Latest News

Ultracold Atoms Form Long-Lasting Waves

At sufficiently cold temperatures, the atoms in a gas can form what is known as a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC), losing their individual identities and merging into a single quantum state. The phenomenon has fascinated physicists ever since gaseous BECs were created in the laboratory in 1995 (although the possiblity was first postulated some 70 years earlier), and a flurry of recent research has uncovered all kinds of remarkable condensate properties. Now researchers writing in the journal Nature ha

A round home robot aids the elderly

Rollo, the home robot, has been developed by the Laboratories of Automation Technology, Information and Computer Systems in Automation and Control Engineering of the Helsinki University of Technology for seven years and is presently being adapted for home care and independent living at home. Rollo is part of the “Turning Well-Being Technology into a Success Story” – (iWELL) technology programme of the National Technology Agency Tekes.

“The reason why we arrived at a ball-shaped solution was

Mobile phones and the inner ear

A new technique has been developed by researchers in the Netherlands to look at the effect of radiation from mobile phones on complex structures like the inner ear and eye. The technique called `quasistatic zooming` will help researchers calculate the amount of radiation from mobile phones absorbed by human tissue on scales of less than one millimetre. The work is published today in the Institute of Physics journal, Physics in Medicine and Biology.

Concern about the potentially hazardous e

Blow for hair link to breast cancer

The promising link between certain properties in human hair which could have potentially helped in diagnosis of breast cancer is “dubious” according to research published today in the Institute of Physics journal, Physics in Medicine and Biology. Dr Mark Sutton of the McGill University in Canada and colleagues have found no clear association between peaks seen in what is known as small angle x-ray scattering and the risk of breast cancer, as had been reported previously in the journal Nature (James e

University of Ulster Researcher Discovers Crocs That Time Forgot

A University of Ulster researcher has discovered a new population of cave dwelling crocodiles, never before seen outside their Saharan habitat.

PhD student Tara Shine discovered the cave dwelling crocodiles while living in the remote African country of Mauritania as part of a two and a half year volunteer project.

Previously unknown, except by local tribespeople, the crocodiles live in burrows and caves throughout the dry season and periods of drought – a phenomenon never

New light detector

A novel prototype light meter has been developed by researchers in New York. Published today in the Institute of Physics journal, Measurement Science and Technology, this new retinal flux density meter will provide an affordable tool for measuring light at all levels and might ultimately lead to new standards to improve both energy efficiency and safety at night.

The retina in the eye detects light using cells called rods and cones. At high light levels, such as in daylight, the cones detec

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Physics and Astronomy

Black hole at center of the Milky Way resembles a football

Researchers revealed that the black hole’s spinning speed could provide an ‘incredibly powerful kick’ to surrounding matter. The supermassive black hole in the center of the Milky Way is spinning…

The Radcliffe Wave is waving

Astronomers report oscillation of our giant, gaseous neighbor. A few years ago, astronomers uncovered one of the Milky Way’s greatest secrets:  an enormous, wave-shaped chain of gaseous clouds in our…

A new design for quantum computers

Creating a quantum computer powerful enough to tackle problems we cannot solve with current computers remains a big challenge for quantum physicists. A well-functioning quantum simulator – a specific type…

Life Sciences and Chemistry

Developing novel strategies against tuberculosis and malaria

Saarbrücken-based research project on new drugs against infectious diseases receives support from Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Tuberculosis and malaria are among the deadliest infectious diseases worldwide and are increasingly…

TB vaccine shrinks liver cancer tumors in mice

Century-old tuberculosis vaccine extends survival of mice with hard-to-treat liver cancer. A UC Davis Health study found that a single dose of Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), the vaccine for tuberculosis (TB),…

Small ribonucleic acid with a big impact

Researchers from Jena uncover new mechanism for regulating cell division in the bacterial pathogen Klebsiella. Klebsiella pneumoniae is one of the most common and most dangerous bacterial pathogens impacting humans,…

Materials Sciences

Sodium-ion batteries: How doping works

Sodium-ion batteries still have a number of weaknesses that could be remedied by optimising the battery materials. One possibility is to dope the cathode material with foreign elements. A team…

Environmentally friendly alternative to PFAS-based coatings

The Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology (INP) in Greifswald, Germany has developed a new method for the production of ultra-hydrophobic organosilicon polymer coatings. These coatings are an alternative…

Innovative coating prevents limescale formation

Hot water tanks, washing machines, kettles: limescale forms in every domestic appliance that comes into contact with (hot) water – especially in areas where the water is hard, meaning high…

Information Technology

Human-AI coworking

New system combines human, artificial intelligence to improve experimentation. Though artificial intelligence decreases human error in experimentation, human experts outperform AI when identifying causation or working with small data sets….

Security vulnerabilities of browser extensions in the Chrome Web Store

Millions of users use browser extensions on a daily basis, for example, to block advertisements on websites. But is the use of extensions from third-party providers at all secure? CISPA…

1,000 atomic qubits and rising

A new record for atom-based quantum computers. Making quantum systems more scalable is one of the key requirements for the further development of quantum computers because the advantages they offer…