Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:


Towards highly integrated telecommunication function


Philips and DIMES found the Philips Associated Centre (PACD) at DIMES
Towards highly integrated telecommunication function

Philips has chosen TU Delft`s Institute for Micro-electronics en Submicron-technology (DIMES) to host a large research programme. The goal of this Philips Associated Centre at Dimes (PACD) is research on the integration of complete telecommunication systems into silicon technology, leading to drastic miniaturisation and reduced production costs. The six year collaboration involves an extensive financing programme for the researchers, materials and process costs, making it the largest externally funded programme in the history of DIMES.

Personal digital agendas, advanced mobile communication, wireless local and wide-area networks, ultra fast optical networks and electronic labels for identification of products in warehouses and super-markets, just some of the possibilities. The development of new communication products for a large number of users in a growing market is happening very rapidly.

Low costs are important in the production of consumer products for the masses. Large scale and cheap production of silicon chips is attained by integrating different functions onto one chip. Conditions for this integration are: miniaturisation and low energy consumption.
PACD will concentrate on the points of miniaturisation and energy consumption. Projects in the DIMES/Philips research programme vary from research of new materials in silicon processing to the design of high-frequency (RF) and millimetre-wave systems.

In the case of materials, new materials are tested, for example, for better high-frequency behaviour. These materials could make faster and smaller chips possible. In this field, Philips has been developing ‘Silicon-On-Anything’ (SOA) technology. Other projects at the PACD concerning SOA technology are aimed at three-dimensional integration and device packaging, using a special wafer processing of high-frequency circuits. Wafer-scale packaging makes it possible to run process stages parallel to each other, reducing costs and increasing production. As part of the PACD-programme agreement, Philips has given DIMES permission to use SOA technology.

The PACD will run for six years, and is, up to now, the largest externally financed programme of DIMES (which has existed for fifteen years now). Philips` choice for DIMES is a result of the already existing intensive co-operation between the two during the last few years.

Maarten van der Sanden | alphagalileo

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht Product placement: Only brands placed very prominently benefit from 3D technology
07.07.2016 | Alpen-Adria-Universität Klagenfurt

nachricht NASA Goddard network maintains communications from space to ground
02.03.2016 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Etching Microstructures with Lasers

Ultrafast lasers have introduced new possibilities in engraving ultrafine structures, and scientists are now also investigating how to use them to etch microstructures into thin glass. There are possible applications in analytics (lab on a chip) and especially in electronics and the consumer sector, where great interest has been shown.

This new method was born of a surprising phenomenon: irradiating glass in a particular way with an ultrafast laser has the effect of making the glass up to a...

Im Focus: Light-driven atomic rotations excite magnetic waves

Terahertz excitation of selected crystal vibrations leads to an effective magnetic field that drives coherent spin motion

Controlling functional properties by light is one of the grand goals in modern condensed matter physics and materials science. A new study now demonstrates how...

Im Focus: New 3-D wiring technique brings scalable quantum computers closer to reality

Researchers from the Institute for Quantum Computing (IQC) at the University of Waterloo led the development of a new extensible wiring technique capable of controlling superconducting quantum bits, representing a significant step towards to the realization of a scalable quantum computer.

"The quantum socket is a wiring method that uses three-dimensional wires based on spring-loaded pins to address individual qubits," said Jeremy Béjanin, a PhD...

Im Focus: Scientists develop a semiconductor nanocomposite material that moves in response to light

In a paper in Scientific Reports, a research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute describes a novel light-activated phenomenon that could become the basis for applications as diverse as microscopic robotic grippers and more efficient solar cells.

A research team at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) has developed a revolutionary, light-activated semiconductor nanocomposite material that can be used...

Im Focus: Diamonds aren't forever: Sandia, Harvard team create first quantum computer bridge

By forcefully embedding two silicon atoms in a diamond matrix, Sandia researchers have demonstrated for the first time on a single chip all the components needed to create a quantum bridge to link quantum computers together.

"People have already built small quantum computers," says Sandia researcher Ryan Camacho. "Maybe the first useful one won't be a single giant quantum computer...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>



Event News

#IC2S2: When Social Science meets Computer Science - GESIS will host the IC2S2 conference 2017

14.10.2016 | Event News

Agricultural Trade Developments and Potentials in Central Asia and the South Caucasus

14.10.2016 | Event News

World Health Summit – Day Three: A Call to Action

12.10.2016 | Event News

Latest News

3-D-printed structures shrink when heated

26.10.2016 | Materials Sciences

Indian roadside refuse fires produce toxic rainbow

26.10.2016 | Health and Medicine

First results of NSTX-U research operations

26.10.2016 | Physics and Astronomy

More VideoLinks >>>