Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Southampton spin-out scoops major healthcare prize for revolutionary liver disease treatments

14.11.2005


Southampton-based company iQur has scooped the 2005 Medical Futures Department of Health Award for Best National Healthcare Innovation for its Hepatitis C diagnostic service, that can revolutionise the cost-effectiveness of treatment for Hepatitis C. iQur, formerly named HepCgen Limited, spun out from the University of Southampton in 2003.



The Medical Futures Innovations Awards are often referred to as the ‘Oscars of Healthcare’. iQur was presented with the Award for its research into the detection, treatment and monitoring of Hepatitis C and other liver diseases at the awards ceremony in London.

Accepting the Award from supermodel Caprice, Professor William Rosenberg, iQur’s founding Chief Scientific Officer and Professor of Hepatology at the University of Southampton, said: ‘This award is testament to the importance and success of our diagnostic services. iQur is the first Southampton-based company to be recognised at this level and we achieved this as a result of our expert team and their tremendous dedication to develop better care for the increasing threat of Hepatitis C across the globe. iQur’s strategies enable therapies to be tailored to the individual patient – potentially reducing treatment time and side effects, saving the NHS millions of pounds in clinical and pharmaceutical expenses. Following this innovation will be our simple blood test to reduce the requirement of serial liver biopsy across Europe, then the introduction of better treatment for Hepatitis C’


Speaking on behalf of the University of Southampton, Dr Tony Raven, Director of its Centre for Enterprise and Innovation (CEI) said, ‘Winning this very prestigious and hotly contested award is a fitting tribute to the work of Professor Rosenberg and his scientific team at iQur Limited.’ Earlier this year two other University of Southampton spin-out companies, SPI Lasers and OHM, were finalists in the Royal Academy of Engineering’s prestigious MacRobert Award, which recognises the successful development of innovative ideas in engineering. ‘The recognition our spin-out companies are receiving from these awards reflects the real commercial significance of our research and technology,’ he added.

As well as recognition within the medical community, iQur has also attracted positive attention from the investment community, and has successfully raised further investment of £2.6 million in an oversubscribed funding round. The funding will be used to establish the company’s Diagnostic Services business, the iQur® Speciality Pharmaceutical distribution division and grow various therapeutic in-licensing agreements.

Commenting on the investment and Award, David Norwood, Board Director and CEO of IP2IPO, a major investor in iQur, said: ‘UK universities are originators of some of the best novel intellectual property in the world, and the University of Southampton and the progress of the iQur team to deliver innovation to the global problem of liver disease, specifically, Hepatitis C, is an inspiration to all our portfolio companies, and fully reflective of our mission. iQur’s progress is underlined by the success of this financing round.’

In addition, iQur has also extended its focus and pipeline beyond Hepatitis C into liver fibrosis and secured a licensing deal with The University of Southampton. Liver fibrosis is the result of fatty liver disease, obesity, hepatitis, alcoholic liver disease and others. Over the last 20 years, the University has achieved an international reputation for its study of the pathology of fibrosis, cirrhosis, then cancer of the liver.

Commenting on these significant announcements, Paul Colford, CEO, said: ‘I am delighted that iQur’s ground breaking research into the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of major liver diseases has been recognised on such a wide range of fronts, by the Department of Health, the investment community and the University, and underlines our company’s goal to become THE liver disease company.’

Sarah Watts | alfa
Further information:
http://www.soton.ac.uk

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Study tracks inner workings of the brain with new biosensor
16.08.2018 | Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn

nachricht Foods of the future
15.08.2018 | Georg-August-Universität Göttingen

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: Color effects from transparent 3D-printed nanostructures

New design tool automatically creates nanostructure 3D-print templates for user-given colors
Scientists present work at prestigious SIGGRAPH conference

Most of the objects we see are colored by pigments, but using pigments has disadvantages: such colors can fade, industrial pigments are often toxic, and...

Im Focus: Unraveling the nature of 'whistlers' from space in the lab

A new study sheds light on how ultralow frequency radio waves and plasmas interact

Scientists at the University of California, Los Angeles present new research on a curious cosmic phenomenon known as "whistlers" -- very low frequency packets...

Im Focus: New interactive machine learning tool makes car designs more aerodynamic

Scientists develop first tool to use machine learning methods to compute flow around interactively designable 3D objects. Tool will be presented at this year’s prestigious SIGGRAPH conference.

When engineers or designers want to test the aerodynamic properties of the newly designed shape of a car, airplane, or other object, they would normally model...

Im Focus: Robots as 'pump attendants': TU Graz develops robot-controlled rapid charging system for e-vehicles

Researchers from TU Graz and their industry partners have unveiled a world first: the prototype of a robot-controlled, high-speed combined charging system (CCS) for electric vehicles that enables series charging of cars in various parking positions.

Global demand for electric vehicles is forecast to rise sharply: by 2025, the number of new vehicle registrations is expected to reach 25 million per year....

Im Focus: The “TRiC” to folding actin

Proteins must be folded correctly to fulfill their molecular functions in cells. Molecular assistants called chaperones help proteins exploit their inbuilt folding potential and reach the correct three-dimensional structure. Researchers at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) have demonstrated that actin, the most abundant protein in higher developed cells, does not have the inbuilt potential to fold and instead requires special assistance to fold into its active state. The chaperone TRiC uses a previously undescribed mechanism to perform actin folding. The study was recently published in the journal Cell.

Actin is the most abundant protein in highly developed cells and has diverse functions in processes like cell stabilization, cell division and muscle...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

LaserForum 2018 deals with 3D production of components

17.08.2018 | Event News

Within reach of the Universe

08.08.2018 | Event News

A journey through the history of microscopy – new exhibition opens at the MDC

27.07.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

Smallest transistor worldwide switches current with a single atom in solid electrolyte

17.08.2018 | Physics and Astronomy

Robots as Tools and Partners in Rehabilitation

17.08.2018 | Information Technology

Climate Impact Research in Hannover: Small Plants against Large Waves

17.08.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>