Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Content kingmaker -- quality or webpage position?

12.06.2014

Webpage position reigns in peer recommendation of online content on sites like Reddit

In today's Information Age, it's easy get overwhelmed by online content. On YouTube alone, over 100 hours worth of video is uploaded every minute. Showcasing the most interesting content allows providers to convey a certain level of quality to its audiences and encourages users to stay on the website, consuming content and winning advertising dollars for its provider. However, this influx of information makes it difficult for both content providers and users to determine what is interesting and worth consuming.

Due to the sheer volume of submitted content, some providers such as Reddit depend on user ratings or peer recommendations to navigate and sort their most interesting content for other users. Providers depend on this collective intelligence to identify new quality content and rank it for other users, but these collective judgments via peer recommendation may be biased and inconsistent. In practice, peer recommendation often leads to "winner-take-all" and "irrational herding" behaviors that result in similar content receiving widely different numbers and types of recommendations.

In a study published in the peer-reviewed online journal PLOS ONE this week, researchers evaluated some popular peer recommendation strategies and their ability to identify interesting content. Dr. Kristina Lerman, a computer science professor at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering and a Project Leader at USC Viterbi's Information Sciences Institute, and co-author Tad Hogg, a Research Fellow at the Institute for Molecular Manufacturing in Palo Alto, CA, first determined what kind of content users prefer and then evaluated how position on a webpage affects collective judgments about content.

"Psychologists have known for decades that position bias affects perception: people pay more attention to items at the top of a list than those below them," said USC Viterbi computer science professor, Dr. Kristina Lerman. "We were surprised, however, how strongly this affected user behavior and the outcomes of recommendation."

Lerman and Hogg found that position bias accounts for consumers spending five times more attention on material that is posted near the top of a webpage. Position bias can be a potential problem for sites that rely on peer recommendation alone. For example, Reddit posts appear in order of popularity, derived from up-votes and down-votes by users, with more popular posts nearer the top of the webpage. Due to position bias, users are more likely to see, consume, and recommend already-popular content positioned near the top of the webpage, creating a run-away loop that further amplifies its popularity at the expense of potentially more interesting content farther down the webpage.

In their study, Lerman and Hogg demonstrated that ordering content by recency of recommendation rather than by aggregate popularity (total 'likes' or recommendations), generates better estimates of what users actually find interesting and would prefer to consume.

In contrast, Twitter's system of sharing and recommending content avoids the "winner-take-all" and "irrational herding" effects by presenting content in chronological order, based on the time of recommendation. Retweets, or recommendations, bring older posts back up to the top of a user's newsfeed, helping to reduce the herding effect.

"Twitter does the right thing when it pushes newly retweeted posts to the top of the followers' screens, giving them another chance to discover interesting content," said Lerman.

By influencing the peer recommendations that determine the ranking of content, position bias can create a cycle that can exclude quality content. By understanding and being aware of the factors that influence peer recommendation, providers can more effectively leverage collective judgments of consumers about what content is worthy of their time and attention.

###

This study is entitled "Leveraging position bias to improve peer recommendation," published in PLOS ONE on June 11, 2014. The research was funded in part by AFOSR (contract FA9550-10-1-0569) and by DARPA (contract W911NF-12-1-0034).

About the USC Viterbi School of Engineering

Engineering Studies began at the University of Southern California in 1905. Nearly a century later, the Viterbi School of Engineering received a naming gift in 2004 from alumnus Andrew J. Viterbi, inventor of the Viterbi algorithm now key to cell phone technology and numerous data applications. Consistently ranked among the top graduate programs in the world, the school enrolls more than 5,000 undergraduate and graduate students, taught by 174 tenured and tenure-track faculty, with 60 endowed chairs and professorships. http://viterbi.usc.edu

Megan Hazle | Eurek Alert!

Further reports about: Engineering USC Viterbi century recommendations strategies

More articles from Communications Media:

nachricht High Number of Science Enthusiasts in Switzerland
05.02.2018 | Universität Zürich

nachricht Between filter bubbles, uneven visibility and transnationality
06.12.2017 | Schweizerischer Nationalfonds SNF

All articles from Communications Media >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Attoseconds break into atomic interior

A newly developed laser technology has enabled physicists in the Laboratory for Attosecond Physics (jointly run by LMU Munich and the Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics) to generate attosecond bursts of high-energy photons of unprecedented intensity. This has made it possible to observe the interaction of multiple photons in a single such pulse with electrons in the inner orbital shell of an atom.

In order to observe the ultrafast electron motion in the inner shells of atoms with short light pulses, the pulses must not only be ultrashort, but very...

Im Focus: Good vibrations feel the force

A group of researchers led by Andrea Cavalleri at the Max Planck Institute for Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has demonstrated a new method enabling precise measurements of the interatomic forces that hold crystalline solids together. The paper Probing the Interatomic Potential of Solids by Strong-Field Nonlinear Phononics, published online in Nature, explains how a terahertz-frequency laser pulse can drive very large deformations of the crystal.

By measuring the highly unusual atomic trajectories under extreme electromagnetic transients, the MPSD group could reconstruct how rigid the atomic bonds are...

Im Focus: Developing reliable quantum computers

International research team makes important step on the path to solving certification problems

Quantum computers may one day solve algorithmic problems which even the biggest supercomputers today can’t manage. But how do you test a quantum computer to...

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Basque researchers turn light upside down

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Finnish research group discovers a new immune system regulator

23.02.2018 | Health and Medicine

Attoseconds break into atomic interior

23.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>