Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

What Does A Waterfall Sound Like In Space?

30.06.2004


The answer to this fascinating question may be found on Titan, Saturn’s largest moon. University of Southampton scientist Professor Tim Leighton has speculated how the sound of splashing liquid in deep space might differ to that heard on Earth - and it’s possible that his theory could be proved later this year by NASA’s Cassini mission to Saturn. In the meantime, he has recreated the sound he believes it makes and put it on the Internet.

On Thursday 1 July 2004, NASA’s Cassini space craft will go into orbit around Saturn where it will study the planet, its moons and rings for four years. However, in Professor Leighton’s view, possibly the most interesting aspect of the Cassini mission, is the European Space Agency’s probe Huygens, which will study Titan. After a seven-year journey strapped to the side of Cassini, the probe will separate from it on Christmas Day 2004 and coast for 20 days before parachuting through the thick atmosphere to become the first man-made object to land on the moon of another planet on 14 January 2005.

Titan’s thick smog has prevented earlier spacecraft photographing its surface, but there are suggestions that the moon may be home to seas and streams made, not of water, but of liquid ethane. The main focus of Huygens’ mission is sampling the smog-laden atmosphere, but three minutes of battery time will be used for investigations immediately after landing. Although the probe’s microphone is on board primarily to monitor atmospheric buffering, Professor Leighton of the University’s Institute for Sound and Vibration Research, has suggested that, were the microphone to detect a splash-down as opposed to a crunch on landing, the question of what a splash in space might sound like would be answered.



Professor Leighton, who has speculated for several years on sounds in space, explains: ’I began asking whether the noise of splashes which is so familiar to us on Earth would be recognisable in a sea of liquid ethane at a temperature of 180 degrees below zero. NASA’s specially-commissioned painting of a waterfall - actually a methane fall - on Titan inspired me to attempt to predict how it would sound. I set up the equations and measured the sound of a small waterfall in nearby Romsey. My colleague Dr Paul White then processed the signal to obtain what we believe would be the sound of a methane fall on Titan.

’Given that the last decade has seen an explosion in the amount we can learn about the oceans simply by listening to them, from storms to seabed properties to coastal erosion, acoustics represent a potentially exciting and comparatively low-cost method of space exploration.’

Professor Leighton outlines his ideas for the role of acoustics in space exploration in an article entitled ’The Sound of Titan’ to be published in the July/August edition of Acoustics Bulletin. The sound of the methane fall as calculated by Professor Leighton and Dr Paul White can be heard at www.isvr.soton.ac.uk/fdag/uaua.htm

Sarah Watts | alfa
Further information:
http://www.soton.ac.uk
http://www.isvr.soton.ac.uk

More articles from Physics and Astronomy:

nachricht UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion
16.11.2018 | University of New Hampshire

nachricht NASA keeps watch over space explosions
16.11.2018 | NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

All articles from Physics and Astronomy >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

European Space Talks: Weltraumschrott – eine Gefahr für die Gesellschaft?

23.10.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'

16.11.2018 | Health and Medicine

Good preparation is half the digestion

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

Microscope measures muscle weakness

16.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>