Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Study to assess the effects of mobile phones on hearing nears end of first phase

26.09.2003


Scientists at the Institute of Sound and Vibration Research (ISVR) at the University of Southampton are nearing the end of the first phase of a study to assess whether the use of mobile phones has any adverse effect on the hearing of healthy young adults.


Testing the effects of mobile phones on hearing: University researchers Nathan Thomas and Mona Mahmoud



The study into Potential Adverse Effects of GSM Cellular Phones on Hearing (known by the acronym GUARD) is part of a joint European project funded by the European Commission being carried out simultaneously in several countries across Europe. The aim is to confirm that the low-intensity electromagnetic fields used by mobile phones have no measurable effect on the human hearing system.

The Southampton study involves testing the hearing of 30 healthy young adults and is led by Professor Mark Lutman, Head of Hearing at ISVR.


‘Recent media reports on the effects of mobile phones on the brain have caused anxiety among mobile phone users,’ comments Professor Lutman. ‘There is currently no evidence to suggest that the electromagnetic fields produced by these phones have any measurable effects on a person’s hearing. The most we expect is possibly a small amount of localised heating to the head while the phone is being used. However, this is the first study of its kind on humans, so we are open to new evidence.’

The experiment is being carried out in two parts. The first will involve exposing the participants to mobile phone electromagnetic fields at frequencies of 900 and 1800 MHz for a short period of time in order to investigate whether such short term exposure has any measurable effect on hearing. The second will compare hearing thresholds between groups of frequent and infrequent mobile phone users.

The exposure consists of speech at a typical conversational level delivered via a tube to one ear, plus the specified phone radiation exposure at the normal output of a popular mobile phone model at full power for ten minutes. The results of the first phase of the study will be available in December

The GUARD project brings together a European multidisciplinary research consortium with expertise in physics, engineering, biology and medicine. The research team also sought independent advice from Professor Alan Preece at the department of Medical Physics at the University of Bristol, who confirmed that exposure levels in their experiments are within national guidelines for exposure to non-ionising radiation.

Sarah Watts | alfa
Further information:
http://www.today.soton.ac.uk
http://www.experts.soton.ac.uk

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht High Number of Science Enthusiasts in Switzerland
05.02.2018 | Universität Zürich

nachricht Between filter bubbles, uneven visibility and transnationality
06.12.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

When Proteins Shake Hands

19.02.2018 | Materials Sciences

Cells communicate in a dynamic code

19.02.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>