomplished faculty whose work and students span the globe.

About the Center for Work-Family Stress, Safety and Health (CWFSSH)
CCWFSSH's research is part of a larger collaborative, The Work, Family and Health Network (WFHN) funded by the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control, which is examining how company policies supportive of working families affect the health and well-being of employees and their families. In addition to Portland State University and Michigan State University, the network is comprised of interdisciplinary research teams from the University of Minnesota, Penn State University, Harvard University, Kaiser Permanente's Center for Health Research, and RTI International. In addition, consultants at Oregon Health Sciences University, Northwest Education, Training and Assessment, and Culture Rx, are contributing their expertise.

Scott Gallagher | Portland State University
Further information:
http://www.pdx.edu

More articles from Business and Finance:

nachricht Mathematical confirmation: Rewiring financial networks reduces systemic risk
22.06.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht Frugal Innovations: when less is more
19.04.2017 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Arbeitswirtschaft und Organisation IAO

All articles from Business and Finance >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Abrupt motion sharpens x-ray pulses

Spectrally narrow x-ray pulses may be “sharpened” by purely mechanical means. This sounds surprisingly, but a team of theoretical and experimental physicists developed and realized such a method. It is based on fast motions, precisely synchronized with the pulses, of a target interacting with the x-ray light. Thereby, photons are redistributed within the x-ray pulse to the desired spectral region.

A team of theoretical physicists from the MPI for Nuclear Physics (MPIK) in Heidelberg has developed a novel method to intensify the spectrally broad x-ray...

Im Focus: Physicists Design Ultrafocused Pulses

Physicists working with researcher Oriol Romero-Isart devised a new simple scheme to theoretically generate arbitrarily short and focused electromagnetic fields. This new tool could be used for precise sensing and in microscopy.

Microwaves, heat radiation, light and X-radiation are examples for electromagnetic waves. Many applications require to focus the electromagnetic fields to...

Im Focus: Carbon Nanotubes Turn Electrical Current into Light-emitting Quasi-particles

Strong light-matter coupling in these semiconducting tubes may hold the key to electrically pumped lasers

Light-matter quasi-particles can be generated electrically in semiconducting carbon nanotubes. Material scientists and physicists from Heidelberg University...

Im Focus: Flexible proximity sensor creates smart surfaces

Fraunhofer IPA has developed a proximity sensor made from silicone and carbon nanotubes (CNT) which detects objects and determines their position. The materials and printing process used mean that the sensor is extremely flexible, economical and can be used for large surfaces. Industry and research partners can use and further develop this innovation straight away.

At first glance, the proximity sensor appears to be nothing special: a thin, elastic layer of silicone onto which black square surfaces are printed, but these...

Im Focus: 3-D scanning with water

3-D shape acquisition using water displacement as the shape sensor for the reconstruction of complex objects

A global team of computer scientists and engineers have developed an innovative technique that more completely reconstructs challenging 3D objects. An ancient...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Clash of Realities 2017: Registration now open. International Conference at TH Köln

26.07.2017 | Event News

Closing the Sustainability Circle: Protection of Food with Biobased Materials

21.07.2017 | Event News

»We are bringing Additive Manufacturing to SMEs«

19.07.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

New 3-D imaging reveals how human cell nucleus organizes DNA and chromatin of its genome

28.07.2017 | Health and Medicine

Heavy metals in water meet their match

28.07.2017 | Power and Electrical Engineering

Oestrogen regulates pathological changes of bones via bone lining cells

28.07.2017 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>