Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Saturn’s radio broadcasters mapped in 3-d for the first time

23.09.2008
Observations from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft have been used to build, for the first time, a 3-D picture of the sources of intense radio emissions in Saturn’s magnetic field, known as the Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR).

The results will be presented by Dr Baptist Cecconi, of LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, at the European Planetary Science Congress on Tuesday 23rd September.

The SKR radio emissions are generated by high-energy electrons spiralling around magnetic field lines threaded through Saturn’s auroras. Previous Cassini observations have shown that the SKR is closely correlated with the intensity of Saturn’s UV aurora and the pressure of the solar wind.

The measurements were made using Cassini’s Radio and Plasma Wave Science (RPWS) experiment.

“The animation shows radio sources clustered around curving magnetic field lines. Because the radio signals are beamed out from the source in a cone-shape, we can only detect the sources as Cassini flies through the cone. When Cassini flies at high altitudes over the ring planes, we see the sources clearly clustered around one or two field lines. However, at low latitudes we get more refraction and so the sources appear to be scattered,” said Dr Cecconi.

The model found that the active magnetic field lines could be traced back to near-polar latitudes degrees in both the northern and southern hemisphere. This matches well with the location of Saturn’s UV aurora.

“For the purposes of the model, we’ve imagined a screen that cuts through the middle of Saturn, set up at right-angles to the line between Cassini and the centre of the planet. We’ve mapped the footprints of the radio sources projected onto the screen, which tilts as Cassini moves along its orbital path and its orientation with respect to Saturn changes. We’ve also traced the footprints of the magnetic field lines back to the cloud tops of Saturn,” said Dr Cecconi.

Although there were some minor differences between emissions in the northern and southern hemispheres, the emissions were strongest in the western part of Saturn’s sunlit hemisphere. This area corresponds to a region of Saturn’s magnetopause where electrons are thought to be accelerated by the interaction of the solar wind and Saturn’s magnetic field.

The observations were made over a 24-hour period during Cassini’s flyby of Saturn on 25-26th September 2006. This flyby was chosen because Cassini would approach from the southern hemisphere and swoop out from the northern hemisphere, allowing the instruments to take measurements from about 30 degrees below to about 30 degrees above the equatorial plane.

Anita Heward | alfa
Further information:
http://www.europlanet-eu.org

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht Data storage using individual molecules
17.12.2018 | Universität Basel

nachricht Formed to Meet Customers’ Needs – New Laser Beams for Glass Processing
17.12.2018 | Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik ILT

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal ‘small’, the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.

Around the world, researchers are attempting to shrink data storage devices to achieve as large a storage capacity in as small a space as possible. In almost...

Im Focus: Data use draining your battery? Tiny device to speed up memory while also saving power

The more objects we make "smart," from watches to entire buildings, the greater the need for these devices to store and retrieve massive amounts of data quickly without consuming too much power.

Millions of new memory cells could be part of a computer chip and provide that speed and energy savings, thanks to the discovery of a previously unobserved...

Im Focus: An energy-efficient way to stay warm: Sew high-tech heating patches to your clothes

Personal patches could reduce energy waste in buildings, Rutgers-led study says

What if, instead of turning up the thermostat, you could warm up with high-tech, flexible patches sewn into your clothes - while significantly reducing your...

Im Focus: Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth – this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel’s Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in “Cell Reports”, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.

The widely used anti-diabetes drug metformin not only reduces blood sugar but also has an anti-cancer effect. However, the metformin dose commonly used in the...

Im Focus: New Foldable Drone Flies through Narrow Holes in Rescue Missions

A research team from the University of Zurich has developed a new drone that can retract its propeller arms in flight and make itself small to fit through narrow gaps and holes. This is particularly useful when searching for victims of natural disasters.

Inspecting a damaged building after an earthquake or during a fire is exactly the kind of job that human rescuers would like drones to do for them. A flying...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

ICTM Conference 2019: Digitization emerges as an engineering trend for turbomachinery construction

12.12.2018 | Event News

New Plastics Economy Investor Forum - Meeting Point for Innovations

10.12.2018 | Event News

EGU 2019 meeting: Media registration now open

06.12.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Formed to Meet Customers’ Needs – New Laser Beams for Glass Processing

17.12.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Preserving soil quality in the long term

17.12.2018 | Architecture and Construction

New RNA sequencing strategy provides insight into microbiomes

17.12.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>