Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

New optimized coatings for implants reduce risk of infection

19.12.2013
Researchers at Aalto University have developed a method of selection of new surface treatment processes for orthopaedic and dental implants to reduce the risk of infection.

Implants are commonly made from metals such as titanium alloys. These materials are being made porous during processing used to prepare them for medical use.


Computer tomography of porous titanium coating made on the implant surface


Model for inverse humeral (shoulder) implant

Whereas this is important to ensure good contact between the implant and the bone, this also allows dangerous bacteria to adhere and grow both on the surface as well as inside leading to increased risk of infection.

“Our work has focused on developing an analysis of surface treatments for commercial implants which reduces risk of infection,” said Professor Michael Gasik at Aalto University. “What we wanted to do is find a way to avoid the formation of any undesirable products during the processing of the implant.”

“At the same time we needed to make sure that the bio-mechanical properties of the implant would remain intact and, even more, become better.”

A thin coating of a biomaterial called Hydroxyapatite (HAP) or bioactive glass (BAG) is typically applied to orthopaedic and other implants to alter the surface properties.

Such coatings improve the body ability to recognize a foreign object in a more friendly way and promote implant integration into surrounding tissues. During the heat treatment process, excessive stresses can cause premature cracking and removal of the coating layer. This can lead to the development of unsuitable compounds and increase the risk of infection.

“Normally, implants require a certain level of porosity and elasticity to function properly,” added Professor Gasik. “The challenge for us was to ensure full functionality of the implant while maintaining sufficient density of the coating during the heat treatment process.” “We have proven that by adding a certain amount of another compound called beta-tricalcium phosphate (ß-TCP) such stresses are reduced and therefore preserves the biomaterial coating better.” Thus minimizing the risk of coating destruction and bacterial adhesion, and improving cell proliferation, allows the implant surface to achieve its function in an optimal way.

This research is significant in the battle against the spread of drug resistant bacteria. An estimated 10-15% of post-implant complications are caused by bacterial infections. Post-operative diseases are becoming more challenging and developing new treatments that are resistant to infection are crucial. In response to this research, Aalto University and partner manufacturers have already started developing new experimental devices for advanced testing of biomaterials at the conditions most close to life. Besides proving developed technology, it will allow high-throughput screening of the biomaterials with substantially better properties.

The research was conducted at Aalto University and supported by Tekes, the Finnish national innovation agency, and by the EU FP6 project “Meddelcoat”.

More information:
Professor Michael Gasik
Aalto University, School of Chemical Technology
michael.gasik@aalto.fi
Tel. +358 50 5609511
The articles:
Michael Gasik, Anu Keski-Honkola, Yevgen Bilotsky, Michael Friman: DEVELOPMENT AND OPTIMIZATION OF HYDROXYAPATITE - ß-TCP FUNCTIONALLY GRADATED BIOMATERIAL. Journal of the Mechanical Behavior of Biomedical Materials (2013), dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jmbbm.2013.11.017

Michael Gasik, Lieve Van Mellaert, Dorothée Pierron, Annabel Braem, Dorien Hofmans, Evelien De Waelheyns, Jozef Anné, Marie-Françoise Harmand, Jozef Vleugels. REDUCTION OF BIOFILM INFECTION RISKS AND PROMOTION OF OSTEOINTEGRATION FOR OPTIMIZED SURFACES OF TITANIUM IMPLANTS. Advanced Healthcare Materials, 1, No. 1 (2012), 117–127.

Aalto University, Finland is a new multidisciplinary science and art community in the fields of science, economics, and art and design. The University is founded on Finnish strengths, and its goal is to develop as a unique entity to become one of the world's top universities. Aalto University's cornerstones are its strengths in education and research. At the new University, there are 20,000 basic degree and graduate students as well as a staff of 5,000 of which 370 are professors.

Jenni Jeskanen
Communications
Aalto University
+358 50 372 7062

Jenni Jeskanen | Aalto University
Further information:
http://www.aalto.fi

More articles from Materials Sciences:

nachricht Hidden talents: Converting heat into electricity with pencil and paper
20.02.2018 | Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie

nachricht Contacting the molecular world through graphene nanoribbons
19.02.2018 | Elhuyar Fundazioa

All articles from Materials Sciences >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: In best circles: First integrated circuit from self-assembled polymer

For the first time, a team of researchers at the Max-Planck Institute (MPI) for Polymer Research in Mainz, Germany, has succeeded in making an integrated circuit (IC) from just a monolayer of a semiconducting polymer via a bottom-up, self-assembly approach.

In the self-assembly process, the semiconducting polymer arranges itself into an ordered monolayer in a transistor. The transistors are binary switches used...

Im Focus: Demonstration of a single molecule piezoelectric effect

Breakthrough provides a new concept of the design of molecular motors, sensors and electricity generators at nanoscale

Researchers from the Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the CAS (IOCB Prague), Institute of Physics of the CAS (IP CAS) and Palacký University...

Im Focus: Hybrid optics bring color imaging using ultrathin metalenses into focus

For photographers and scientists, lenses are lifesavers. They reflect and refract light, making possible the imaging systems that drive discovery through the microscope and preserve history through cameras.

But today's glass-based lenses are bulky and resist miniaturization. Next-generation technologies, such as ultrathin cameras or tiny microscopes, require...

Im Focus: Stem cell divisions in the adult brain seen for the first time

Scientists from the University of Zurich have succeeded for the first time in tracking individual stem cells and their neuronal progeny over months within the intact adult brain. This study sheds light on how new neurons are produced throughout life.

The generation of new nerve cells was once thought to taper off at the end of embryonic development. However, recent research has shown that the adult brain...

Im Focus: Interference as a new method for cooling quantum devices

Theoretical physicists propose to use negative interference to control heat flow in quantum devices. Study published in Physical Review Letters

Quantum computer parts are sensitive and need to be cooled to very low temperatures. Their tiny size makes them particularly susceptible to a temperature...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

2nd International Conference on High Temperature Shape Memory Alloys (HTSMAs)

15.02.2018 | Event News

Aachen DC Grid Summit 2018

13.02.2018 | Event News

How Global Climate Policy Can Learn from the Energy Transition

12.02.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

'Lipid asymmetry' plays key role in activating immune cells

20.02.2018 | Life Sciences

MRI technique differentiates benign breast lesions from malignancies

20.02.2018 | Medical Engineering

Major discovery in controlling quantum states of single atoms

20.02.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>