Latest News

Computers learn how to create drugs of the future

The key role of computer technology in the fine-tuning of drug development and design will be considered by Professor Stephen Muggleton of Imperial College, London in his inaugural lecture, Models of Mind and Models of Body, today.

The new Professor of Bioinformatics in the Department of Computing will focus on how machine learning and logic programming can reduce the high costs of drug development in the pharmaceutical industry.

The pharmaceutical industry is increasingly overwhelm

Hubble`s Advanced Camera unveils a panoramic new view of the Universe

Jubilant astronomers today unveiled humankind`s most spectacular views of the Universe as captured by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope`s new Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS). They also reported that Hubble is operating superbly since the March servicing mission and are looking forward to more pictures from the newly revived NICMOS camera.

“The ACS is opening a wide new window onto the Universe. These are among the best images of the distant Universe humans have ever seen,” says Johns Hop

Xenon outs WIMPs

Dark-matter detector could pin down the Universe’s missing mass.

Researchers in London are building a cheap dark-matter detector that should be able to spot the exotic particles called WIMPs that are suspected of hiding most of the Universe’s missing mass 1 .

A prototype of the detector has just shown, for the first time, that it can spot something as close to a WIMP as it’s possible to produce in the lab.

WIMP stands for ’weakly interacting massiv

Here come the Ratbots

Desire drives remote-controlled rodents.

Remote-controlled rats could soon be detecting earthquake survivors or leading bomb-disposal teams to buried land mines.

Signals from a laptop up to 500 metres away make the rats run, climb, jump and even cross brightly lit open spaces, contrary to their instincts. The rodents carry a backpack containing a radio receiver and a power source that transmits the signals into their brains through electrical probes the breadth of a hair.

LCD paint licked

Walls and curtains could sport liquid-crystal digital displays.

Homes of the future could change their wallpaper from cream to cornflower blue at the touch of a button, says Dirk Broer. His team has developed paint-on liquid crystal displays (LCDs) that offer the technology.

Liquid crystals are peculiar liquids: their molecules spontaneously line up, rather than being randomly orientated as in a normal liquid. Passing a voltage across the molecules switches their alignment, b

Was Frankenstein a Scotsman?

An article in the May issue of Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine suggests that much of the medical inspiration for Mary Shelley’s legendary novel Frankenstein came not from central Europe, but from a retired Scots physician living in Windsor. Christopher Goulding, a postgraduate student at the University of Newcastle upon Tyne, bases his claims on his PhD research into the scientific interests of the novelist’s husband, the poet Percy Shelley.

Most criticism of Mary Shelley’s much-in

Page
1 17,569 17,570 17,571 17,572 17,573 17,675

Physics and Astronomy

Black hole at center of the Milky Way resembles a football

Researchers revealed that the black hole’s spinning speed could provide an ‘incredibly powerful kick’ to surrounding matter. The supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way is spinning…

The Radcliffe Wave is waving

Astronomers report oscillation of our giant, gaseous neighbor. A few years ago, astronomers uncovered one of the Milky Way’s greatest secrets:  an enormous, wave-shaped chain of gaseous clouds in our…

A new design for quantum computers

Creating a quantum computer powerful enough to tackle problems we cannot solve with current computers remains a big challenge for quantum physicists. A well-functioning quantum simulator – a specific type…

Life Sciences and Chemistry

Developing novel strategies against tuberculosis and malaria

Saarbrücken-based research project on new drugs against infectious diseases receives support from Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Tuberculosis and malaria are among the deadliest infectious diseases worldwide and are increasingly…

TB vaccine shrinks liver cancer tumors in mice

Century-old tuberculosis vaccine extends survival of mice with hard-to-treat liver cancer. A UC Davis Health study found that a single dose of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the vaccine for tuberculosis (TB),…

Small ribonucleic acid with a big impact

Researchers from Jena uncover new mechanism for regulating cell division in the bacterial pathogen Klebsiella. Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the most common and most dangerous bacterial pathogens impacting humans,…

Materials Sciences

Sodium-ion batteries: How doping works

Sodium-ion batteries still have a number of weaknesses that could be remedied by optimising the battery materials. One possibility is to dope the cathode material with foreign elements. A team…

Environmentally friendly alternative to PFAS-based coatings

The Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP) in Greifswald, Germany has developed a new method for the production of ultra-hydrophobic organosilicon polymer coatings. These coatings are an alternative…

Innovative coating prevents limescale formation

Hot water tanks, washing machines, kettles: limescale forms in every domestic appliance that comes into contact with (hot) water – especially in areas where the water is hard, meaning high…

Information Technology

Human-AI coworking

New system combines human, artificial intelligence to improve experimentation. Though artificial intelligence decreases human error in experimentation, human experts outperform AI when identifying causation or working with small data sets….

Security vulnerabilities of browser extensions in the Chrome Web Store

Millions of users use browser extensions on a daily basis, for example, to block advertisements on websites. But is the use of extensions from third-party providers at all secure? CISPA…

1,000 atomic qubits and rising

A new record for atom-based quantum computers. Making quantum systems more scalable is one of the key requirements for the further development of quantum computers because the advantages they offer…