Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Creative thinking to boost your product pipeline

31.10.2006
To ensure a steady product pipeline, small life science companies need to think creatively to maximise opportunities for collaboration and partnering, says Nick Adams, Business Development Director of biotechnology company Antisoma.

Speaking today (Tuesday 31 October) at the White Rose Bioscience Forum in York, Adams encourages companies to consider both their strengths and weaknesses, and to be open to all potential collaborations to ensure a healthy product portfolio.

“My advice is: be flexible, think out the box; what you can offer as company? Think about what you’ve got, be it technology or know how, and think hard about how you can capitalise on it. The whole company can contribute to this – talk to the research group and ask what else could we do with this technology, or put with this technology, and who could we talk to that they have contacts with? You’ll be surprised how many potential opportunities are generated from this creative brainstorming.”

This advice is based on Antisoma’s own experience. The company does not have a discovery arm; most of what it does is licensed directly from academia or from other biotechs, so it has to be creative in forging the right alliances to create a thriving product pipeline.

“Preclinically our focus is biology and we have enormous expertise in this area,” says Adams. This strength is very attractive to companies whose expertise lies on the chemistry side who have products that need biology.”

Since most cancer therapies around today are derived from plants, Antisoma was very interested to hear from a company contact about a young Australian company, Ecobiotics. Its expertise lay in its knowledge of the different chemical properties of Queensland rainforest plants at various stages of the plants’ growth. Says Adams: “Ecobiotics researchers knew how to select and synthesise the chemicals from various rainforest plants, but lacked the biological expertise, cancer models and in vitro capability.”

Antisoma and Ecobiotics now have a fruitful collaboration underpinned by a simple and transparent agreement.

“No money was exchanged up front and there are no unnecessary legal complexities. They provide us with molecules that display anti-cancer properties, we test them, and all resulting data is shared. Whilst Ecobiotics owns the IP, Antisoma has the right to select up to two molecule classes each year for development. All other test results on other molecules are owned by Ecobiotics which is free to develop the molecule further or offer it to other parties. It’s a perfect solution – they have the chemistry and we have the biology.

"I liken our networking approach to creating a spider’s web down whose strands products can come, whether developed in house, through collaborations or licensed in. The more strands you have the more chance you have of getting products to feed into your pipeline,” he says.

Jo Kelly | alfa
Further information:
http://www.whiterose.ac.uk/events/bioscienceforum

More articles from Business and Finance:

nachricht Preferential trade agreements enhance global trade at the expense of its resilience
17.02.2017 | International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA)

nachricht How Strong Brands Translate into Money
15.11.2016 | Kühne Logistics University - Wissenschaftliche Hochschule für Logistik und Unternehmensführung

All articles from Business and Finance >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Breakthrough with a chain of gold atoms

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

In the field of nanoscience, an international team of physicists with participants from Konstanz has achieved a breakthrough in understanding heat transport

Im Focus: DNA repair: a new letter in the cell alphabet

Results reveal how discoveries may be hidden in scientific “blind spots”

Cells need to repair damaged DNA in our genes to prevent the development of cancer and other diseases. Our cells therefore activate and send “repair-proteins”...

Im Focus: Dresdner scientists print tomorrow’s world

The Fraunhofer IWS Dresden and Technische Universität Dresden inaugurated their jointly operated Center for Additive Manufacturing Dresden (AMCD) with a festive ceremony on February 7, 2017. Scientists from various disciplines perform research on materials, additive manufacturing processes and innovative technologies, which build up components in a layer by layer process. This technology opens up new horizons for component design and combinations of functions. For example during fabrication, electrical conductors and sensors are already able to be additively manufactured into components. They provide information about stress conditions of a product during operation.

The 3D-printing technology, or additive manufacturing as it is often called, has long made the step out of scientific research laboratories into industrial...

Im Focus: Mimicking nature's cellular architectures via 3-D printing

Research offers new level of control over the structure of 3-D printed materials

Nature does amazing things with limited design materials. Grass, for example, can support its own weight, resist strong wind loads, and recover after being...

Im Focus: Three Magnetic States for Each Hole

Nanometer-scale magnetic perforated grids could create new possibilities for computing. Together with international colleagues, scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR) have shown how a cobalt grid can be reliably programmed at room temperature. In addition they discovered that for every hole ("antidot") three magnetic states can be configured. The results have been published in the journal "Scientific Reports".

Physicist Dr. Rantej Bali from the HZDR, together with scientists from Singapore and Australia, designed a special grid structure in a thin layer of cobalt in...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

Event News

Booth and panel discussion – The Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings at the AAAS 2017 Annual Meeting

13.02.2017 | Event News

Complex Loading versus Hidden Reserves

10.02.2017 | Event News

International Conference on Crystal Growth in Freiburg

09.02.2017 | Event News

 
Latest News

Stingless bees have their nests protected by soldiers

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

New risk factors for anxiety disorders

24.02.2017 | Life Sciences

MWC 2017: 5G Capital Berlin

24.02.2017 | Trade Fair News

VideoLinks
B2B-VideoLinks
More VideoLinks >>>