Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Cebit 2017: Alumni of Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science in Demand all over the World

16.03.2017

Whether they are developing computational procedures for higher-quality medication or planning future space missions – young scientists of Saarland University are working on a variety of research projects. Students are supported and supervised by the Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science, which offers a well-structured graduate program for candidates pursuing a PhD. The Graduate School provides scholarships, and also allows exceptionally talented students to start working on their doctorate directly from a Bachelor's degree level onwards. For further information, visit the Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science at the Cebit computer fair at Stand E28, Hall 6.

US entrepreneur Elon Musk is famous all over the world. His name is tied to the online payment system PayPal, as well as the electric car manufacturer Tesla, and he has just made global news with his plans to let two space tourists orbit the moon, with the help of his space travel enterprise SpaceX, as soon as next year.


Gilles Nies and his supervisor Holger Hermanns with the satellite whose missions they are securing with new computational models.

Oliver Dietze

“I would never have dreamed that I would meet this stellar investor myself one day, at an international astronaut convention in Mexico. Nor would I have dreamed that I might be working on a procedure that could revolutionize space missions,” says Gilles Nies, a doctoral student at Saarland University who is supported by the Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science.

Numerous young researchers from all over the world apply for one of the 30 new openings offered each year. The Graduate School program is divided into two phases: During the preparatory phase, the students attend lectures on a wide range of computer science topics, while gaining deeper knowledge and insight into their field of research.

All doctoral students are assigned an academic mentor, and receive a monthly grant of at least 800 Euros from the Graduate School, so that they can concentrate entirely on their academic work. “Depending on their prior knowledge, this phase can be customized to meet the needs and interests of the individual students,” says Professor Andreas Zeller, responsible for admissions at the Saarbrücken Graduate School.

"Our doctoral students are free to familiarize themselves with various areas of research.” Students can do their research either at Saarland University, or at one of the renowned research institutes that have settled nearby on the Saarland Informatics Campus.

Apart from the two Max Planck Institutes for Computer Science and for Software Systems, these include the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence (DFKI), the Intel Visual Computing Institute, the Cluster of Excellence “Multimodal Computing and Interaction”, the Center for Bioinformatics, and the budding Center for IT Security, CISPA. This means that students can choose between 75 different working groups, covering fields such as algorithms and data structures, computational biology and embedded systems, cybersecurity and machine learning.

The Graduate School continues to support the doctoral candidates during the subsequent dissertation phase. An additional advantage: In Saarbrücken, not just the supervising professor is responsible for a dissertation project, but the entire Computer Science department. Some 75 professors and researchers are there to support grad students with their research.

“With our offer, we are in fact competing with elite universities like Stanford and Cambridge,” says Zeller. Saarbrücken Graduate School alumni have made it into in a whole range of research institutions worldwide after graduating. “Some of our former PhD students have stayed in research, at the Swiss Institute of Technology ETH in Zürich for example, while others work for technology companies like Google or Facebook. Others yet have realized their own ideas and started a business. Here, the local IT Incubator provides additional advice and support as a technology transfer center for founders,” Zeller reports.

Gilles Nies is not thinking about the time after graduation just yet. At the moment, he is still enjoying his research in the context of a space mission: “It’s still exciting and fascinating to me. Space is somewhat intangible, and that makes it strangely attractive.”

Background: Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science
Apart from the Computer Science department at Saarland University, the institutions participating in the Graduate School are the two Max Planck Institutes for Informatics and for Software Systems, the Center for IT Security, Privacy and Accountability CISPA, the German Research Center for Artificial Intelligence DFKI, and the Intel Visual Computing Institute. Since 2007, the Graduate School has been funded by the Initiative of Excellence of the German federal and national governments, presently in its second round.

Further Inquiries:
Dr Michelle Carnell
Managing Director
Saarbrücken Graduate School of Computer Science
Phone: +49 681 302-5523
E-Mail: carnell@cs.uni-saarland.de

Prof. Dr. Andreas Zeller
Phone: +49 681 302-70971
E-Mail: zeller@cs.uni-sb.de

Editor:
Gordon Bolduan
Science Communication
Competence Center Computer Science Saarland
Phone: +49 681 302-70741
E-Mail: bolduan@mmci.uni-saarland.de

Weitere Informationen:

http://gradschool.cs.uni-saarland.de

Thorsten Mohr | Universität des Saarlandes

More articles from Trade Fair News:

nachricht Make more with your 3D printers: from smooth surfaces to complex patterns
26.07.2019 | Inria Nancy-Grand Est

nachricht Fraunhofer IPT presents platform for automated precision assembly of polarized optical fibers
02.07.2019 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Produktionstechnologie IPT

All articles from Trade Fair News >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots

Soft robots have a distinct advantage over their rigid forebears: they can adapt to complex environments, handle fragile objects and interact safely with humans. Made from silicone, rubber or other stretchable polymers, they are ideal for use in rehabilitation exoskeletons and robotic clothing. Soft bio-inspired robots could one day be deployed to explore remote or dangerous environments.

Most soft robots are actuated by rigid, noisy pumps that push fluids into the machines' moving parts. Because they are connected to these bulky pumps by tubes,...

Im Focus: Vehicle Emissions: New sensor technology to improve air quality in cities

Researchers at TU Graz are working together with European partners on new possibilities of measuring vehicle emissions.

Today, air pollution is one of the biggest challenges facing European cities. As part of the Horizon 2020 research project CARES (City Air Remote Emission...

Im Focus: Self healing robots that "feel pain"

Over the next three years, researchers from the Vrije Universiteit Brussel, University of Cambridge, École Supérieure de Physique et de Chimie Industrielles de la ville de Paris (ESPCI-Paris) and Empa will be working together with the Dutch Polymer manufacturer SupraPolix on the next generation of robots: (soft) robots that ‘feel pain’ and heal themselves. The partners can count on 3 million Euro in support from the European Commission.

Soon robots will not only be found in factories and laboratories, but will be assisting us in our immediate environment. They will help us in the household, to...

Im Focus: Scientists create the world's thinnest gold

Scientists at the University of Leeds have created a new form of gold which is just two atoms thick - the thinnest unsupported gold ever created.

The researchers measured the thickness of the gold to be 0.47 nanometres - that is one million times thinner than a human finger nail. The material is regarded...

Im Focus: Study on attosecond timescale casts new light on electron dynamics in transition metals

An international team of scientists involving the Max Planck Institute for the Structure and Dynamics of Matter (MPSD) in Hamburg has unraveled the light-induced electron-localization dynamics in transition metals at the attosecond timescale. The team investigated for the first time the many-body electron dynamics in transition metals before thermalization sets in. Their work has now appeared in Nature Physics.

The researchers from ETH Zurich (Switzerland), the MPSD (Germany), the Center for Computational Sciences of University of Tsukuba (Japan) and the Center for...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

The power of thought – the key to success: CYBATHLON BCI Series 2019

16.08.2019 | Event News

4th Hybrid Materials and Structures 2020 28 - 29 April 2020, Karlsruhe, Germany

14.08.2019 | Event News

What will the digital city of the future look like? City Science Summit on 1st and 2nd October 2019 in Hamburg

12.08.2019 | Event News

 
Latest News

A laser for penetrating waves

19.08.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

Unraveling the stripe order mystery

19.08.2019 | Physics and Astronomy

From the tiny testes of flies, new insight into how genes arise

19.08.2019 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>