Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Multiple views from CT scans may improve diagnosis

17.05.2005


Routinely reformatting computed tomography (CT) scans to view organs from several different directions may help radiologists improve diagnosis, according to new research from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center. The results are being presented this week at the American Roentgen Ray Society meeting in New Orleans, La.



"You can see things in one view that you might miss in another," said Craig Barnes, M.D., section head of pediatric radiology at Wake Forest Baptist’s Brenner Children’s Hospital. "It costs no more as relates to scan time or radiation exposure, and we believe it provides added value in diagnosis."

CT scans use X-rays, radiation detectors and computers to produce images or "slices" through the body. In most cases, the images are in the axial plane – a view looking down through the body. But new faster multidetector CT scanners that can capture eight or more slices at once opened the door to alternate views. With proper processing, these other views are of similar quality to the original axial images.


In some cases, physicians reformat the data to view an organ from the front. Called the coronal plane, this is similar to the way an X-ray looks. Another view, the sagittal plane, provides a view from the side.

"These alternate views are sometimes used to make it easier to see organs such as the spleen and liver, or vascular structures such as the aorta," said Barnes. "We wanted to see if there was an advantage to using the alternate views on a routine basis."

For the past two years, Wake Forest Baptist has used all three views on abdominal and chest CT scans of pediatric patients. For their prospective study, they reviewed 44 chest CT scans and 40 abdominal CT scans and compared reading time and accuracy of the views.

Images in the sagittal and coronal planes, which present views that are similar to a physical exam, could be read more quickly because fewer images are required, Barnes said. Coronal images required an average of 54 images per patient, compared to 90 for axial images. "Time efficiency was improved and diagnostic accuracy was maintained," said Barnes. "As radiologists become more familiar with reading in the alternate views, this approach may prove beneficial as a replacement, or in addition to, axial images."

He said that when used together, multiple planes can increase diagnostic accuracy. For example, the multiple views allowed the physicians to diagnose a metastatic tumor that might otherwise be confused with part of the primary kidney tumor. "In the traditional axial view, the tumor looked like it was arising from the kidney, but using the three views, we saw it was actually involving the adrenal gland," he said. "The multiple views increase our confidence in diagnosis as well as accuracy."

Wake Forest Baptist is one of a few centers in the country routinely viewing pediatric CT scans in all three planes. Barnes’s co-researchers are Evelyn Anthony, M.D., Michael Chen, M.D., Louise Milner, M.D., and Susan Lie-Nelson, M.D., all from Wake Forest Baptist.

Karen Richardson | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.wfubmc.edu

More articles from Health and Medicine:

nachricht Purdue cancer identity technology makes it easier to find a tumor's 'address'
16.11.2018 | Purdue University

nachricht Microgel powder fights infection and helps wounds heal
14.11.2018 | Michigan Technological University

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: UNH scientists help provide first-ever views of elusive energy explosion

Researchers at the University of New Hampshire have captured a difficult-to-view singular event involving "magnetic reconnection"--the process by which sparse particles and energy around Earth collide producing a quick but mighty explosion--in the Earth's magnetotail, the magnetic environment that trails behind the planet.

Magnetic reconnection has remained a bit of a mystery to scientists. They know it exists and have documented the effects that the energy explosions can...

Im Focus: A Chip with Blood Vessels

Biochips have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna), on which tissue can be produced and examined. This allows supplying the tissue with different substances in a very controlled way.

Cultivating human cells in the Petri dish is not a big challenge today. Producing artificial tissue, however, permeated by fine blood vessels, is a much more...

Im Focus: A Leap Into Quantum Technology

Faster and secure data communication: This is the goal of a new joint project involving physicists from the University of Würzburg. The German Federal Ministry of Education and Research funds the project with 14.8 million euro.

In our digital world data security and secure communication are becoming more and more important. Quantum communication is a promising approach to achieve...

Im Focus: Research icebreaker Polarstern begins the Antarctic season

What does it look like below the ice shelf of the calved massive iceberg A68?

On Saturday, 10 November 2018, the research icebreaker Polarstern will leave its homeport of Bremerhaven, bound for Cape Town, South Africa.

Im Focus: Penn engineers develop ultrathin, ultralight 'nanocardboard'

When choosing materials to make something, trade-offs need to be made between a host of properties, such as thickness, stiffness and weight. Depending on the application in question, finding just the right balance is the difference between success and failure

Now, a team of Penn Engineers has demonstrated a new material they call "nanocardboard," an ultrathin equivalent of corrugated paper cardboard. A square...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Optical Coherence Tomography: German-Japanese Research Alliance hosted Medical Imaging Conference

19.11.2018 | Event News

“3rd Conference on Laser Polishing – LaP 2018” Attracts International Experts and Users

09.11.2018 | Event News

On the brain’s ability to find the right direction

06.11.2018 | Event News

 
Latest News

New materials: Growing polymer pelts

19.11.2018 | Materials Sciences

Earthquake researchers finalists for supercomputing prize

19.11.2018 | Information Technology

Controlling organ growth with light

19.11.2018 | Life Sciences

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>