Forum for Science, Industry and Business

Sponsored by:     3M 
Search our Site:

 

Poorer countries, countries that spend little on health-care have worse stroke outcomes

28.10.2011
People living in poor countries or countries that spend proportionately less on health-care are about 30 per cent more likely to have a stroke, a new study shows.

They are also more likely to die from a stroke within 30 days, have a stroke at a younger age or have a hemorrhagic stroke – a more severe type caused by a burst blood vessel bleeding in or near the brain.

"The results show there is a high association between the wealth of a country, the portion of their GDP put into health-care and outcomes for stroke patients," said Dr. Gustavo Saposnik, senior author of the study and director of the Stroke Outcomes Research Unit at St. Michael's Hospital.

The correlation likely exists because these countries often don't invest enough in resources for the prevention and management of stroke risk factors, such as smoking, high blood pressure and diabetes, he said.

"If you can reduce the risk factors, you reduce the risk of stroke."

Instead of looking at data from individuals or families, Dr. Saposnik and colleagues took a unique approach from previous research and analyzed the data from regions and countries.

They linked stroke risk, 30-day death rate, hemorrhagic stroke incidence and age at disease onset to three economic indicators: GDP, money spent on health per capita and unemployment rate.

Unlike the other two indicators, unemployment rate did not affect any of the other stroke outcomes.

The results were published today in Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association.

The authors said the findings expose the potential consequences of low investment on health. "Hopefully this research will provide the necessary background to help countries make the changes in how different resources and money are allocated," Dr. Saposnik said.

About St. Michael's Hospital

St. Michael's Hospital provides compassionate care to all who enter its doors. The hospital also provides outstanding medical education to future health care professionals in more than 23 academic disciplines. Critical care and trauma, heart disease, neurosurgery, diabetes, cancer care, and care of the homeless are among the Hospital's recognized areas of expertise. Through the Keenan Research Centre and the Li Ka Shing International Healthcare Education Center, which make up the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, research and education at St. Michael's Hospital are recognized and make an impact around the world. Founded in 1892, the hospital is fully affiliated with the University of Toronto.

For more information to speak to Dr. Gustavo Saposnik, please contact:
Kate Taylor
Public Relations Specialist
St. Michael's Hospital
Phone: 416-864-6060 x. 6537 or 647-393-7527
TaylorKa@smh.ca

Kate Taylor | EurekAlert!
Further information:
http://www.smh.ca
http://www.stmichaelshospital.com

Further reports about: GDP hemorrhagic stroke risk factor stroke stroke risk unemployment rate

All articles from Health and Medicine >>>

The most recent press releases about innovation >>>

Die letzten 5 Focus-News des innovations-reports im Überblick:

Im Focus: The spin state story: Observation of the quantum spin liquid state in novel material

New insight into the spin behavior in an exotic state of matter puts us closer to next-generation spintronic devices

Aside from the deep understanding of the natural world that quantum physics theory offers, scientists worldwide are working tirelessly to bring forth a...

Im Focus: Excitation of robust materials

Kiel physics team observed extremely fast electronic changes in real time in a special material class

In physics, they are currently the subject of intensive research; in electronics, they could enable completely new functions. So-called topological materials...

Im Focus: Electrons in the fast lane

Solar cells based on perovskite compounds could soon make electricity generation from sunlight even more efficient and cheaper. The laboratory efficiency of these perovskite solar cells already exceeds that of the well-known silicon solar cells. An international team led by Stefan Weber from the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research (MPI-P) in Mainz has found microscopic structures in perovskite crystals that can guide the charge transport in the solar cell. Clever alignment of these "electron highways" could make perovskite solar cells even more powerful.

Solar cells convert sunlight into electricity. During this process, the electrons of the material inside the cell absorb the energy of the light....

Im Focus: The lightest electromagnetic shielding material in the world

Empa researchers have succeeded in applying aerogels to microelectronics: Aerogels based on cellulose nanofibers can effectively shield electromagnetic radiation over a wide frequency range – and they are unrivalled in terms of weight.

Electric motors and electronic devices generate electromagnetic fields that sometimes have to be shielded in order not to affect neighboring electronic...

Im Focus: Gentle wall contact – the right scenario for a fusion power plant

Quasi-continuous power exhaust developed as a wall-friendly method on ASDEX Upgrade

A promising operating mode for the plasma of a future power plant has been developed at the ASDEX Upgrade fusion device at Max Planck Institute for Plasma...

All Focus news of the innovation-report >>>

Anzeige

Anzeige

VideoLinks
Industry & Economy
Event News

Contact Tracing Apps against COVID-19: German National Academy Leopoldina hosts international virtual panel discussion

07.07.2020 | Event News

International conference QuApps shows status quo of quantum technology

02.07.2020 | Event News

Dresden Nexus Conference 2020: Same Time, Virtual Format, Registration Opened

19.05.2020 | Event News

 
Latest News

Road access for all would be costly, but not so much for the climate

10.07.2020 | Ecology, The Environment and Conservation

First COVID-19 Patient in Germany successfully treated with novel Diaphragm Therapy

10.07.2020 | Medical Engineering

Porous graphene ribbons doped with nitrogen for electronics and quantum computing

09.07.2020 | Physics and Astronomy

VideoLinks
Science & Research
Overview of more VideoLinks >>>